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Mr. Frazer is appointed first Leiutenant instead of Mr. Mossom. The other Appointments of your County remain unaltered. The inclosed Resolution respecting the prisoners will explain the Ideas of the Council Board on that Subject. Thirty pounds cash accompany this. Such of the prisoners as you may judge most in want of Clothes, will be furnished in such manner as you think best. If absolute...
By the Bearer Lieut. Jas. Meriwether I send two hundred and thirty six pounds 16/. for the recruiting Soldiers in your County and the adjacent ones, to serve in the Battalions of this Commonwealth. You are to be assisted by Your Field officers in chusing 1 Captain 2 Lieutenants and one Ensign of the most proper persons who have the best chance to raise these Men quickly and deliver them the...
Mr. Strother Jones proposes setting out in a few days for the Continental Army, where he wishes to Contin[ue] if he can Obtain an Appointment near the person of either of the Generals. Gentel and Agreable, he is favour’d with several Letters to Gentlemen of Rank in the Army Yet thinks an Introduction from you to General Washington or to any other General to whom you think proper will have...
If I were to consider punctilio more than the suggestions of friendship, I should expect an answer to some of the letters I have written you, before I dispatched another. But I ever hated ceremonies, and shall not commence ceremony with you. I wish it were in my power to give you any very interesting news, but alas, the slow assembling of an Army prevents any attempt from us upon the enemy,...
We are this moment informed here, that some evil disposed people (no doubt hired for the purpose) have industriously propagated among the N. Carolina Troops, and among the recruits of Virginia in the upper parts, that the plague rages in our Army . In consequence of which, it is said, the recruiting business stops, and desertions are frequent. There never was a more infamous and groundless...
I had this Morning, the Pleasure of your Favour of the Sixteenth instant, by the Post; and rejoice to learn that your Battal­ lions, were So far fill’d, as to render a Draught from the Militia, unnecessary. It is a dangerous Measure, and only to be adopted in great Extremities, even by popular Governments. Perhaps, in Such Governments Draughts will never be made, but in Cases, when the People...
I had this Morning, the Pleasure of your Favour of the Sixteenth inst, by the Post; and rejoice to learn that your Battallions, were so far fill’d, as to render a Draught from the Militia, unnecessary. It is a dangerous Measure, and only to be adopted in great extremities, even by popular Governments. Perhaps, in Such Governments Draughts will never be made, but in Cases, when the People...
It will not perhaps be disagreeable to you in your retirement, sometimes to hear the events of war, and how in other respects we proceed in the arduous business we are engaged in. Since the loss of Ticonderoga (into the cause of which, and the conduct of the commanding Officers, Congress have ordered inquiry to be made) and Gen. Burgoynes speedy march to Fort Edward, our affairs in that...
I take the liberty of troubling you upon a Subject of very great consequence to myself, and which I have very much at heart. Mr. Nelson very early shewed his inclination to defend his Country by entring into the service in the 7th. Regiment as a Major, in which capacity he acquitted himself to the satisfaction of every body. He is since advanced to be Lt. Colonel in that regiment, where he...
This Morning the Inclosed Interesting Intelligence was received by Congress from General Gates. As I am sure you will receive pleasure in reviewing even the Minutia of this great and Glorious Victory I shall make no Apology for sending you a Copy of the several Letters in the Rough dress you see them haveing made it off in a Hurry at the Clerks Table. Gates’s Rapid Successes to the Northward...
I Had the honour to Receive your obliging favor by Mr. Harvey, with Forty seven Dollars, being an additional Donation of the County of Albemarle for relieving the poor of Boston which shall be faithfully applied to their Benefit. My constant application to Publick Business both in and out of Congress, has so impair’d my Health, that some Relaxation has become absolutely necessary, and to...
I wrote you about ten days ago that General Gates had obtain’d a Signal Victory over General Burgoyne on the 7th. Inst. and now have the pleasure of informing you that a few days after this defeat Burgoyne with his whole Army Surrend’d themselves prisoners of War to the American General. It is said the prisoners Stores &c. taken are as followeth Viz 1 Lt. General, 2 Major Generals, 7 Brigadier...
Your Letter of November the 26th. was handed to me by the post before the last. The great Objects of the Assemblys Deliberations are of the most Interesting Nature and I have no Doubt they will bring them to Maturity with their Usual Wisdom. If the late Generous Spirit of Virginia in their Act for Cloathing and Measures for preventing of Forestalling does not Inspire the other States with a...
You are desired to receive into your Custody John Goodrich the Elder, who is ordered to be removed from Bedford County, the place of his present Confinement; and will be delivered by the order of the County Lieut: of Bedford. He is to be Safely kept and prosecuted agreeable to directions of Assembly by the Attorney General . I am Sir, Yr. hble Servt., RC ( DLC ); in an unidentified hand and...
The council board has been so much crouded with business of late, that I could not procure an order for the removal of Goodrich to Albemarle, ‘till this morning. I should not have delayed to comply with the resolution of Assembly so long, had it not been necessary to examine him in the county, in which it is supposed he committed the crime. The order for his removal went by express to day to...
We are this moment made acquainted by the War Office that an Express was immediately to depart for Virginia, and I take the opportunity of enclosing by him the last papers, which contain all our news, except it be a report that seems not illy founded, that Genl. Amhers[t] and Adml. Keppel are arrived at Philadelphia as commissioners from the King and Parliament of G. B. to carry into execution...
Having detained the Express that he might carry you the news that we heard was on its way from France, I am furnished with an opportunity of congratulating you on the important event of a Treaty of Commerce, and one of Alliance and Amity, having been signed at Paris on the 6th of February last, between France and these United States. Having been as particular as we could on this subject in the...
We have once more ventured into the field of composition as the inclosed Address will shew you. And I have the pleasure to acquaint you that Congress have unanimously ratified the Treaties with France, and directed the ratifications to be presented for exchange in due season. The inclosed pamphlet I t[ake to] be a production of Dr. Franklin. It is well written, and was published first in...
I thank you for your favor of the 5th which I received yesterday. It is the only satisfactory account I have received of the proceedings of our Assembly. The enemy have made many insidious attempts upon us lately, not in the military way, they seem tired of that, but in the way of negotiation. Their first, was by industriously circulating the bills of pacification as they call them, before...
The inclosed Gazette will shew you the progress, and perhaps the end for some time, of our negotiation with the British Commissioners. They, with their whole Army have abandoned Philadelphia, and our Troops are in possession of that City. The enemy are pushing thro Jersey for South Amboy, and in their front is Gen. Maxwell with a brigade of Continentals and the Jersey Militia. They have...
The condition of our affairs is much changed since last I had the pleasure of writing to you, as by the favor of his Most Christian Majesty we now are become Masters of the Sea, on our own Coast at least. Ten days ago arrived in the Delaware a french Squadron commanded by Count D’Esteing consisting of 12 sail of the Line and 4 frigates, having of Seamen and land Troops 11,000 Men on board....
I was very glad to see your Observations , tho they differ considerably from those we made here. The same Misfortune of a cloudy Morning prevented us from seeing the Beginning, but we had a very good View of the End which Mr. Page made at 11h 3′ 25″ and myself at 11h 3′ 27″ tho’ I think the Altitude of the Sun was such as must render the Observations uncertain to a few Seconds. The End of...
Your favor inclosing £36 11 0 is now before me, which Sum I consider as a full discharge of your Bond payable to me, conditioned to pay £27 10 0 which Bond is herein inclosed, striped of its Seal &c. You are pleased to Say that the practical part of musick afforded you much Entertainment and that you wanted an Organ. I have two daughters, who practice upon keyed Instruments; their music Master...
I got your Favour about 3 o’Clock yesterday Afternoon by your Servant. I have not above Half a Dozen Papers left, therefore it is out of my Power to furnish the Subscribers with last Week’s Gazette. Indeed there was no News of any Consequence in it. I have sent one for you, and another for Dr. Gilmer. Since our last, we have a Confirmation of Capt. Jones’s taking the Drake 20 Gun ship and...
I agree entirely with you concerning the importance of the confederation, and have never failed to press it. Ten States have ratified—Jersey, Delaware, and Maryland have not, and one of them, Maryland, has adjourned until November, so that the new Congress under the Confederation cannot meet this year at the time proposed by the Confederacy. The inclosed paper contains all the news we have,...
Williamsburgh, 19 Aug. 1778 . Critical discussion of TJ’s “Observations on the late Eclipse” as sent to Rev. James Madison (see Madison to TJ, 26 July 1778 ). “I have annexed the Method used by the famous Short for finding the Effect of Parallax in a Transit of Venus, only applying it here to the Moon.” RC ( DLC ); 5 p. containing 4 rough astronomical diagrams. Text faded beyond legibility at...
I should have done myself the pleasure of Answering your letter of July the 19th. several weeks ago, if I had not wished to have made a through enquiry after the workmen you want to Employ previous to my writeing to you on that Subject. Ben Randolph professes an Inclination to Accomodate you with an House joiner and tells me that he has been Constant in his researches after one since I...
A few days past, since the last post left us, Mr. Harvey presented me your favor of August the 30th, to which this is an answer; and which I shall direct to Williamsburg upon a supposition that the Assembly has called you there by the time the letter can reach that place. The hand bill you have seen was certainly written by Mauduit, and circulated under the auspices of administration. It was...
You will be good enough, my dear Sir, to excuse this Letter. There are but few Men indeed with whom I could wish to be thus candid. It appears to me that Congress will shortly be dissolved. If the large Emissions of Money, and visionary Expeditions do not bring forth our destruction, I greatly fear that Party will complete the matter. Congress exhibit not more than two or three Members...
Mr. Carrington, who is a defendant in the suit, brought by your Relation Jefferson vs. Reade’s administrators , obtained an order at the last court, that he, as being nonresident, should give security for costs at the next Term. Will you be so good, as to inform him of this, if he is within the circle of your correspondence? Be pleased to add, that dismission is the penalty on non compliance...
I am sorrey to be under the Needcessity of troubleing you with a Matter that is of little consequence to you or any one at Present but my self, but as I have been imposed on and have no Prospect of redress but from you I hope you will consider my circumstance as a sufficient appoligy. In October last your overseear Zach Morris was offering for sale three Hhds of Your Tobo on James River at the...
As there is a probability that the Gentlemen who bear this letter will arrive in Virginia when you have condescended to come down from above and interest yourselves in Human Affairs; I could not but take the Liberty of introducing them and the Business with which they are commissioned to your Attention. They go to represent to your Commonwealth, the Situation of this State and of Georgia,...
I have had a transient view of a general scheme of education for this state, which I am informed was so far approved by the last Assembly as to be submitted to the consideration of the people and referred to a future session. The nature of the design must recommend it to every lover of learning and of his country; the idea was greatly imagined; and the whole plan bears an impression of the...
I have not been unmindful of the small commission you gave me to procure the song and receipt for you. I once had these, but they are mislaid so that I could not find them when I returned home, from Williamsburg, or they should have been sent from thence. I have here applied to Mr. Peters for the one, and to Mrs. Shippen for the other and I have hopes of getting them both. I send you herewith...
The Indiana Company, I hear, are preparing to defend their Claim, under the Indian Purchase; which is to come before the Assembly, on the third Monday in May next; and will of Course, I suppose, desire to be heard at the Bar of the House: if it will be agreeable to You to answer the Arguments of their Counsel, I will undertake to open the Matter, on Behalf of the Commonwealth. The Treaty with...
Major General Phillips sends his Compliments to Mr. and Mrs. Jefferson, requests the favour of their company at dinner on Thursday next at Two o’clock to meet General and Madame de Reidesel . Major General Phillips hopes Miss Jefferson will be permitted to be of the party to meet the young Ladies from Collè . RC ( DLC ). Maj. Gen. William Phillips was the ranking officer of the Convention...
Majr. Genl. Phillips sends his compliments to Mr. Jefferson. He would with much pleasure wait on Mr. Jefferson next Wednesday, but is engaged for that day at dinner with his family at General Reidesel’s. RC ( DLC ).
I beg your pardon for having writen to you prematurely. I confess I had never seen the printed bill, and having waited for it a long time, I began to be afraid that negligent printer would not publish it before the next session of Assembly. I am much indebted to you for the obliging pains you have taken to inform me of its nature and design. I was mistaken with regard to the appointment of...
Always attentive to your commands, I have obtained here, and now inclose you the song and the receipt you desired. I once had both of them at home, but they are mislaid among a mass of papers, so that I could find neither previous to my leaving Chantilly, or your request would then have been complied with. I hope you have received the pamphlet I sent you some weeks ago entitled “Observations...
I wish it were in my power to write you satisfactorily on the state of our public affairs. My residence here is of too short a date to enable to form a proper judgment of them. There are matters of great concern now before congress, of which I am not at liberty to speak freely, tho’ I am of opinion we may have peace on honorable and advantageous terms, in the course of the ensuing winter. We...
The difficulty of conveying letters across the Countrey and some hopes of seing you in the City the first of April, are but poor, and yet they are the only Palliatives I can offer, for having so long delayed Acknowledging the receipt of your favor of Decemr. 18th. I immediately wrote to our friend W. to be informed if any thing had happen’d, or passed between you and him, which made it...
I promised myself the satisfaction of receiving letters from some of my friends by the express who brought the distressing account of the enemy’s success at Portsmouth, but I have not received a letter from Virginia since my arrival here, except from Mrs. Fleming. I am apprehensive the enemy will commit great ravages before an effectual check can be given to their progress, as the dispersed...
I have paid due attention to your favor of April the 21st., and I believe there would have been no difficulty in obtaining what is desired for Baron de Geismar had not the enemy created the difficulties that do exist. They absolutely refuse to admit partial exchanges, and they have lately proposed such unfair terms for general exchange that nothing can be done in either of these ways. They...
I would have waited on you to congratulate you on your Appointment yesterday had I not been under an Engagement to return Home with Mazzei. I attended at your Lodgings today as soon as our Board adjourned, but you were not at Home. I am unhappily obliged to be at Gloster Court tomorrow, and therefore think it proper, notwithstanding our Intimacy and Friendship, to inform you of this; lest till...
Having been inform’d that since your Excellencys Appointment to the Government of this Commonwealth your residence will be chiefly, if not entirely at the seat of Government, You will pardon me if (tempted by the perpetual view of your delightfull Seat from my lowly and I may say Dirty Cottage) I should venture to ask a preference should you be disposed to permit any other than your own family...
Copies of two Acts of Congress of the 14th Inst. are herewith enclosed. One recommending to the States to exempt Drivers of Waggons from Militia duties while in Service. The other for ascertaining their wages. I have the honor to be with great Respect Your Excellency’s Most obedt. Servant. FC ( DLC : PCC , No. 14) of a circular to several governors from the President of Congress. A copy,...
I must lament the having lost, by your Succeeding Mr: Henry in the Government of Virginia, a very agreeable neighbour of whose Society I had promised myself a great share, and proposed with my friend Reidesel to have profited of your and Mrs: Jefferson’s acquaintance during our residence in this Country. As it is I do assure you I wish you personally every possible good. I request to put the...
The happiness I have had in becoming acquainted with you, and the many kindnesses I received of you during your short residence at Montichelli, induces me to present you these lines, and my most perfect congratulations on your new Charge as Governor of Virginia, as much Pleasure as it is possible for this event to give you. Such on your account I feel on the occasion, having only to struggle...
Your obliging letter, without a signature, came safe to hand. As letters frequently miscarry between this and Virginia it was a good caution, which I shall take the liberty to follow. That peace and the independance of the thirteen states are within our power is a point not well established; but thus much I think myself at liberty to say, that Congress, long before my arrival here, were called...
J’ai reçu la lettre dont V. E. m’a honoré au nom de l’assemblée generale de Virginie ainsi que l’expedition autentique de l’acte que cette assemblée a passé pour ratifier les traités conclus entre le Roi mon maitre et les 13. Etats unis de l’Amerique Septentrionale. Je M’estime heureux d’avoir à transmettre à S. Mté. un temoignage aussi autentique de la facon de penser et des procedés d’un...