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Understanding from the public prints, that you are at Monticello, we avail ourselves of the direct conveyance to intrude on you our communications of the 25th ult , and of this day , to the secretary of War; and we hope you may approve of this deviation from the regular course of our correspondence, which we hazard, with the intent to secure time, for the seasonable arrival of any order you...
presuming that a sample of the Waters of the Mississippi & Arkansaw Rivers, remarkable for their difference to each other & to the Waters of all other Rivers within my Knowledge, may not be unacceptable to you, I avail myself of a conveyance by Doctor Carmichael of the Army, who will have the Honor to deliver this, to send you a Bottle of each, taken from those Rivers in their lowest & least...
Your kind invitation to dinner this Day, increases the mortification I experience, from not being able to pay my respects to you—An affection of my Head & Breast, which I have resisted several Days, compeled me last Evening to lose blood & I am now under the operation of medicine—I lament the sudden departure of Baron Humbolt as I feel a strong Interest in having his answers to the quere?...
about 130 Leagues above the Cado nation & 230 from Natchitoches, we have discovered on either side the Red River, Cliffs of rock Salt—we also find several salt springs above this point & one below it, which discharge themselves into the River, & actually give a brackish taste to its Waters, as low down as the settlement of Natchitoches, during the recess of the floods, or rather before their...
General Wilkinson has the Honor to submit, to the private Inspection of the President, Portraits of several prominent Characters in Louisiana, (the Territory of Orleans) from the Pens of the Gentlemen, strangers to each other, of different Nations & opposite prejudices—The one a French Man, the other an Atlantic American—But both of them, decidedly opposed to the French Government, & as...
I regret that Indisposition should have prevented the earlier acknowledgment of your obliging Note of the 3rd. Inst., and I hope it may not be unreasonable at this time, to submit to you the following brief remarks, in reply to that note.— Mr. Borés intemperate conduct may be imputed to national prejudice, to a false estimate of his own importance, & a delusive reliance on the maternal...
I regret that a variety of interruptions & engagements, should have so long prevented my attention, to the subject you did me the Honor to mention to me. On turning it in my Mind the Idea occurred to me that your proposition could not be better sustained, than by an examination of the System of defences, heretofore adopted for our Towns & Harbours, and a comparative view of its merits with...
In a case which excites the sharpest self-reproach & exposes me to severe reprehension, I venture to address myself directly to you, with the hope that you may spare me the publick humiliation, which I have merited by an inexcusable (tho innocent) omission of Duty. The precise injunctions of the Law, relatively to the Oath of Office I am to take, as Governor of the Territory of Louisiana, had...
The Bearer hereof Capt. Amos Stoddard, who conducts the Indian deputation on their visit to you, has charge of a few natural productions of this Territory, to amuse a leisure Moment, and also a Savage delineation on a Buffaloe Pelt, of the Missouri & its South Western Branches, including the Rivers plate & Lycorne or Pierre jaune; This Rude Sketch without Scale or Compass “et remplie de...
I have the Honor to enclose you a list of the Articles transmited you by Captain Stoddard, which may I hope afford you an Hours amusement.— The Cotton Tree (Populus Deltoide of Bartram) is rarely to be found above limestone on the Ohio, but abounds on the Bottom of that River below the Rapids, and on the Mississippi & Missouri as high up as I have been—The favourite Soil of this Tree is...
The opposition of a party of Kances Indians, to a small detachment destined up the Missouri, for the purpose of returning to their respective Nations, the Riccari & otto Chiefs, sent down last Spring by Captain Lewis, puts it in my Power to introduce the former to You. From observation & the limited Enquiry to which I am confined by an illiterate Interpreter, I think you may be able to derive...
Could I be so vain as to impute aught of personal regard, to the generous & paternal support which you have recently given to my official pretensions, I should not hesitate to implore you to forbear the indulge of every sympathy towards me, which might cause you one single Enemy, however undeserved or contemptible—Dispose of me Sir as your private Interests, or the National Service may...
I find from a public print lately established in Kentucky, the main object of which is the ensuing presidential Election, That the cause of Easton, Case, Lucas, Hammond & other Mal Contents of Louisiana, has made a powerful acquisition in the Pen of John Wood, by whom I have “en passant” been bespattered with Obloquy, & slandered with a degree of virulence & indecency surpassing all example,...
Whatever may be the general impropriety, I pursuade myself that on a Subject irrelative to my official obligations, I shall be excused for addressing you directly & confidentially; But I have another & a more cogent reason, for deviating, in this instance, from the ordinary course of my Correspondence; It is possible the momentous occasion of this Letter, & the vital importance attached to it,...
The following information appears to rest on such broad and explicit grounds, as to exclude all doubts of its authenticity: A numerous and powerful association, extending from New York through the western states to the territory bordering on the Mississippi, has been formed with the design to levy and rendezvous eight or ten thousand men in New Orleans at a very near period; and from thence,...
I again intrude upon you the subject of the duplicate under cover, which presents a spectacle of human depravity, to excite our sorrow, indignation and abhorrence. Many circumstances have intervened since my last, confirmatory of the information previously received, and demonstrative of a deep, dark and wicked conspiracy. My doubts have ceased, and it is my opinion, that nought but an...
Claiborne appears to be properly impressed par le awful crisis which awaits us, and promises every support in his power. Les troops are behind moi 145.24 & la 195.4 321.14   a commencer. My difficulties are stupendous—my means to be provided—my time prompt unthriving and the occasion urgent and critical. Mais une good cause—the favour du ciel—religious and patriotic hearts 126.19 work wonders....
I must trust to the peculiar delicacy and difficulty of my situation for the motive and the excuse of this third intrusion on the same momentous subject.—Between the alternatives of waiting for instructions from the proper department (whose last orders to me bear date the 9th. of June) until from the feeble and defenceless condition in which I find this place, the enemy should gain the portal...
Accompanied by governor Claiborne, I, a few minutes since, met the merchants of the city, and in a short address, to which my sensibilities gave direction, I explained to them the causes which had produced the assembly of the troops at this place, and the preparations which were making to fortify the town; painted to them, in glowing colors, the impending dangers which menaced the city and...
Capt. Stille late of the army—declares that speaking to Mr. Granger in Baltimore Concerning his route to this Country, he Mr. Granger observed to him, why You will be at the Falls of the ohio about the time the Grand Flotilla will reach it—He Capt. Stille enquired what flotilla? Mr. Granger answered have You not heard of the Grand flotilla preparing at Marietta & else where—on Capt. Stille’s...
“A moment of awful suspense has arrived. Mr. Burr’s letter to Mr. Mead, of the 12th instant, transmitted to the secretary of war, is not indicative of doubts, fears or despondence; and if he is able to put off Mr. Mead for four or five days from the present, we may expect unpleasant scenes to ensue. The friends of Mr. Burr and my enemies, labour at this moment to stamp on the public mind that...
I last Evening had the Honor to receive your Letter of the 3rd. Ultmo., & rejoice at M: Briggs’s safe arrival, however unseasonable, for I had begun to feel serious concern for his safety.— You must long before this Period have heard of the salutary decision, to which I have been driven in this City, and of the persecution & abuse I have suffered & am suffering in consequence thereof: The late...
I have the Honor to inclose you a duplicate of my Letter of the 13th. Inst., transmitted by the last Mail, and in obedience to your desire, I avail myself of the conveyance by Judge Sprigg, to forward you one of Burr’s original Letters to me, and by the next safe conveyance, I will transmit you a literal Interpretation of it duly attested, which I have not yet taken time to render to my...
I have the Honor to transmit you a duplicate of my last, & to inform you, that Judge Sprigg having declined his voyage, after He had taken his passage; and the conveyance both by the Mail & by the Ocean, having become too in ence for the transmittal of original documents, I shall avail myself of the return of an officer on furlough who will leave this shortly, to transmit you the Letters you...
I transmit this by a Vessel bound to Baltimore, to cover a duplicate of my letter of the 26th. Ulto. and to trespass some further details on your patience. The enclosed Extract of a letter from S. Dinsmore, will apprize you of the State of things at Natchez, and particularly the Situation of Blennerhassett, Tyler, Ralston and Floyd. Should these men be left to the Mummery of a trial, before a...
I have just received your Original Letter, of the 3d. of January, and Sincerely congratulate you on the Arrest of Burr, though I fear from the route by which he has been Sent, that you Will never find him at Washington. The popular feelings, His extreme art and desperation conspire to favor his escape. Mr. Gaines has certainly done for the best, but I should have prefered to Send him by Sea....
You will find under cover the Report I have promised, and I flatter myself you will not condemn the manner, in which it has been obtained. I beg to refer you for Mr. Burling Character (not a common one) to General S. Smith who has long Known Him—On my own part I profess to you, I consider Him the pure Patriot, & hardly to be equaled in any Enterprize which Interests His feelings; and yet he is...
Milligan the Express delivered me Your Letter of the 3rd. Ultmo. the Evening of the 14th. Inst:, which lifted from my Breast a load of anxeity, and I will confess furnished a sweet Solace to my poor heart depressed with cares & sorrows—your sympathy for my difficulties, your admonition for my Conduct, & your solicitude for my welfare, impress deeply my affections, and are received as the...
I tresspass this Note on your Time, to inform you that I have strong expectations I shall be able to prove, that Burr sunk his ordnance Boat in the Mississippi near the Bayou Pierre, That He actually seduced a Sergt. Jacob Dunbaugh to defect the Service, who accompanied Him to Natchez & will I hope be in my power in a few Days, and that He corrupted Lt. Jackson & His Garrison at the Chickasaw...
By a singular concatenation of incidents, I have ascertained that Depestre mentioned to you in a former Letter, was the accredited Agent of Burr, who visited St. Louis in October last; and that Mr. Depestre bore a Letter from Burr to a Mr. Provenchere, giving Him assurances that a revolution of the Western States would take place on the 15th. Day of November & inviting Him to join in it. This...