You
have
selected

  • Author

    • Short, William
  • Recipient

    • Jefferson, Thomas
    • Jefferson, Thomas
  • Period

    • Confederation Period

Dates From

Dates To

Search help
Documents filtered by: Author="Short, William" AND Recipient="Jefferson, Thomas" AND Recipient="Jefferson, Thomas" AND Period="Confederation Period"
Results 1-10 of 56 sorted by recipient
  • |<
  • <<
  • <
  • Page 1
  • >
  • >>
  • >|
A letter I recieved yesterday from Mr. Limosin shews that your letter would have been much too late for the packet had it been forwarded on immediately on its arrival. The Packet sailed from the road of Havre at 5. o’clock in the morning of the 10th. Your letter arrived at Paris the evening of the same day.—Mr. Limosin tells me there is only an English ship at Havre, to sail soon for...
I wrote you last from the Hague. Since that I have passed through Leyden and Haarlem on my Way to this Place which I find as busy and commercial as I think it can be. And yet I am told it has declined and is declining. This gives me Concern because I find several attributing it to an Intercourse with America and to the Independence of the latter. How true this may be in Fact I cannot say, yet...
I am now in daily expectation of the pleasure of receiving a letter from you and hope it will bring us an account of your safe arrival at the Hague and of your having found there Mr. Adams.—You recollect without doubt the extract in the Mercure , from Mazzei’s book, where it was said, ‘ qu’ il y a vingt dieux, ou qu’il n’y en a qu’un &c. ’ In consequence of it Pankcoucke is decreté...
You will be surprized by my Letter written on Friday Evening which mentioned that yours had not arrived. I waited until as late in the Evening as I could on Account of the Departure of the Post before I wrote. Some Time after that Mr. Dumas called to let me know he had just received the Letter which he presented me. I was exceedingly happy to find that it allowed us to pursue the Measures...
I have been so much occupied for some Time in getting ready for the Voyage that I have only Time to inclose you a Letter f[rom] Mr. Madison which will give you all the important Information of this Place. No Mail arrived here from the Northward last Thursday—So that I am still undetermined whether you will sail on the 25th. as at first supposed. I have seen from the Beginning it would be...
[ Richmond, 23 Apr. 1784. Noted in SJL as received 30 Apr. 1784. Letter not found, but its subject was no doubt the possibility that TJ would be appointed as minister. TJ was troubled to learn that that possibility was being rumored in Virginia, and, on the same day that he received Short’s letter, he replied expressing his embarrassment; TJ to Short, 30 Apr. 1784 . Short explained that a...
I wrote you in a hurry from Geneva because I was forced to leave that place at a very short warning occasioned 1. by having been tricked by one voiturier and 2. by the necessity of taking another which then presented himself on the condition of my setting off in company with a carriage then getting ready. Both of these carriages were of two wheels each and two places. I was obliged to take one...
This letter with the others inclosed would have been sent two days sooner but for a mistake in the post-days of Aix. I waited until saturday without writing because I wished to be able to give you some information of your map; and from saturday until to-morrow the post does not set out for Aix.—The engraver kept his word and went through all your corrections in the course of the last week....
In my letter the day before yesterday I mentioned to you the progress I had made with the engraver. Yesterday his part of the work was entirely completed. I have employed him to have 250 copies taken for you, not knowing any better mode of having it done as you left no directions with me respecting it. He enquired of me yesterday if I was charged with the payment of these matters &c. I have...
Colo. Humphries has informed me that a French Gentleman who sets out for London to-day presents a favorable Opportunity of conveying your Letters to you. The Marquis de la Fayette informed him of this Circumstance and desired that the Letters should be sent to him this Morning, to be by him committed to the Care of this Gentleman. You will therefore Sir recieve under the Cover of Colo....