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I have recd your favour of March 8 with the Letter inclosed, for which I thank you. Inclosed is a Letter to one of your Domesticks Joseph Dougherty. Had you read the Papers inclosed they might have given you a moment of Melancholly or at least of Sympathy with a mourning Father. They relate wholly to the Funeral of a son who was once the delight of my Eyes and a darling of my heart, cutt off...
Had you been no other than the private inhabitant of Monticelo, I should e’er this time, have addrest you with that Sympathy which a recent even has awakened in my Bosom, but reasons of various kinds withheld my pen, untill the powerfull feelings of my Heart, burst through the restraints, and call’d upon me to shed the tear of sorrow over the departed remains of your beloved and deserving...
your Letter of June 13th came duly to hand; if it had contained no other Sentiments and opinions than those which my Letter of condolence could have excited, and which are expressed in the first page of your reply,. our correspondence would have terminated here: but you have been pleased to enter upon some Subjects which call for a reply: and as you observe that you have wished for an...
Your Letter of July 22d. was by some mistake in the post office at Boston sent back as far as Newyork, so that it did not reach me untill the Eleventh of this Month. Candour requires of me a reply. Your statment respecting Callender, and your motives for liberating him wear a different aspect as explaind by you, from the impression which it had made; not only upon my mind, but upon the minds...
your Letter of July 22d was by some mistake in the post office at Boston sent back as far as Newyork, so that it did not reach me untill the eleventh of this Month. Candour requires of me a reply. your statement respecting Callender, (who was the wretch referd to) and your motives for liberating him, wear a different aspect as explaind by you, from the impression which they had made, not only...
Sickness for three weeks past, has prevented my acknowledging the receipt of your Letter of Septr. 11th. when I first addrest you, I little thought of entering into a correspondence with you upon Subjects of a political nature. I will not regret it, as it has led to some elucidations and brought on some explanations, which place in a more favorable light, occurrences which had wounded me....
Since my last which went by the mail in course, the papers of my deceased father have been opened. His will was made thirteen years ago, since which two of my brothers have died, one of them leaving a large number of children mostly minors, and both of them intestate. The will itself, besides the lapsed legacies, does not cover all the property held at the time; & valuable parcels of property...
Your favor of the 17th. came to hand by the last mail. You will find us at home on saturday. It would have been expedient on some accounts to have set out before that day, but it has been rendered impossible by several circumstances, particularly by an attack on my health which kept me in bed 3 or 4 days, and which has not yet permitted me to leave the House. I hope to be able to begin the...
I suggested some time ago to Col. Habersham the objections to a Contract for 4 years for carrying the mail. His reply was that frequent contracts would not only be very troublesome, but by lessening the value of contracts, discourage good undertakers. He added that a clause in the contracts reserved to him a right at all time to make any of regulations he might chuse, making at the same time...
9 July 1801, Baltimore. Warns that Habersham’s changes in the mail route from Philadelphia to Pittsburgh greatly alarm and distress citizens of Carlisle and Shippensburg and appear to be a plot to make Jefferson’s administration unpopular there. Conveys political intelligence: “Mr. Montgomery says he has now little Doubt but Harford County will give himself & another Republican Elector.” RC (...
The following memoranda, & the inclosed letter from Mr. Dallas will present to the President the state of the information in the office of State on the subject of the indictmt. under the sedition act agst. Duane, at the request of the Senate. The President will observe, that another prosecution agst. him, at Common law , is pending in the same Court. 16. May. 1800. Mr: Lee’s letter to Mr....
It is objected that the act of Congress Mar. 3. 1800. c. 14. sect. 1. 2. entitles a citizen owner of a vessel to restitution until the vessel has been condemned by competent authority on paying salvage to the captor. Every man, by the law of nature, and every fellow citizen by compact, is bound to assist another against violence to his person or property. Tho’ therefore by the law of nature...
Docr. Rose being about to call at Monticello I prefer a conveyance by him to the mail, for the papers herewith enclosed, as I shall thereby be saved the necessity of having a messenger at the Ct. House in time to catch the arrival of the post. I have recd: yours of the 7th. inst. Having been before applied to by a letter from Hembold, on the subject of printing the laws in his German...
Mrs. Tudor (the lady of Judge Tudor of Boston) with her son, intending to be at Monticello this evening or tomorrow, I entrust to them the inclosed papers, which will thus reach you a little earlier, than if detained for the mail, by which I shall again write to you. In the mean time I remain Yours most respectfully & Affy. RC ( ViU : Jefferson Papers). Cover marked by JM, “Mr. Tudor”;...
Inclosed herewith are several letters & papers for perusal. Among the former you are troubled with another from Thornton. You will observe that the Declaration of the Master of the British Vessel carried into Boston, states only that the Prisoners were French Spanish Danish &c &c. without saying whether they were taken in the French service, or that of their respective countries. This...
I have duly recd. yours of Aug. 22. with the papers sent with it. I have heard nothing from Dallas on the subject of another prosecution agst. Duane. It is to be presumed that he will either commence it, or let us know his reason for not doing so. Should further silence take place, I will jog his attention. I know nothing of Clay personally. All I know thro’ others is in his favor, and speak...
I sent you yesterday by Docr. Bache a packet recd. by the mail of last week, that it might the less interfere with what you receive directly. I avail myself of another private opportunity to forward the communications recd. by the mail of yesterday, by which means the further advantage will be obtained, of gaining a week in those cases which require your sanction, and which need not go back...
The mail of wednesday brought the despatches from France which ought to have come in the preceding one. I inclose them with sundry other letters &c. They would have been sent yesterday but an express could not readily be procured. I have engaged the Bearer a free negro of good character to deliver them to you as early today as he can accomplish the ride. He is to receive a dollar & a half per...
The Messenger delivered me about 9 OC. on saturday evening the packet with your letters of Sepr. 11 & 12. I join in your opinion that the suspicions of Murray in the letters inclosed in the former are too harsh to be probable. Still his situation may produce feelings & views not coincident with ours, and strengthens the policy of getting the Chancellor on the ground as soon as possible. I hear...
I make use of the oppy. by Mr. Davis to forward you the contents of the weekly packet recd yesterday from the Office of State. Having had time scarcely to read some of the communications, I am unable, if there were occasion, to submit comments on them. Mr. Wagner writes that Mr. Graham left Washington on saturday last with the papers relating to the Mission of Mr. Livingston, and was to be...
Having sent you by Mr. Davis the communications recd. by the mail of last week, I have none to make you at present. You will find me at home, on saturday or sunday, when I hope to be able to fix the day for following you to Washington. The despatches for Mr. Livingston will be ready by the time I shall have the pleasure of seeing you. My conversation with Mr. Graham who staid a day or two with...
Mr. Kemble followed you on tuesday afternoon, with the despatches for Mr. Livingston & Mr. Pinkney, & I hope arrived in time to get them to N. York before the frigate could sail. By detaining him no time was lost as he was employed in making fair copies, otherwise to be made in the office, & as by reposing himself & his horse he could return the more expeditiously. The distribution of the...
J. Madison presents his respects to the President with a letter from Col. Burr & another from Col. Humphreys. The latter is a duplicate, with an exception of the postscript. J. M. has been so much indisposed since saturday evening that he could not call on the President, as he wished, in order to consult his intentions as to Mr. Thornton’s letter. If the President proposes to make it the...
I have the honor to transmit herewith two copies of the second census (except for the State of Tennessee, which is not yet received) and to notice the following deviations from the law under which it was taken, affecting the uniformity of some of the returns. The return for the counties of Dutchess, Ulster & Orange in the District of New York was not recd. at this office until the 21st. of...
J. M. havg received notice this afternoon of the oppy. by a packet, has hastily written to Mr. King. The President will please to read it & return it as soon as possible, that if approved, it may be got into the Mail tonight, witht. which the oppy. will be lost. RC ( DLC : Jefferson Papers). Docketed by Jefferson as received 10 Dec. 1801.
J. Madison’s respectful compliments to the President It appears that the Secy. of State, the Secy. of the Treasury, & the Attorney General were appd. Commissrs. to settle with Georgia, by their names, but with their official titles annexed. On the resignation of Col. Pickering, Mr. Marshal was appd. in his room , No resignation of his Commission for the Georgia business being referred to or...
11 January 1802, Department of State. Encloses an estimate of the cost of carrying into effect the convention with France. RC and enclosure, two copies ( DNA : RG 46, President’s Messages, 7A-E3; and DNA : RG 233, President’s Messages, 7A-D1). Each RC 1 p., in a clerk’s hand, signed by JM. Enclosed estimate (1 p.) lists expenses totaling $350,000, not including $32,839.54 worth of repairs to...
I have the honor to enclose a letter from the Secretary of the Treasury to me, together with the documents accompanying it, containing an account of the monies drawn out of the Treasury under the several appropriations made for defraying the expenses incident to the intercourse with the Mediterranean powers, and statements of the credits obtained or claimed at the Treasury by the persons to...
The Secretary of State has the honor to lay before the President of the United States, copies of the following documents, viz. A Schedule containing a statement of the suits, in the Circuit Court for Maryland, ending with November term last. A similar statement of suits in the District Court for Kentucky, ending with March term last. A certificate of the Clerk of the Circuit Court for West...
The Secretary of State, to whom has been referred by the President of the United States a Resolution of the House of Representatives of the 23d Inst., requesting the President to communicate to that House such information as he may have received relative to the Copper mines on the South side of Lake Superior, in pursuance of a Resolution of the 16th. April 1800, authorising the appointment of...
The Secretary of State, to whom has been referred by the President of the United States a Resolution of the Senate passed on the 12th. day of this Month, requesting the President to cause to be laid before the Senate the Amount of claims preferred under the seventh Article of the Treaty of Amity, Commerce & Navigation with Great Britain, and of the sums awarded by the Commissioners and paid by...
The Secretary of State respectfully reports to the President the information requested by the Resolution of the House of Representatives, of the 8th of January last relative to Spoliations committed on the Commerce of the United States, under Spanish authority; and also, relative to the imprisonment of the American Consul at Saint Jago de Cuba. This Report has been delayed longer than was...
We have the Honor to enclose a copy of an Agreement enter’d into between the Commissioners of the United States and those of Georgia, in pursuance of the Act entitled “An Act supplemental to the Act entitled ’An Act for an amicable settlement of Limits, with the State of Georgia; and authorizing The Establishment of a Government in the Mississippi Territory. [’”] The nature & Importance of the...
Mr. Lear arrived here the day before yesterday a few minutes after your departure. He confirms the information as to the imprisonment of Capt: Rodgers & Davidson. Inclosed is a copy of le Clerc’s explanation on the subject, of my letter to Pichon with his answer, and of a letter to Mr. Livingston which I shall forward to Philada. this evening, that it may overtake the despatches already in the...
I have nothing new since my last either from Europe or the W. Indies. The elections in N. York are not yet finally known. It is suggested that the efforts of the minority have prevailed beyond the apprehensions of the majority. Cabot accepts his mission on the terms proposed to him. I have just recd. letters from Erving shewing the turn which the affair took in London, to be such as was...
The President having called on the heads of Departments for their opinion in writing whether certain charges made by Col. Worthington against Governor St. Clair, be or be not established; and whether such as are established, be sufficiently weighty to render the removal of the Governor proper? the Secretary of State respectfully submits his opinion as follows; Charge 1. Forming new Counties &...
On consultation with the Secretary of the Navy, it has been concluded that the public service will be favored by sending the ship the General Greene, with the provisions & gun-carriages destined for the Mediterranean, instead of chartering a private vessel for the occasion. It has occurred also that as the period at which an annual remittance to Algiers will become due, will arrive before the...
I inclose several letters for you put into my hands by Mr. Pichon, with some communications of his own, which are proper to be forwarded along with them. I inclose also a letter from Mr Jones at Gaudaloupe, and two others declining commissions of Bankruptcy. My departure from this place, suspended for a day by preparations for the Mediterranean business stated in my last, has since been...
I reached home just before dark this evening, after the most fatiguing journey I ever encountered, having made the tour I proposed over the mountains, and met with every difficulty which bad roads & bad weather could inflict. As this must be at the Court House early in the morning, I have only time to inclose you some despatches from Mr. Livingston which I recd. the night before I left...
I red. last evening your two favors of the 9 & 13th. Before I left Washington I wrote to Simpson approving his refusal of passports in the cases required by the Emperor, and understood that the instructions from the Navy Dept. to Commodore Morris were founded on the same principle. It is to be inferred therefore that we are no longer on a footing of Amity with Morocco: and I had accordingly...
Your favor of the 16th. came duly to hand with the papers to which it referred. I now forward others recd. by the last mail. I have signified to Mr. Sumpter that his resignation was acquiesced in, and have used a language calculated to satisfy him that he retains the good opinion of the Executive. What is to be said to Mr. Livingston on his request that he may appt. a private Secretary, and...
The inclosed letters will shew the object of the Bearer Mr. Baker. From his conversation, I find that, placing Bourdeaux & Gibralter out of view, he wishes to be appd. as Consul, to Minorca, where he says a Consul will be admitted, now that it is again under the Spanish Government, and where he observes a consul may be of use to the U. States, particularly during our bicker⟨in⟩gs with the...
Yours of the 23d. has been duly recd. Mr. Brent had informed me that copies of the letters from the Mediterranean had been sent to you by Mr. Smith, and therefore I did not send the originals by express. The declaration of a rupture by the Empr. of Morocco, put me at a loss what to say to Simson on the subject of the Gun carriages, and how to decide as to the letter you left with me. As the...
Yours of the 27. came duly to hand. I had recd. the letter from W. Hampton & F. Maury. I had proposed to observe to them, that the case fell wholly within the State laws, & that it was probable the several Governors would be led to attend to it by the correspondence between the Mayor of N. Y. & the French consul & Admiral. It had occurred also that it might not be amiss for the President to...
The mail not having returned from Milton when my messenger left the Court House on monday evening, & it having been inconvenient to send thither at any time since, I can not now acknowledge any favor which may have come from you since my last. Among the letters inclosed is one from Higginson seconding the application from Philada. for your patronage to a demand on the vice Govt of the La plata...
I have duly recd. yours of the 30th. Ulto. with the several papers to which it refers. I have directed the commissions for Shore & Bloodgood to be made out, and have sent the extract from Clark’s letter as you required to Genl. Dearborn. He had however been made acquainted with it by Mr. Brent, before the letter was forwarded to me. May it not be as well to let the call for the Dockets be a...
Yours of the 6th. instant was duly brought by the last mail. I inclose under cover to Mr. Brent, the answers to the Merchts. of Boston & Philada., which if approved you will be so good as to seal & send on to him. I inclose also a letter from Mr. Brent to me, for the sake of the explanation it gives relative to the consulate at Nantz. If Mr. Grant should not go, it is to be recollected that...
Yours of the 10th. is duly recd. I answered by duplicates Mr. Sumter’s resignation as soon as it had been submitted to you. Mr. Livingston’s request that he may appt. a successor has not yet been answered. It is probable he will expect to know your determination in the first letter that may be written to him. The blanks of which Mr. Brent reminded you, came to me from you some time ago, and...
I have duly recd. yours of the 13th. I had been apprised of the application by the Mayor of N Y. for a guard. Considering as you do, that the federal Govt. have only an incidental connection with the case of the French Negroes, I have waited for more particular information concerning them, before writing to Pichon, who I learnt from Mr. Brent, and also from himself, was exerting himself to get...
The Secretary of State, to whom the Resolution of the House of Representatives of the United States of the 17th inst, was referred by the President, has the honor to inclose to him, the letters and communications annexed from the Governor of the Mississippi Territory, the Governor of Kentucky and from Wm E. Hulings formerly appointed Vice Consul of the United States at New Orleans. In addition...