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Documents filtered by: Recipient="Jefferson, Thomas" AND Period="post-Madison Presidency"
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W m Harris Jones presents his most respectful Compliments to M r Jefferson, & begs the favour, (if Mr J’s health will permit), of his viewing the fine paintings by Van Derlyn, which W. H. J. has brought up to Charlottesville As they have stood the test of criticism in Paris—as well as in most parts of the Union W. H. J. is sure M r J would be much gratified by the inspection—M r Van Derlyn...
When I requested the catalogues from you, I was not the least aware, that the Boxes, in the University, could be considered the property of M r Hilliard, but such being the case it would, of course, be the height of imprudence to meddle with them. I regret this the more inasmuch as those who attended my lectures last year will find that we possess no additional advantages this—& the two first...
In consequence of the drouth our well have most all given out and our pipes are so much decayed that we can’t get a supply from the Mountain without going to a considerable expence in renewing them and consequently we are put to considerable inconveniance for the want of a sufficiency of water—The well have also declined in Charlottesville——The people of Charlottesville have proposed that we...
As the poet says, “there are strings in the human heart, which once touched will some times utter dreadful discord.” Per the public vehicles of information the expresident has perceived the very illiberal manner in which my character & feelings have been treated; and that of those of his honor have been unintentionably wounded, mine have b een publickly assaulted, & lacerated?—why?—Because...
When I had the pleasure of seeing you yesterday, it escaped my memory to beg of you an inspection of the Bill of Parcels of the unopened Boxes of Books now in the University. I will therefore feel obliged by your sending them to me by the Bearer to the end that I may take out some works essentially necessary for me in the present department of my course—leaving the remainder in their places so...
Yours of the 17th: is now before me. Your Tobacco from Bedford I have never yet heard from; I have rec d from Albemarle, since last fall, 430 Blls Flour on your a/c, and finding no prospect whatever of selling it here, to advantage, ship d it long since to the Eastward, where I hope it will yield you a better return than could possibly be anticipated here, if indeed a sale of it could have...
I congratulate you, on the proper feeling for your long life of meritorious service that seems to pervade every part of our country, and I anticipate from it, in every way, a result such as your friends would wish, and ought to expect. May the attachment of your fellow citizens render the close of your useful life, equally comfortable and honourable. I should not trouble you now with a letter,...
I received a letter some time past from M r Madison advising me of the arrival of a box of seeds, sent from France, addressed to him as President of the A. A. Society; and which he turned over to me—I immediately wrote to the French Consul of France requesting him to consign it to M r Allen of Fredericksburg or Moncure Robinson & Pleasants of Richmond—since which I have heard nothing of it—I...
Your favor of the 5 th inst t has again highly obliged me by the kind interest you always take in what concerns me and Your subscription to my trigonometry if I can bring it to light in which the book sellers here are not very liberal in lending a hand, so that perhaps I may have to send it to a friend in London for publication. Upon Your account of the Professors of Virginia University and...
M r Madison has transmitted to me the enclosed letters respecting a box of seeds sent from the Museum at Paris—Altho’ I do not think that I have any thing to do with it. I have nevertheless complied with his suggestions in requesting Mess rs Mackay and Campbell to forward it for the use of the University of Virginia, to which I understand is attached a Botanical Garden: and I have taken the...
I have just received your letter of yesterday. I need not assure you that it will give me very great pleasure to promote your wishes. Immediately after we visited the ground I wrote a note to the Proctor requesting Laborers and carts. I have not yet, even received an answer from him, which is much to be regretted as the season is far advanced & there will be necessity to change the surface of...
I have now the satisfaction to inform you that the Bill, for remitting the duties demanded of the university, has passed the Senate, & has probably, by this time, received it’s consummation as a law by the signature of the President. The committee of the Senate, to which the Bill was referred, reported it with an amendment, the object of which was to provide for another case supposed by the...
Your kind favor of 8 th ult o reached me in Raleigh, and I write to thank you for the willingness you express to promote my project of a history of the Revolution. As my tour has already been much longer in duration than I expected, and as pressing duties at home demand my speedy return, I am compelled for the present to deny myself the pleasure of the visit to Monticello, which I...
It was with great pleasure that I rec d your favor of the 6 th inst. because it furnished evidence of your health—for my prayer is joined to that of grateful millions that you may live long & happily. But I will not trouble you with the reading of a long letter, however much I am disposed to write one. I thank you for your kind recollection of me & the little matter that was between us, the...
An accident prevented the receipt of your letter of the 25 th of November last, for so long a period after its date, that I then thought it better to postpone writing to you in reply, until I could communicate some intelligence in relation to the subject to which it refer’d—The delay of the House of Representatives to pass the bill which M r Rives had introduced into that body, until a few...
I have observed a Lottery advertised to be Drawn sometime hence from a Train of Ill Luck or something Else—I am Reduced to Straitend Circumstances perhaps I might have some good fortune after a Long train of Bad—will you be pleased to send as a present 2 or 3 tickets as an old friend and acquaintance which will be Esteemed a particular favour Indeed and more Ensured from my Heart if you comply...
Since my last letter it has occurred to me that it should have contained an idea which I did not express. It is this—that under the circumstances in which the Governours of States, and the Continental Officers were placed, it is reasonable to suppose that however correct the conduct of the former may have been, the opinions of the latter would be unfavourable to them. Indeed, the more...
on the inst. we shipped to the care of Col. Peyton 3 cases Books from England, 1 from France, & 2 from Germany; & yesterday one other case from Germany. These, with what are now on their way from Europe, and the addition of some American works, which have not, as yet been found, will make about the full amount of our commission. We have received by the last arrivals advice of such works as...
I return the correspondence inclosed in yours of the 3d. inst. The reluctance of Mr. Emmett, & probably of his colleagues, to the enlargement of their duties, is neither to be wondered at, nor yielded to. You have put the matter on a ground to which I can suggest no improvement. It may be well perhaps that what has passed, should not be generally known. With some it might produce reflections...
I return the correspondence enclosed in yours of the 3 d inst. The reluctance of M r Emmett, & probably of his colleagues, to the enlargement of their duties, is neither to be wondered at nor yielded to. You have put the matter on a ground to which I can suggest no improvement. It may be well perhaps that what has passed should not be generally known. With some it might produce reflections on...
It has given me infinite pleasure to hear from you by the letter which you were so good as to send by M r Randolph, dated March 24. He gave it to me a few days ago only, on his return from Boston; having passed through this City without stopping on his way thither. I was indeed very anxious to hear of you & of your health, though unwilling to trouble you with a letter & impose on you the tax...
I had the pleasure of recieving your letter of 22 nd ult. some days ago; but unwilling to vex & tire you with the repetition of unsatisfactory communications, I have forborne to reply to it, until I could communicate something decisive upon the subject of the duties. I have now the satisfaction to inform you that the Bill, for remitting them, has this day passed the House of Representatives, &...
I write to you by a special influence while standing at my Desk, I was looking around the world to see if I could find one man, who had arrived, to a state of compleat happiness, eather in the abundance of riches or honour, in those two pursuits most of men, are engaged. while looking for the man of honour, I could think of no man who had arrived to so complete a state, as your self—this leads...
At the request of some military friends, and in compliance with a desire which I have for several years entertained, I am preparing a second edition of my fathers memoirs of the Southern war—with his own M.S. corrections, with the advantage of various suggestions from Col. Howard & with such additions and explanations as my own acquaintance with the subject will enable me to furnish. In this...
Very soon after the death of my friend, the late M r Gilmer, M r Davis made known to me your wish that I should fill the vacancy thereby occasioned in the law department of the University of Virginia; and four days ago a letter from him informed me of the choice made by the Visitors at their late meeting. I hasten to avail myself of the first interval of ease which an acute, tho’ I hope...
Circumstances induce me to attempt the publication of the courses of analytical trigonometry which I had planed in 1806 and used at the Military Academy of West point, and adapted peculiarly to the habitual mode and order of studying elementary mathematics in this country. Supposing the Knowledge of the most elementary Books of Euclid, and the simplest Algebra, till quadratic equations...
I arrived here this morning from New York. Every thing is now ready to commence the sale of the tickets. But a movement has taken place in New-York promising some thing more in its effects than any thing of the kind heretofore. a meeting has been called (in pursuance of the request of individuals) by the mayor to be held to morrow to take the subject in to consideration. I had an interview...
I have employed V. W Southall Esqr as counsel for the University and now send you his opinion on the several subjected submitted to him, for your perusal, after which be pleased to return it that I may lay it before the Faculty at their meeting on monday evening—With respect to Mosby & Droffin, on monday next is the day for renewing their licenses, the court will no doubt refuse them ordinary...
I have just received your letter in relation to the Botanic garden, accompanied by suggestion, as to its economy, from the late Abbé Correa. I need not say how much I approve of those Suggestions, as they obviously comprehend the most philosophical rules for making Botany as useful, & therefore important, study, and for freeing it from its present immense and cumbersome dress of...
The Corporation of the City of New York have caused Medals to be struck, to commemorate the completion of the Erie Canal which unites the great Western Lakes with the Atlantic Ocean. The Corporation, influenced by a deep and profound respect for those memorable and patriotic Citizens, who affixed their names to the Declaration of Independence, and pledged in its support “their lives, their...