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Documents filtered by: Recipient="La Luzerne, Anne-César, chevalier de" AND Period="Confederation Period"
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I have been honored with your Excellys favor of the 18th from Annapolis covering a letter from the Marqs de la Fayette, for the trouble of doing which be pleased to accept my thanks. I regret exceedingly that the weather and roads shou’d have deprived me of the honor of seeing you at my retreat—I shall look however, with pleasure for your return to Annapolis, when I shall expect the fulfilment...
The Letter addressed by your Excellency to the President of the Society of the Cincinnati, and the Memorials referred to that Body, have been laid before the General Meeting. The Institution, as it is amended, admits into this Society “the late & present Ministers of his Most Xian Majesty to the United States; all the Generals & Colonels of Regiments and Legions of the Land Forces; all the...
It was not until Capt: Hardwine deliver’d the Claret your Excellency was so obliging as to spare me, that I had the least knowledge of its being sent. In consequence of your kind offer to furnish me with three hogsheads, I wrote to Colo. Tilghman (at Baltimore) requesting him to receive & forward it to me; & obtained for answer, that before Your Excellys order had reached your Agent at that...
The letter your Excellency did me the honor to write in the moment of your departure from this Country, conferred the highest honor upon me, & is not more flattering to my vanity, than it is productive of my gratitude. I shall ever reflect with pleasure Sir, on the readiness with which your communications to me have been made; & the dispatch & ability with which you have conducted business in...
Your early attention to me after your arrival at the Court of Versailles, amidst scenes of gaiety & the gratulations of friends, does me great honor & excites my warmest acknowledgments. That your august Sovereign, his amiable consort, & the Princes his brothers, should deign to interest themselves in, & wish to be acquainted with the circumstances of my life, is one of the most flattering...
I am indebted to you for your several favors of the 20th of Decr introductory of Mr de Chateaufort—of the 15th of Feby & 25th of March, which I should not have suffered to have remained so long unacknowledged, if anything had occurred, the relation of which could have compensated for the trouble of reading my letter. Long as I have waited for such an event, nothing has yet happen’d of much...
The letter you did me the honor to write to me on the 3d of Feby, has come safely to hand. Nothing could be more satisfactory to me than the friendly sentiments contained in it, & the generous manner in which you always interest yourself in the happiness & dignity of the United States. I wish I had it in my power to inform you, that the several States had fully complied with all the wise...
The Compte de Moustier your successor in office hath forwarded from New York, the letter in which you did me the honour to bring me acquainted with the merits of that Nobleman. Since it is the misfortune of America not to be favored any longer with your residence, it was necessary, to diminish our regrets, that so worthy and respectable a character should be appointed your successor. I shall...
As not any thing which is interesting to your happiness and glory can be indifferent to me, I have a sincere pleasure in congratulating you on your appointment as Ambassador from the most Christien King to the Court of London. Altho your Excellency may possibly have had some knowledge of Mr Barlow (the gentleman who will put this letter into your hands and of whom it is recommendatory) during...
At the sametime that I again thank your Excellency for offering me part of the Claret which you have at Baltimore, let me once more pray that my acceptance of it may put you to no inconvenience. I should be unhappy if I thought this would be the case. If, on the other hand, you can conveniently spare it, and Colo. Tilghman should be in Baltimore, I could wish to have it put into his care; as...