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Fort Mifflin [ on Mud Island in the Delaware River ] October 26 [ 1777 ]. Discusses plans for defence of Fort Mifflin. ALS , MS Division New York Public Library. This letter is in French. There is no addressee on the MS. In unidentified handwriting on the last page the following is written, “Col Hamilton Col John Larens.” The contents of the letter indicate that it was written to someone at...
[ September 20, 1777. On September 21, 1777, Hamilton and Laurens wrote to Sullivan : “We have just received your favour of Yesterday.” Letter not found .] Laurens, like H, was an aide-de-camp of Washington. A native of South Carolina and the son of Henry Laurens, John Laurens was H’s closest friend in Washington’s official family.
Cold in my professions, warm in ⟨my⟩ friendships, I wish, my Dear Laurens, it m⟨ight⟩ be in my power, by action rather than words, ⟨to⟩ convince you that I love you. I shall only tell you that ’till you bade us Adieu, I hardly knew the value you had taught my heart to set upon you. Indeed, my friend, it was not well done. You know the opinion I entertain of mankind, and how much it is my...
I recd yours from Lebanon and that from Point Judith. You have my warmest thanks for the great expedition of your Journey and for your exertions since your arrival at Rhode Island. I anxiously wait an account of the Admirals arrival, and of the effect which the appearance of the Fleet had. I wish you success and safety as I am My dear Sir sincerely and Affecty Yrs LS (photocopy), in Tench...
The last Post brought me your Letter of the 19 May. I must confess that I am not at all astonished at the failure of your Plans. That Spirit of Freedom which at the commencement of this contest would have gladly sacrificed every thing to the attainment of its object has long since subsided, and every selfish Passion has taken its place—it is not the public but the private Interest which...
Before this letter reaches Boston, you will, no doubt have heard of the revolt of part of the Jersey line—I did not hesitate a moment upon the report of it in determining to bring the matter to a speedy issue, by adopting the most rigorous coercion—accordingly a detachment marched from the Posts below, and on the Morning of the 27th surrounded their Quarters & brought them—without opposition...
[ Philadelphia, March 2, 1782. In July 1782, Laurens wrote to Hamilton : “I am indebted to you, my dear Hamilton, for two letters; the first from Albany, as masterly a piece of cynicism as ever was penned: the other from Philadelphia, dated the 2d March.” Letter of March 2 not found. ]
I wrote you fully by the post and have just time to tell you that I have received your letter of the 8th. & that tomorrow morning I set out with the General for Hartford to an interview with the French General and Admiral. My hopes increase, that Guichen is coming to enable us to act. For your own sake, for my sake, for the public sake, I shall pray for the success of the attempt you mention;...
I have had the pleasure to receive your favor of the 19th of Decr and also the Report of the judicious & successful Movement of General Greene, by which he compelled the Enemy to abandon their Out Posts—This brilliant Manoeuvre is another proof of the singular abilities, that officer possesses. Since my last Dispatches from So. Carolina, I have been informed, via Virginia, of the intelligence...
I had finished my letter when I received a respite of another quarter of an hour which I shall improve in writing you another ⟨let⟩ter. The Marquis thinks the Generals ⟨lett⟩er will have more weight if the Ministry ⟨see⟩ it, as it were undesignedly by you, than if you formally communicate it to them; and with a view to this he has mentioned the letter to them and advised them to ask for a...
Monroe is just setting out from Head Quarters and proposes to go in quest of adventures to the Southward. He seems to be as much of a night errant as your worship; but as he is an honest fellow, I shall be glad he may find some employment, that will enable him to get knocked in the head in an honorable way. He will relish your black scheme if any thing handsome can be done for him in that...
Morristown [ New Jersey ] April 26, 1780 . Discusses situation at Charleston. Is apprehensive of the fall of the city. Sends news of British embarkations. Regrets inability to go to the South. Df , in writing of H, George Washington Papers, Library of Congress.
Colo. Armand, who was charged with the delivery of many letters to you from the Marquis de la Fayette, imparting to his friends and the Ministry of France your mission; unfortunately arrived at Boston after you had Sailed from that place. By him, I gave you an acct of the revolt of part of the Jersey Troops—Arnolds Expedition to Virginia—Leslies arrival at Charles Town—and such other matters...
Sparks Transcripts, Harvard College Library. Although this letter is attributed to H in the Sparks Transcripts, in reality it was written by Lieutenant Colonel Tench Tilghman, H’s fellow aide. The original of the letter is in the South Carolina Historical Society. There are textual differences in the Sparks and the original, but the contents of both letters are the same. The copy in the Sparks...
Your friendly & Affectione letter of the 4th came to my hands on the 10th & would have been acknowledged yesterday by the Baron de Steuben but for some important business I was preparing for Congress. In no instance since the commencement of the War has the interposition of Providence appeared more conspicuous than in the rescue of the Post & Garrison of West point from Arnolds villainous...
LS : South Carolina Historical Society; AL (draft) and incomplete copy: Library of Congress I received your very kind Letter written at Sea off the Coast of Spain. I thank you for the friendly Hint contained in it respecting my Grandson: I see that what you propose for him might have a good Effect; but I have too much Occasion for his Assistance, and cannot spare him to make the Voyage. He...
I have received since my arrival at these Quarters, your favor of the 12th of Feby respecting the exchange of your Honble Father for Lord Cornwallis—I am sorry to inform you , that upon my arrival at Philadelphia, and for a long time after I had been there, I experienced the greatest disinclination in Congress to the exchange of Lord Cornwallis; upon any terms ; and that, it was not till after...
Colonel Laurens will be so good as to have Mrs Washington’s picture herewith given handsomely set a button for the Shirt Collar—a P the bosom—a Ring for the finger (of size of his own)—a locket for a Wa tch —or any thing else his fancy may think better. A Pair of Epaulets. A pair of Shoe & knee Buckles. Privately owned.
ALS : South Carolina Historical Society; copies (two): Library of Congress Inclos’d is a Letter I have receiv’d for you. The Seal of the Cover being imprudently plac’d over that of the Letter, and sticking to it, occasion’d it to be almost broke open.—I want to see you about a Letter I have received from New Orleans, which proposes my Paying Drafts to the Amount of 55000 Livres, whereon I...
I acknowlege but one letter from you, since you left us, of the 14th of July which just arrived in time to appease a violent conflict between my friendship and my pride. I have written you five or six letters since you left Philadelphia and I should have written you more had you made proper return. But like a jealous lover, when I thought you slighted my caresses, my affection was alarmed and...
[ Preakness, New Jersey, July 19, 1780. On July 30, 1780, Laurens wrote to Hamilton : “Your letter tho dated the 19th. did not reach me till yesterday.” Letter not found. ]
I have received your letters of the 14th of Feby and 14th of March, and am much obliged to you for the Military details they contain. I sincerely lament that your prospects are not better than they are. The impracticability of defending the bar, I fear, amounts to the loss of the town & garrison. At this distance it is difficult to judge for you, and I have the greatest confidence in General...
At the particular request of the Count De Custine I give you the trouble of the Inclosed—and am most sincerely & affectly Yrs NNC .
We ought both my Dear Laurens to beg pardon of our friendship for mutual neglect in our correspondence, though I believe you are a good deal in arrears to me, and I am sure one of my letters must have miscarried. I informed you that the application, in favour of Portail, and yourself, had been referred to a general exchange as I expected. When this general exchange will take place is...
I shall consider myself happy to see you again in that character in which you are pleased to subscribe yourself whenever the object that drew you to Carolina may cease to be a motive for your continuing there, or will permit you to rejoin your old associates here. In this let me entreat you to believe me most sincere. Some late movements of the Enemy have given rise to a variety of...
Yesterday Afternoon I recd your favr of the 4th inst. You have my warmest thanks for your indefatigable exertions to promote the intended enterprise agt the Enemy, and my sincerest wishes that you may see them crowned with the fullest success. I shall be happy if things are in a proper train at the time you mention to begin our operation. About an hour ago I recd a letter from General Maxwell,...
Your order in favor of Genl Lincoln is paid—and I shall, with great pleasure, pay the further Sum which may be due for the articles you brought from France for me, when called upon. I am sorry that the raising of the black Corps, hung in suspense when you last wrote; but hope if Your Assembly then about to sit adopted the measure, it is now in a degree of forwardness and may be useful to the...
LS : American Philosophical Society; AL (draft): Library of Congress I sent you Yesterday some Letters whi[ch] came here for you since your Departure. Mr. Necker is no longer in Place. M. Joly de Fleury succeeds him. I am again applied to for the Expences on the Alliance. Be so good as to draw an Order on me for what you think proper to pay of Gourlade and Moylands Acct. I repeat my Wishes for...
I had written the enclosed and was called off. Some ruffian hand has treated it in the manner you see. I have no time to copy it. I shall take up the story where I left it. Another reason for believing the destination is your way, is that Governor Martin and divers others refugees of Georgia South and North Carolina are said to have gone in the fleet. You will have a busy time; acquit...
I have received the Letter you did me the Honour to write me, on the 28th. of April. I most Sincerely congratulate you, on the most essential Aid you have obtained from the Court of Versailles, who upon this Occasion have done as much Honour to their own Policy, as essential Service to the United States. By a Conduct like this, which it is easy for France to hold, and which does as much...