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[ Philadelphia, 29 May 1781 . In Col. William Fleming’s letter to TJ of 14 June 1781 , q.v., he enclosed a “paper” which “came under cover from Our members in Congress of the 29th of May,” in which letter “mention is made of a letter from the King of France of a late date to Congress the contents of which will be sent to the respective legislatures, without hinting the purport.” The letter...
[…] [ap]plication […], […] with no Difficulty in arbitrating [the?] dispute, as he admitted the Facts stated [as?] agreed between you; and acquiesced in the Gentleman proposed; but contrary to our Expectation we received a Letter from him a Copy of which is inclosed and also our Answer to it. You [will] see by these Letters the Turn this affair has taken; and we must wait your further...
The complexion of the intelligence received of late from Spain, with the manner of thinking which begins to prevail in Congress with regard to the claims to the navigation of the Mississippi , makes it our duty to apply to our constituents for their precise full and ultimate sense on this point. If Spain should make a relinquishment of the navigation of that river on the part of the United...
Since our last in which we informd Your Excellency of the Arrival of Col: Harrison in this City, his Applications to Congress have been referd to a Special Committee, and the necessary Steps are takeing to Answer the wishes and wants of the Southern States, and of our State in particular as far is practicable in the present Situation of affairs. We doubt not but that Gentleman will give you...
It is with much concern that we have learnt from your Excellency’s, and the Baron de Steuben’s letters to Congress, the misfortunes our Country has suffer’d from the Invasion under the command of the detestable Arnold, and that he has ventured with impunity even to our Capitol. We have some reason to Imagine that the same plan of operations which induced Clinton to send him there will occasion...
On the receipt of your favor of the 22d of February inclosing the Memorial of Mr. Stodder and Kerr with the protests and affidavits annexed, we communicated the matter to Congress, and have obtained an instruction to the Hon’ble Mr. Adams to represent the same to the States General of the United Provinces, and to claim such redress for the Memorialists as justice and the law of Nations...
We are Just informd from Genl. Varnum a Member now in Congress from Rhode Island that he has received Certain Intelligence that the Culloden of 74 Guns is drove on Shore and all her Crew except 17 men Perishd. The London of 90 Guns is driven out to Sea dismasted and two other 64 Gun Men of War Were dismasted entirely and all their Guns thrown over board in the late storm. Since writing the...
We have nothing new to communicate but what is contained in the inclosed paper except that a considerable Reinforcement from the Continental Army under the Command of the Marqs. la Fayette is on its march to join the Southern Army. This Force added to that now under Genl. Greene will we expect enable him to oppose Ld. Cornwallis or subdue the Traiter Arnold, to whichever object circumstances...
Since our last nothing new has happend except the Sailing of the French fleet Consisting of (as near as we can obtain intelligence) the Ships and Guns as ⅌ list enclosed together with about twelve Hundred of their Chosen troops which we flatter our selves are by this time actively and successfully employd in our Bay; And the departure of the M. de la Fayette with about the same Number of Men...
We enclose herewith a letter from Oliver Pollock Esqr. which will inform your Excellency of a very large claim which may soon be expected on the Treasury of Virginia. Mr. Nicholson Agent for Mr. Ross arrived here yesterday. We fear it will not be possible for him to get some of the most essential articles even if an exchange of his funds can be negociated, and that the difficulty of such an...
The Minister of France having imparted to Mr. Jones as Chairman of a Committee appointed to confer with him on some secret matters the intentions of Ct. Rochambeau and Mr. Destouches explained in the inclosed note, we thought it of such consequence that your Excellency should be certainly apprized of them, that notwithstanding the probability of the communication being made through some other...
Philadelphia , [ ca. 10] Dec. 1780. Enclosing a resolution of Congress of 6 Dec. relating to the Convention troops and also “a copy of a letter from G. Anderson found among the dead letters in the post office and communicated to Congress by the Postmaster. If there should be occasion for the original of the latter it shall be transmitted on the first intimation.” Imprisonment of Henry Laurens...
Having so lately and so often wrote to your Excellency we have little new to Communicate at present; the confusion respecting money still continues in this City, tho with less commotion than could be expected as in a few days the old Continental money has depreciated from two hundred to seven, eight, and some say nine Hundred for one, the new money has of course sufferd in proportion. What...
Philadelphia, 27 Apr. 1781 . “Having discovered that there were a considerable number of Rampart Arms belonging to the U:S. at this place, which have long lain dormant, (having been supposed useless for the Field,) we have found on enquiry that with a small alteration, and fixing Bayonettes to them they are capable of being renderd exceeding good Field Arms.” The Delegates undertook to arrange...
Printed excerpts ( Burnett, Letters Edmund C. Burnett, ed., Letters of Members of the Continental Congress (8 vols.; Washington, 1921–36). , VI, 38; and Stan. V. Henkels Catalogue No. 1078 [Feb. 14–15, 1913], item 430). On the receipt of your favor of the 22d of February inclosing the Memorial of Mr. Stodder and Kerr with the protests and affidavits annexed, we communicated the matter to...
The delegates have done all they could to hasten Wayne as well as to forward other assistance to our State foreseeing what occasion you would have for aid but could only get the Pen[nsy]lvanians under March very lately and a Resolution a few days past to send forward some Militia from this State and our Neighbour Maryland. Your situation no doubt you have occasionally communicated to the...
By the Speaker Harrison who arrived here the day before yesterday we were honored with your Excellency’s favor of the 26th. Ulto. We shall communicate your answer to the Baron d’Arendt, and if his claim against the State be supported by proper evidence shall take the best steps in our power to discharge it. A Vessel just arrived from Cadiz has brought Congress two letters from Mr. Carmichael ,...
The great depreciation of money and the extravagant prices of every thing here together with the difficulty of negociating Bills renders it absolutely necessary that some stable provision shoud be made, and some fixed mode adopted for supplying us with money. Other wise we shall not be able to exist. We shou’d be glad to be informed on this head as soon as possible. Tr ( Vi ), bearing notation...
Mr. Nicholson we presume will communicate to your Excellency or his principal the State of the business committed to his care. He has we believe been greatly embarrass’d for want of money, and it has not been in our power to afford him assistance, although our endeavours have been exerted for the purpose. The Chevr. Luzerne has received within a few days past Dispatches from his Court. The...
We were honored yesterday with your Excellency’s favor of the 15th. inst: inclosing Mr. Anderson’s explanation of his letter to Capt. Trott, and that of the 18th. enclosing instructions as to the Mississippi and requesting sundry military supplies, in promoting which no exertions shall be omitted on our part. Your Excellency’s letter to Congress on the subject of the Convention Prisoners and...
Fragment of RC (Virginia State Library). Written by Meriwether Smith but signed only by JM. with no Difficulty in arbitrating [the dis]pute, as he admitted the Facts state[d as] agreed between you; and acquiesced in the Gentleman proposed, but contrary to our Expectation we received a Letter from him a Copy of which is enclosed and also our answer to it. You [will] see by these Letters the...
We have been favord with Your Excellencys enclosing a State of the affair between Mr. Nathan and the Commonwealth of Virginia which we are endeavoring to put in train for a decision on the Principles you have been pleased to direct, the event of which Your Excellency shall be informd of as soon as tis decided. The Unfortunate consequences which have attended the Naval engagement of Chesapeake...
Printed text ( Burnett, Letters Edmund C. Burnett, ed., Letters of Members of the Continental Congress (8 vols.; Washington, 1921–36). , VI, 110). Written by Joseph Jones and signed by Jones and Theodorick Bland. JM most probably agreed with what his colleagues reported. For this reason the absence of his signature should not bar this extract from inclusion in his correspondence as a delegate....
RC ( LC : Continental Congress Miscellany, portfolio 103). Written by JM and signed by JM and Joseph Jones. Addressed to “His Excellency The Governor of Virginia” and docketed by a clerk, “Delegates for Virga. in Congress Mar. 6th. 1781 AD.” There appears in Joseph Jones’s hand, at the close of the text of the letter, “Phila: 6th Mar: 1781.” Jefferson may have momentarily overlooked this...
RC (Historical Society of Pennsylvania). Written by Bland and signed by JM and Bland. Addressed to “His Excellency Thomas Jefferson Esqr. Governor of Virginia” and franked by JM. Docketed, “Colo Blands Lr. March 81.” Since our last nothing new has happened except the sailing of the French fleet Consisting of (as near as we can obtain intelligence) the Ships and Guns as p[er] list inclosed...
The inclosed resolution of Congress answers your Excellency’s letter of the 26th ulto., relating to the appointment of Col: Davies to the War Office of Virginia. You will observe that it determines his rank in the Army alone, to be the bar to his acceptance of a civil office. Should Col: Davies be willing to give up that, and his place be supplied by one of the supernumerary Colonels, So that...
RC (Virginia State Library). Written by JM and signed by JM, Theodorick Bland, and Meriwether Smith. Docketed, “Letter from Delegates 1 May 1781, Not answerd.” We enclose herewith a letter from Oliver Pollock Esqr: which will inform your Excellency of a very large claim which may soon be expected on the Treasury of Virginia. Mr. Nicholson Agent for Mr. Ross arrived here yesterday. We fear it...
RC (Historical Society of Pennsylvania). Written and signed by JM, “By order of the delegation.” Docketed, “Jas Madisons Letter Recd May 81.” The Executive of New Jersey in consequence of authority vested in them by the Legislature for that purpose, by an Act of the 27th. Ulto. established the rate of exchange between the old continental currency and the bills issued pursuant to the Act of...
RC (Historical Society of Pennsylvania). Addressed to “His Excelly. Thos. Jefferson Esqr. Govr. of Virginia.” Except for Meriwether Smith’s signature, the entire letter is in Theodorick Bland’s hand. In the editors’ opinion, this dispatch was from JM as well as his two colleagues, and the omission of his signature reflects merely his momentary absence at the time the letter was sealed. Having...
RC (Virginia State Library). Written by Theodorick Bland and signed by JM and Bland. Bland inadvertently dated it “1771” rather than 1781. Addressed to “His Excelly Thos. Jefferson Esqr. Govr of the State of Virginia” and franked by Bland. Docketed by a clerk, “James Madison’s Ltr April 12th. 1781.” We have been favord with Your Excellencys enclosing a State of the affair between Mr. Nathan...