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Documents filtered by: Recipient="Laurens, Henry"
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ALS and two copies: Massachusetts Historical Society; copy: Library of Congress I have the honour to transmit to you herewith a packet containing one hundred passports for American Vessels which I have this moment received by a Courier from England. I take this opportunity of acquainting you that a proclamation was issued out in the King’s Name on the 14th Instant, making known the cessation...
ALS : Historical Society of Pennsylvania What I am going to mention to your Excellencies will, I hope, apologize for the liberty I take of addressing myself to you. In January 79. I was appointed by the Government of Virginia to go to Europe to transact there some business of importance for the State. I was taken prisoner in coming, & did not recover my liberty ’till Novr. the same year. I...
D : Massachusetts Historical Society; copy: Public Record Office David Hartley arrived in Paris on April 24. The following day he called on the individual American peace commissioners and found them eager to arrange for the opening of British and American ports to each other’s trade and to conclude as quickly as possible a definitive treaty of peace. On April 26 he went to Versailles,...
Copies: Archives du Ministère des affaires étrangères, Library of Congress (two), National Archives (two), Massachusetts Historical Society, Charles E. Feinberg, Detroit (1957); L (draft): National Archives; LS : Philip D. Sang, River Forest, Illinois (1959), Massachusetts Historical Society You are hereby authorised and instructed to concur in behalf of these United States with his most...
ALS and five copies: Public Record Office; LS : Massachusetts Historical Society; copies: William L. Clements Library (two), Library of Congress, National Archives (two), North Carolina State Division of Archives and History; press copy of copy: Library of Congress; transcript: National Archives You may remember that from the very beginning of our Negotiation for Settling a Peace between Great...
Copies: National Archives (two), Library of Congress, Massachusetts Historical Society, Public Record Office; transcript: National Archives The proposition which has been made for an universal & unlimited reciprocity of Intercourse & Commerce, between Great-Britain and the American United-States, requires a very serious Consideration on the part of Great-Britain, for the reasons already stated...
I have the honor to transmit to your care an Open Letter for Brigadr General Scott, by which you will perceive that I have directed the Levies in Virginia to be formed into three Batallions and to be officered & marched under his command, to reinforce the Southern Army, as soon as circumstances will possibly permit. I give you this trouble, lest these directions should interfere with any...
I am honored with your letter of the 15th with its inclosures—and shall with pleasure give you my opinion on the points which you have been pleased to suggest. With respect to the negotiation on the subject of an Exchange of Prisoners—I think the propositions held out on our part are substantially right, and, on general principles of justice and policy ought to be adhered to—How far the...
Middlebrook [ New Jersey ] March 18, 1779 . Discusses exchange of prisoners. Believes that civilian prisoners should not be exchanged at this time. Raises question as to mode of delivery of prisoners. Df , in writing of H, George Washington Papers, Library of Congress. Laurens was a member of Congress from South Carolina; Burke was a member of the same body from North Carolina.
Since I had the honor of addressing you upon the 29th ulto I have not been able to learn, with any precision, whether the transports that arrived brought any considerable number of Troops. A Hessian Deserter says there were only a few German convalescents on board. If so, the Fleet, with 2500 mentioned in my last, is not arrived; supposing they were bound to Philada. General Sinclair arrived...