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    • Short, William
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    • Jefferson, Thomas
    • Jefferson, Thomas
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    • post-Madison Presidency

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Documents filtered by: Author="Short, William" AND Recipient="Jefferson, Thomas" AND Recipient="Jefferson, Thomas" AND Period="post-Madison Presidency"
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Your kind, friendly & most instructive favor of Oct: 31. has been constantly under my eyes, & often read over, although I have until now postponed acknowleging & thanking you for it. I cannot tell you how much you have delighted me by making me so much better acquainted than I was, with the great & virtuous Philosopher of whom I have long considered myself, though unworthy, a disciple. Like...
I have not hastened to reply to your letter of June 19. because I saw that your departure for Bedford would prevent your recieving it until your return; & the present will reach Monticello at your debotter . I am sorry that M r H. should think any thing further, to be necessary for his safety; not, assuredly, that I am not willing to give him every satisfaction his caution can devise, but...
I return you a thousand thanks for your kind & friendly letter of the 24 th ult o . The details as to the state, of your health, I had been long wishing for—They are now doubly gratifying to me, as they inform me that you have so perfectly recovered from the only inroad I had ever known on your constitution. And this attack I percieve was brought on by an inattention to the second maxim— il...
I cannot too much thank you for your kind letter of the 14 th It gave me great relief from the anxiety I was under on account of reports as to your health & the affairs of the University—To the last, as mere reports, I should have paid no attention, after those which prevailed on the same subject, & without even the shadow of a foundation, some time ago. But the Richmond Enquirer which I see...
I had the pleasure of thanking you in part in my letter of May 2. for your most invaluable favor contained in yours of April. I say in part; for it would take more than one letter to contain the whole of my gratitude for this most acceptable mark of your friendship. I have read it over & over again; always with delight & instruction, & a renewed sense of my obligation to your amiable...
The last letter which I have had the pleasure of writing to you, was of the date of Octob: 9. in acknowlegement of your kind favor of the 8 th of Sept r . You are well assured that my long silence has not proceeded from indifference to the gratification of hearing from you, but from an unwillingness to add to your burthen, already too great, of correspondence with your friends. In the mean...
I had this pleasure on the 2 d ul to & trust that letter got safe to hand. I inclosed in it a song composed & sung at a public dinner by a man of your own age, & who to me has always professed the longest & most invariable friendship for you. I sent at the same time the discourse of a Russian on public education. I thought it might perchance amuse you to see the ideas in those climates on this...
It is always a great gratification to me to recieve one of your letters. That of Aug: 9. I found here on my return from my summer’s excursion—It gratified me first by informing me that your long confinement had not affected your general health, of which I was very apprehensive, & secondly by the account you give me of the state of the University—That account came here most opportunely—for a...
Knowing your present aversion to writing, & knowing also how much you are accablé by inevitable correspondence, I have abstained for some time from adding to this load. If I break in upon you at this moment it is because I am in search of information that I know not where to look for otherwise, & indeed which I can have no certainty of finding from you—If you recollect, among the articles...
I had last the pleasure of writing to you on the 14 th of August, from Ballston Spa, my usual summer residence. The cause of my troubling you at present, you will find inclosed—a letter from our old & worthy friend de la Motte, which he sent to me with a request that I would forward it to you. I had remained several years without hearing from him; & I learn now with real pain, that the cause...