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    • Short, William
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Since my last of the 9th. of Decr. written from La Rocheguyon & sent by the French Chargé des affaires, I have remained silent; first because no good conveyance presented itself, & secondly because we have been for some time past expecting intelligence from America, which I wished to recieve before writing. Although I have as yet recieved no letter & nothing official has as yet arrived here, I...
I was absent from Paris when Mr Dawson arrived here, but I returned a few days after & had the honor of recieving through him on the 19th. ulto. your letter of March 17th.—I am much indebted to you for the details you were so good as to give me there as to the state of politics, & I can assure you from the bottom of my heart that nothing could give me more solid & real satisfaction than to see...
I have just returned from Auvergne whither I informed you in my last of the 9th. of June I was going. We passed some time there near a considerable estate of a peculiar kind belonging to my friend—It consists entirely of mountain heights on which there is not a single house or a single tree, notwithstanding these heights extend for several leagues.—they are covered with snow one half of the...
I recieved some days ago the letter which you did me the favor to write me by Chanor. Livingston . I have not written any since those you there acknowlege (except one by Mr Victor Dupont, of the 18th. of Octob.) I have been fearing for some time, as the commissions mentioned in your letter of March 17th., had not been heard of during the summer, that you might perhaps have been considering me...
I had the honor of addressing you on the 18th. ulto. & did not intend to have troubled you again—It is at the particular request of M. de Liancourt that I take up my pen at present—He has been applied to by the agricultural society of Paris to procure from America the seeds of which the extensive list is here inclosed. He says in his letter to me “ Je ne vois que M. Jefferson qui par ses...
I take up my pen not as heretofore to trouble you about myself or my affairs, but merely to inclose you for greater caution a copy of the list of seeds of which I sent you the original in my last of Jany. 23. It is at the request of M. de Liancourt who desires to obtain them for the Society of Agriculture. I mentioned to you the reasons for which he was anxious that I should obtain of you to...
Jefferson—mention that of Minor —& to let me know if he hears from Lilly —desire to convert my land into money or ground rent at Alexia .—Barton—Bartram FC ( DLC : Short Papers); partially dated; entirely in Short’s hand, consisting of an entry in his epistolary record. Recorded in SJL as received from Philadelphia on 17 Dec. Earlier in the year, TJ had engaged John minor of Fredericksburg as...
New York, 10 Mch. 1803 . Replying to TJ’s letter of 3 Mch. , he asks that TJ bring the bundle of papers relating to Short’s affairs when he returns from Monticello, as he would like to have access to the maps and mortgage papers for his property. With regard to TJ’s offer to repay the money he owes Short in two years, Short states that he was “indifferent” to that subject before he left...
New York, 2 Apr. 1803 . Replying to TJ’s letter of 23 Mch. , he advises TJ not to sell the land the president recently purchased. He prefers waiting for TJ’s payments to him, rather than causing regret. Before departing for Kentucky, Short will leave a power of attorney for his New York brokers, Lewis & Lawrence, who will receive payments and apply them on his behalf. He promises to send TJ a...
New York, 12 Apr. 1803. He reports that his letter of 2 Apr. was delayed but now encloses the account that TJ requested. He mentions some transactions carried out by John Barnes. He informs TJ that the first $500 payment can be sent to him in Philadelphia. Short refers to John Wickham’s interest in purchasing his Albemarle land, for which he seeks $10 an acre. He will be advertising the sale...
Jeffn.—ansr. his last —mention my lands—shall request Mr. G. Jeff. to advertise them—shall endeavour to return to Virgia. Springs—uncertain if I shall find him at Mont. if [so shd.] be happy to see him there once more—Taylor to recieve the 500 a month—as to the political part of his letter—always my opinion on this subject—founded on my knowlege of the Spa. Govt—happy in the result—do not give...
Jeffn.—as to Catlett—& my land to be rented &c.—& to write to me at Richd. if not too inconvenient—if not dissuaded by him shall rent—as to the report of Strobels failure FC ( DLC : Short Papers); partially dated; entirely in Short’s hand, consisting of an entry in his epistolary record. Recorded in SJL as received from “Prestwood” on 5 Nov. On his return from Kentucky, Short stopped off at...
Jeffn.—ansr. his of 6.—as to land—Catlett &c.—shall employ Price & consult with Mr G. Jeffn.—hope he will also give his directions when at Monti.—as to [Britony]—Durrets lease—Mr Barnes I shall stop at Semmes’s—letter to be still kept for me—shall leave this in a few days & only stop at [Mt. Vernon]—anxious to get into winter quarters before the cold sets in—as to the vessel going to France, I...
Jefferson.—Ansr. his of 12—change of time &c—has not changed my determination that this shd be no inconvenience to him—of course at liberty to act as he pleases on it—the only inconvenience to me not to be able to direct myself the vestment—state of France—of sea & of my affairs with G.J. may perhaps make me stay another year—pleasure of my residence in my own country shall often regret it—the...
Jeffn.—As to papers he sent me— Price is to give him directions as to Durret &c— Anthony —If he shall not receive the back rents to give Price a list—he to acot. with Mr. G. Jef.—The affair of the etiquette—the gaz. of U.S.—the no advertisements explained—inclose the paper from J V Stap—Gerry’s letter to me left at N. York—My first object was to enquire after Harvie as have no ansr. from him...
I had the pleasure of writing you from New York on the 19th. of July, which letter I observe you recieved—I have since then been so constantly under way that I have omitted until now, acknowleging the reciept of your two favors of July 22. & Sep. 20. & for which I beg you to accept my thanks—The last inclosed a plat of the land tenanted (for which I am particularly indebted as it is the only...
I have to beg pardon for having so long delayed to answer your favor of the 10th. inst. covering a draught on the bank here for 500. d.—It was received in due course & carried to your credit in the acct. subsisting between us. It is my intention if the weather & circumstances should be favorable to make a tour to the Southward this winter, & I shall certainly take Washington in my way were it...
Your letter of the 8th. inst. was recieved here on the 11th. inclosing an order on the Bank of U.S. for five hundred dollars, & which I accordingly carry to your credit. Under the desire you formerly communicated to me I am endeavouring to bring up our acct to the present time—I am a bad hand at business of this kind & it therefore costs me more trouble perhaps than it would another—When the...
Since my last of Oct. 3. from N. York, (which, I hope, was recieved) I have come to this place. I have not yet fixed my winter-quarters here, but probably shall do so, for the same reasons as heretofore, the greater convenience of accomodation. If any change of views however should have taken place since I last had the pleasure of hearing from you, & you should advise my endeavoring to place...
I have postponed from day to day answering your kind & friendly letter of the 15th. because I expected every day would fix the point of Monroes return or stay. The papers now tell us he has really taken leave—of course his return certain.—This would in some degree diminish my original sin of Virginianism—which I suppose would, if necessary, be objected, by those who are fearful or not...
I had the pleasure of acknowleging on the 25th. ulto. your favor of the 15th. Since then I have seen that Mr Bowdoin has left France. Not knowing whether the interposition of Bonaparte, mentioned by you, had produced its effect, I supposed, if it had not, that Mr. B’s departure indicated its not being counted on for the present. It appeared to me at the same time that Mr B’s return left a...
I had the pleasure of writing to you on the 25th. of Novr. —& also on the 29th. of Decr.—The object of the present is simply to enquire, so as to ascertain whether those letters were recieved—I very well conceive that your extreme & multiplied occupations, should not have left you time to answer them under the present pressure of affairs—& this is by no means to ask it, if it should be...
I have been so often disappointed that I was determined not again to announce my visit to Washington, until I should have set out—I left Philadelphia yesterday, & shall arrive on tuesday or wednesday—Since the roads have been in a travelling condition, I have been detained from day to day by various business with persons at New York & therefore out of my control—It was important to be done...
The memda. shall be attended to with care & with pleasure— The fine weather will carry me first to Congress hall & then to Rep’s— I find medicinal waters useful to me in this climate & those of Ballston peculiarly so—But if I should be able to give them up it will give me a great deal of pleasure to visit Monticello—I wish however it were in my power to impart to you a conviction, which I have...
You will find inclosed the chain & seal. Chaudron had several—fresh from Paris as he told me, & tout ce qu’il y a de plus nouveau . He and myself selected half a dozen that we thought the handsomest which I brought to Mrs. Elwyn, & out of them she chose the one sent—By means of this epuratory process I hope it will merit the approbation of the person for whom you destine it. Candor obliges me...
I ought perhaps sooner to have acknowledged the receipt of the 20: d. for the watch-chain—It gave me pleasure to find it was agreeable to your taste, & I hope therefore it was so to the person for whom you designed it.   I thank you for having sent my letter to Price—but he has given no answer or sign of life since—I hope however he will follow the instructions contained in it, & discontinue...
I write on the first moment of recieving yours of the 6th. The injunction there as to preliminary steps shall be obeyed. Mr. Lewis left this yesterday morning for Washington—of course you have the result of the Osage—I hope the decision will not be that I am to go in the vessel you allude to—It has been said that it is a small vessel—I have never seen any thing respecting it except the...
On the 8th. I answered your favor of the 6th.—Since then I have not heard from you—& this day being Sunday, no letters are to be had from the post-office, so that if there should be one there I shall not get it until to-morrow—of course too late for to-morrow’s mail, which goes off before the hour of distribution.   I have been at work with all possible activity in huddling up my affairs—not a...
I had the pleasure of writing you on the 8th. & on the 10th. in answer to yours of the 6th. I have looked with anxiety for your second letter—It has not yet arrived, although this morning’s mail must have come, it being now 3. o’clock—I have been working incessantly to arrange my affairs, and at the same time to obey your summons to Washington, if my presence should be deemed necessary—I...
Your second favor (July 13) is just recieved, & I am extremely happy to be freed by the present determination, from the apprehensions of the schooner—It is one of my real misfortunes to be so bad a mariner & to have such need of a good & easy vessel. It had a serious influence on my return to America, & kept me a long time in France beyond the time I had fixed. I observe that you would prefer...
As the time of my departure is delayed as mentioned in your favor of the 20th. I should not so immediately have troubled you again, if it were not that I wish thus early to say, before any arrangement be made as to the vessel, how sollicitous I am that it should be a commodious & safe one, & therefore as large as the nature of the case will admit of. My marine indisposition is a thing...
I wrote on the 23d.—Will now trouble you with only a few words, & these I should spare you if it were not for my anxiety as to the vessel on which I am to go. Since my last I have seen Mr Erskine on his return from Washington—In the course of conversation he mentioned in my presence, that Government had some intention he understood of sending the next time one of their armed vessels—As it is...
I take up my pen to answer your favor of the 2d.—It will be in time to go by the Tuesday’s mail from Washington. Your letter came to me from the post office—& must have gone there under cover to some one—as there was no postmark on it, nor your frank, and yet it came free—It contained Mr Madns. letter which I here return agreeably to your request. The concurrent disposition of you both in...
Since my letter of the 7th. I have had incidentally a conversation with a person acquainted with the Baltic, apparently with a view to the operations of the belligerents in that quarter. Such subjects being constant topics at table, no suspicion whatever could exist as to the real motives. He stated that at the end of October, such quantities of ice begun to float in that sea, particularly in...
Your favor of the 19th. was recieved here too late to answer it in time for yesterday’s mail from Washington—The next mail being tuesday, I write now to secure this being at Washington in time for it. I was extremely gratified by your letter, as it relieved me from the anxiety of the direct voyage, & the little vessels. It gave me great pleasure also to learn that the final arrangements would...
I wrote on the 27th. to which I beg leave to refer—I mentioned the reason of not proposing the subject in question to Richd. R.—I know no one to whom to offer it, although I am persuaded there are many very proper who would be delighted with it. I am extremely anxious that their political principles should be proper & acceptable from a variety of considerations; & this confines my choice,...
My letters to you not recieved at the date of yours of the 29th. were of the 27th & 31st. ulto.—Several parts of them are anticipated by your’s. The announce as to the Aviso was inserted in the papers four days ago by the post-office. Several applications were immediately made to the Navy agent here & to the Collector by the owners of vessels, who did not know which would be the department, as...
Your favor of the 6th. was recieved yesterday—Without advancing so far as to leave the least room of suspicion of my object I find that Mr Biddle’s plan is to pursue the commencement he has made in the practice of the law & would not quit it—Of the other two one has an office under the State that he apprehended he should lose, but now having lost that apprehension in a great measure, it is...
Since my last to you of the 18th. instant Mr Gibbon has arrived here with the despatches that were to be committed to me for France—& with a part of the papers destined for me—others have followed successively & I now hold all that were intended to be given me—The vessel was ready on the 26th. agreeably to contract & after that day demurrage begins. We should have sailed probably yesterday,...
I ask your permission to present to you a particular friend of mine, Mr Geo: Harrison of this City. He purposes making an excursion to Washington & will be accompanied by his Lady. Mr Harrison’s own respectability & situation would have insured him the opportunity of paying his respects to you in person—But it is peculiarly my desire to be the chanel of introducing to you a most estimable &...
Mr Hare who is going to Washington wishes to have the honor of being introduced to you. I am extremely happy that he furnishes me this occasion of testifying the sincere regard I have for him, as I value him highly & have long considered him among my first & most worthy friends here. He is also an officer & a distinguished member of the Philosophical Society over which you preside. It is with...
A letter which I address this day to the Sec. of State from hence will explain the present state of your aviso, & that we are now only waiting for the tide; the wind being adverse—I came here last evening having waited only for yesterday’s southern mail—Had there been no delay at all the vessel wd. have sailed from hence on Wednesday last—As it is it will sail to-day—the delay has been...
I have the pleasure of addressing you from the country seat of a friend where I have come to spend seven or eight days, in order to repose myself from the fatigues of my sea and land voyage, before entering on those of preparing for the one now commencing. I should have returned to Paris to-day but for a cold attended with a slight fever which confines me here— This will last I hope but a few...