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    • Sullivan, James
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    • Jefferson, Thomas
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    • Jefferson Presidency

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I have, frequently been requested to introduce my friends to you, but have uniformly refused to comply. I have considered your time as the property of your country, and as being too important to be improved a moment on any thing I would propose. I cannot, however, refuse to join with many others in asking your attention to Colonel Lee of Marblehead. I formed an attachment to him on the plains...
The very great pleasure which I should enjoy, in paying my respects, in person, to Mr. Jefferson, as President of the United States, it is not probable that I shall have very soon, unless you shall give us the honor of a visit to the northward. My son John Langdon Sullivan , who is in the mercantile line, is making a tour to the seat of government; I have requested some of my friends there, to...
Some time ago the Secretary of State, Mr Madison, requested of me information in regard to the method of ascertaining the boundary between the United States, on their northern angle, and the British dominions. He was lead to this by my having been the agent of our nation in the settlement of the St. croix line. I readily complied with his wishes; and now observe in the Presidents communication...
I was exceedingly honoured by your condescention in your letter of the 21st. of may. The mail had scarcely gone from Boston with mine of the 14th. of april before I deeply regretted having troubled you with it. I then knew, on a moments reflection, that there was no vacancy, and that it would be ineligible for me to leave this State. The same friendly feelings which dictated your letter will...
I should have indulged the pleasure of replying to the letter you condescended to honour me with in June last; but I reflected that there was a vast number, who had a prior claim, and with whom a correspondence with Mr Jefferson, personally, would be more agreeable to him, and I also considered, that the accumilation of business, on the mind of the first magistrate of a nation must be so...
I inclose to you a hasty sketch of our state politics. The sufferings I have endured would not have been oppressive if my wife, and my only son in America did not feel more than I do. When I say my only son, I mean the only one now in America attached my politics. My oldest son is with the other party and is more bitter against me than any of the federalist, with a few exceptions. My situation...
By some letters from Washton lately recieved it appears that there is great interest felt in our state election, among the gentlemen near the seat of government. The republicans have made every possible fair exertion. There will be 80000 votes, 70000 are already known, in which the federal candidate has 1200 more than the republican candidate. There are some scattering votes. If there is a...
The letters I have presumed to intrude on you have been too much filled with egotism, and I rely on it that they are reduced to a state of illegebility soon after you have the trouble of them; and you may rely on it that you will have no more trouble in this way. A man of strong feelings wounded with the poisoned arrows of malice and calumny will be troublesome, but it ought to be restrained....
On what we call western circuit, and whence I returned yesterday, I have had intercourse with Lincoln, Bidwell and other friends of the national administration. We all realize the pain and anxiety incident to your exalted Station; and would by no means add to the burdens you are destined to bear, by letters, from whence you can derive no advantage. The situation of the national government in...
Leonard Jarvis Esqr. who has been in respectable public life in Massachusetts, is going to the capital on business, and has conceived that a letter from me may have a tendency to procure him the notice of the President of the United States; to whose administration he and his connexions are warmly attached. I do not feel willing to injure myself so much as to say that a recommendation from me...
The station to which I have been recently called by my fellow citizens encourages me to believe that the intrusion of a letter will not be offensive to the cheif magistrate of the nation. My general Sentiments on our public concerns will appear from the press, in the gazette of tomorrow, in form of a communication made this day, by me, as Governor, to both branches of our legislature. I...
In days of great adversity when I was surrounded inveterate enemies your notice and sentiments inspired me with firmness and gave me support. They are vanquished—They are fawning at my feet—The serpent is torpid with the cold, looking with but little hope for the return of the scorching beams of federalism. In the days of my keen anguish I intruded upon you one imprudent letter at least, will...
The mail that carries this has a letter to the war department on the public concerns of this state. I am very sensible of the impropriety of addressing letters to you: but there are things which it is necessary for you to know, that cannot be communicated through the heads of departments. As no answer is expected to this, I hope the casting your eye over it will not add too much to the burden...
I have the honor to transmit to you, a Resolution of both Houses of the Legislature of this Commonwealth, requesting me to apply to the Government of the Union in behalf of the unfortunate Claimants, under the Act of the State of Georgia of 1795 to part of their western Territory, who are Citizens of this State—I cannot but flatter myself, that in communicating this Representation to both...
I am aware that I am guilty of an impropriety in giving you the Trouble of this letter. Since the death of my friend Doctor Jarvis there have been many applications to me for letters on this score; my answer has been uniform, that I had no authority to trouble the President of the United States on this subject; but I cannot deny my name to Doctor Waterhouse on the Occasion. I know him to be...
We are, of course, in a state of doubt and uncertainty in regard to a war with Great Britain here; nor do I find that you have much more knowledge on the subject at Washington. Should such a war happen we have much to do in this state to prepare the ship for action. The decks must be cleared. There is no way to carry on a war with that vigour which is necessary to success without the decisive...
I do not know but that I have been incautious in Mentioning Dr Waterhouse to you as surgeon for the hospital here. I beleived him qualified but knew that a great number the faculty were opposed to him as they had been to Dr Jarvis, but beleived the opposition to be founded in politics. I am now apprehensive that his Skill in surgery is not such as I had supposed and conceive that any opinion I...
Colonel Hatch of this state goes on to the seat of government with a project of his own in the art of gunnery. If I had time to examine it I should not consider myself competent to offer an opinion upon it to the President of the united States; but I consider our situation, as a nation to be such, that every attempt to serve or unite the country ought to be encouraged. I therefore presume to...
I would not make the resolve of your administration more anxious and troublesome than is necessary; but you are now in a critical situation. This we know from the appearance of our public concerns; but this is all we know. Our enemies have all the advantage they can wish for, to raise the public Jealousy against the administration, because the reason of measures under which the people suffer...
My Son Colonel Sullivan is going to Baltimore, and will probably go as far as Washington. I have requested him to wait on you with my respects; You will find him intelligent and correct in his answers to any inquiries you may be pleased to make of him. he has been very attentive to public concerns since he returned last Spring from Italy. He has been gone three years to Europe I remain with...
The writer of the letter I take the liberty to enclose is one of our Senate, and is, by no means, an enemy to our present national administration; he does much business as a merchant, and is considered as being the most wealthy man in our State. From a long acquaintance with him I have the most perfect confidence in his prudence and integrity: I derive great satisfaction from a compliance with...
It is with the highest satisfaction that I perform my official duty, in tendering to you the respectful approbation of the legislature of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts upon your administration as President of the United States. To one whose veiws are evidently turned from all selfish, personal advantages, and fixed intirely on the interest of his country, the most respectable testimony of...
When the affair took place lately in regard to Waterhouse I was determined never to trouble the President again on business of that yet I was induced on the 7th to inclose Mr Grays letter beleiving there was no party or competion—I have no concern & do not wish to have any influence in that Matter as there are parties—and pledge myself never to trouble you again on the business of...
Was it at this moment, demanded of me, why I assume the freedom to trouble you with a letter, I should be unable to give an answer which would in any measure give satisfaction to my own mind: but you are not obliged to read it. I had the honour of yours of the third of march; and while I feel greived at your resolution to retire, I cannot say that I should not do the same under similar...
The day in Massachusetts, yesterday, was a day of uncommon exertions. The republicans seem to be assured of success; and their enemies despair. Before the Act of congress laying an embargo, they openly, and universally declared, that they did not mean to make any opposition in the election of Governor for the present year. The deep laid plot of Pickering’s letter, added to the embargo, gave...
The Federal party in this State, have obtained the government: their principal object, at present, appears to be the political, and even the personal destruction of John Quincy Adams—they have, yesterday come to the choice of a senator, in congress, to succeed him next year. James Lloyd had 246 votes Adams 213. It is of great consequence to the interest of Mr Adams, and to that of your...
When I received your letter of the 6th of may, in regard to granting certificates for flour &c, my state of health and other circumstances; urged me to decline a concern so laborious and responsible; but on communications with the friends of your administration I became assured, that as you was then in virginia, before any other person could receive authority from you, a scarcity would become...
It is with the greatest reluctance that I impose upon you a letter on our national concerns; I derive great relief from the consideration that the President is under no necessity, to read it, and, that merely breaking the seal and glancing on the superscription, will take but a moment’s time. You have been long in possession of my idea, that a strong party in the northern States are determined...
I have yours of the 12th and will continue to act as discreetly as I can in the business of certificates according to your request, until the 13th of next month. Flour &c, has lately risen on an idea, of the exportation from the southern and middle States being impeded; I will have them down in a day or two. There is no engine, but what is, and will be used here against your administration....