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Documents filtered by: Recipient="Jefferson, Thomas" AND Period="Jefferson Presidency"
Results 1531-1560 of 10,578 sorted by author
Application having lately been made to me by Mr. Dunbar—to obtain from the Marquis of Casa Calvo, a Passport for the Gentlemen who are about to ascend the Red River, under your Orders, I addressed to him a letter, of which the enclosure A is a copy, and received the answer marked B.—I have informed Mr. Dunbar of the Marquis’s refusal which I presume may occasion, for the present, the...
In a former Letter, I mentioned the Opinions of certain Lawyers of Philadelphia, upon the subject of the Batture, which Mr Livingston was promulgating in this City for the purpose of influencing the public sentiment.—I now enclose a private Copy of “A Memoire par M. Du Ponceau, Jurisconsulte á Philadelphie,” together with a Response in Manuscript by Mr Thiery Editor of the Louisiana Courier.—I...
In a letter which I had the honor to address you from Natchez, I inclosed an extract from the Journal of the House of Representatives of this Territory, in which Messrs. Guerin & Levandeau were recommended as Councellors in the Room of James Mather Senior resigned.—I believe in the Letter alluded to, I took the liberty to recommend Mr. Levandeau, as best meriting your confidence;—But since my...
By a late mail I received from the Secretary of the Treasury a letter concerning the Bank proposed to be established in this Territory, and find with sincere concern; that he is much dissatisfied with the measure. He questions the authority by which the scheme was sanctioned,—expresses apprehensions that it may defeat a project in contemplation, of establishing a Branch of the United States...
I have only time by this days mail, to acknowledge the Receipt of your agreeable favors of the 17th and 18th of July, and to add, that I will with all possible dispatch, give you all the Information I can acquire, in relation to the Province of Louisiana. I pray you Sir, to receive my sincere congratulations on the success of Mr. Monroe’s mission;—The Island of Orleans and the extensive...
Permit me the honor of introducing to your acquaintance, Mr. Joshua Lewis—one of the Land Commissioners for the district of Orleans. It is reported, that, since the arrival of Morales at the Town of Mobile, the navigation of the Mobile river, by American Vessels, has been objected to:—The report, however, wants confirmation. It is also rumoured, that the Spaniards at Nacogdoches, having taken...
I have received your favours of the 10th. and 14th. of March, and am indeed happy to find that the ungenerous calumnies to which I have been subjected, have not made on your mind impressions unfavorable towards me.—I am aware that abuse , much abuse is the constant attendant on Office, under our Government; I have endeavored to meet it with compossure—But when I perceived a political conduct...
Edward Livingston sailed two days since in a vessel bound to Philadelphia , & from whence he proceeds to the City of Washington.—His object is (as reported) to have a personal conference with you upon several subjects private & political;—Among the former, the case of the Batture will be introduced;—among the latter, the acts of General Wilkinson during the winter of 1806, & of the Territorial...
I am now on my excursion to the Several Counties, and hope to accomplish my Journey in a short time;—Unless indeed I should be arrested by Indisposition which is not improbable, for the Summer’s Heat is oppressive, and dangerous to travelers.— Mr. Graham after a series of misfortune put into the Havanna’, & from whence he sailed for the United States on the 15th. Ultimo—I hope Mr. Graham will...
My Administration here, from the time of my Arrival in Louisiana, to the close of the late provisional Government, has already became an object of some discussion: to this I can have no objection; I wou’d rather court it, were I assur’d, that the Enquiries wou’d be conducted with Candour.—but some publications have appear’d here upon the subject, in which, I do not think Justice has been...
My friend mr. Ribelt who returns to the United States under an apprehension that he has met with some heavy domestic misfortune, can give you much interesting information as to the state of things in this quarter. The Troops ordered to this Territory,— with the aid of the Militia,—are—in my opinion, amply sufficient to repel any force which our Spanish Neighbours could, at present,...
Before my departure from this Post, I cannot deny myself the pleasure of addressing to you a private and inofficial Letter.— Information of the Mission to New-Orleans , with which you honored me, I received on the evening of the 17’th Ultimo, and the measures which I have taken since that period, have been faithfully detailed to you by my Communications to the Department of State.—The...
I now inclose you a copy of the correspondence which prece’ded the meeting between Mr. Clark & myself, & I sincerely hope you may find therein some apology for my conduct. I feel, as if I had been rashly imprudent;—But there are some considerations, which altho’ they do not justify me, yet (in my own opinion) they go far in extenuation.— From my earliest entry into public Life, I have been in...
My feelings have led me to an act which I fear may subject me to your censure. I was engaged on the 8th. instant in a Duel with Mr. Daniel Clark. The affair took place within the Florida line, and at the first fire, I received a ball which passed through my right thigh about ten inches below the hip, and made a considerable contusion in my left. Fortunately the bone was not injured, and altho’...
My letters to the Secretaries of State and War have acquainted you with the state of things in this quarter.— The case of the Batture continues a source of uneasiness to the Louisianians, and unless Mr. Livingston is arrested in his operations, the Port of New Orleans may sustain injury.—This subject was lately before a Grand Jury, and their opinion conveyed in a Presentment, of which the...
Since my letter of the 5th. Instant advising you of the death of my esteemed friend J. W. Gurley, Mr. Robertson has consented to act as Attorney General, but with an intention of holding it no longer, that a suitable Character can be selected to fill the office permanently.— If the appointment of Register of the Land office, which is now vacant, should be confered on Mr. Robertson, I am...
  I have the honor to introduce to your acquaintance, Major Fortier, an Inhabitant of this City, and a very useful and worthy member of our Society.   Major Fortier has acted as one of my Aid de Camps from the period of my first arrival in this City, to the present day—and I have found in him the character of an active officer, a good american, and an honest amiable young man. With sentiments...
On this day at 7 O’clock, I sat out from Mr. Fortiers, and arrived at noon, at the house of Mr. Truards, the Judge of the County Court, for the County of German Coast. Judge Truard had invited to his house, the Justices of the Peace, and the other Civil officers of the County, & with whom I had the honor to dine.—The day passed pleasantly away, and I was pleased to find, that the American...
I have forwarded you by the Ship Fame bound to Baltimore, a small Box containing a few Fossils &c. collected by a Mr. “Richard King on his excursion to the Hot Springs, on the Ouachita River,” and of which I solicit your Acceptance.— Mr. King in his Letter to me, speaking of the Hot Springs—observes—“These Springs form the most extraordinary Phenomenon in the World. The Water is hot almost to...
Since the 12th. Ultimo Messrs. Poidrass Morgan and Watkins have been attending in the City with a view of meeting in Council in conformity to my Proclamation. Messrs. Kenner and Wikoff (who from fear of the Fever had avoided the City) appeared a few days since. These five gentlemen are all who of the original Thirteen named as Councillors thought proper to accept. The situation of things here...
Since my last letter to you, I have greatly recovered my health, and I have the pleasure to add, that Mrs. Claiborne is now pronounced by her Physicians to be out of danger.—The fever continues to prevail here; but within a few days it has assumed a milder shape, and in several instances has yielded to medicine. The mortality during the last month was principally confined to Strangers;—but on...
Mr. Clark has arrived, and every exertion is making to induce him, to take a violent part against the late proceedings here; A splendid Dinner has been given him, at which Edward Livingston presided as President, assisted by Mr Phil: Jones, and Mr. Ross a dismissed Sheriff.—Among the Guests were, the Judges of the Superior Court, and James Workman late Judge of the County of Orleans; The...
I am honored with the receipt of your interesting letter of the 27. of April. The arrangement of our Militia, which was recommended to Congress, was well calculated for the defence of our Country, and it is regretted by me that the system was not approved. The proposition which was submitted to Congress, with a view to the immediate settlement of a part of this Territory by American Citizens ,...
Captain Cammack of the Marine Corps being order’ed to the City of Washington, I cannot avoid testifying to you my entire approbation of his Conduct while on this Station, and recommending him to your notice as an officer of merit and Talents;—He has for some time commanded the Marines at New-Orleans, & while his own Department has been uniformly correct, the most exact discipline has been...
I persuade myself that my letters of the 12th and 24th of August, have reached you in safety. I have not yet been enabled to procure Romane’s map of Louisiana, and I fear the Geographical sketches which were promised me, by a Gentleman residing at Nachitoches on the Red River will not be forwarded. This Gentleman is a Doctor Sibly, formerly of North Carolina, and a man of good general...
At the request of Mr. Julian Poidrass and of Mr. Pierre Derminon, Judge of the Parish of Point Coupie, I have the honor to transmit you the enclosed Address , signed by a number of the respectable Inhabitants (Planters) of Point Coupie, and which I am persuaded conveys a sincere expression of their sentiments on the subject to which it relates. With sentiments of great respect I have the honor...
At the particular request of Peter Pedisclaux, a Recorder of Mortgages, and a Notary public in this city I take the liberty to forward to you, the enclosed petition and the documents accompanying it. On my arrival in this city, I found the offices of Mr. Pedisclaux shut, and himself invested with no appointment under the administration of M. Laussat the Colonial Prefect. Mr. Pedisclaux was an...
A few days since, I visited the settlement of Terre-au-Boeuf, so called from a Creek or Bayou on which it is situated, and where formerly the Buffalos ranged.– This Bayou lies to the East of the Mississippi, and is about 22 miles in length; It makes from Lake Born, & communicates with the Mississippi about fifteen miles below New-Orleans; The Bayou is at present nearly dry, but when the River...
I have the honor to enclose you, an address from the House of Representatives of the Mississippi Territory, and the pleasure to add, that the Sentiments it contains, are in unison with the feelings of a great majority of the Citizens of this Territory.— I am persuaded, an opinion generally prevails in this District, that the Liberty, Peace, & safety of our Country, greatly depend upon the...
I have the pleasure to announce the arrival of Judge Hall; he reached this City three days ago; and on this Morning, I delivered him his Commission, and administered the oaths of Office. The death of Colonel Kirbey is really an event I greatly lament; But I persuade myself his vacancy will soon be filled by an able and judicious Judge.—Mr. Prevost is attentive to his duties, and his decisions...