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    • Randolph, Martha Jefferson
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    • Jefferson, Thomas
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    • Jefferson Presidency

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Documents filtered by: Author="Randolph, Martha Jefferson" AND Recipient="Jefferson, Thomas" AND Period="Jefferson Presidency"
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In an absence of 3 months I blush to think that this is the first time I have written to my Dear Father. it does not arise however as you suppose from want of materials, & still less of inclination, but from a spirit of procrastination which by inducing me to defer allways to the last moment, finally ocasions the total loss of opportunity. my affection, my thoughts are however, perpetually...
Your letters found us all together at Edgehill. Maria does not look well but considering all things she seems to be in as good health as can be expected. my own has been uncommonly so, since my return from Monticello. with your request of going over immediately it is utterly impossible to comply; Mrs Bache’s family being with us at present, and to remain, untill the Doctor’s return. Maria...
I am doomed to write you, in a hurry allways My Dearest Father. Abraham who will be the bearer of this has arrived […] I began my letter, and it will not be proper to make him wait [longer] than I can possibly help it. my children are doing generally well except Ellen and Cornelia the latter has had fevers for three days & with triffling intermissions morning and evening tho very short. we...
Mr Trist who will deliver this can also give a better account of the children than (limited as I am for time) I possibly can. however I must write a few lines to you if it is only to wonder at your long silence. each successive post has been anxiously expected and desired, only to bring along with it fresh dissapointment. my sister left us on Monday with her little boy better than could be...
I recieved with gratitude and pleasure inexpressible, my dearest Father, the elegant medal you sent me. it arrived safely with out a scratch even, and is I think a good likeness; but as I found fault with Houdon for making you too old I shall have the same quarrel with the medal also. you have many years to live before the likeness can be a perfect one. Mr R—desired me to tell you that as his...
My children have escaped the measles most wonderfully and unaccountably for so strongly were we all prepossessed with the idea of it’s being impossible that from the moment of it’s appearing upon the plantation I rather courted than avoided the infection and the children have been on a regimen for 4 or 5 weeks in the constant expectation of breaking out. Ann has been twice declared full of it...
We recieved your letter and are preparing with all speed to obey its summons, by next friday I hope we shall be able to fix a day, and probably the shortest time in which the horses can be sent after recieving our letter will determine it. tho as yet it is not entirely certain that we can get off so soon. will you be so good as to send orders to the milliner Mde Pick I believe her name is,...
It will be more convenient to us to leave this on wednesday than monday it will occasion a delay of 2 days only, as this is a flying visit only to shew that we are in earnest with regard to Washington I have determined to leave the children all but Jefferson considering the lateness of the season and the bad weather we may reasonably expect in december. The short time [we] shall have to spend...
It was so late the other day before I could write that I had only time to add a postscript to Ann’s letter to inform you of Davy Bowle’s intention of going to Washington, and the offer he made of carrying your chair if you wished it; he is still here and will be on theusday, so that your intentions with regard to it may be complied with if known, on that day. he leaves this sometime next week...
Lilly was here a fortnight ago to beg I would write to you immediately about some business of his, but a change on the post day disappointed me of sending the letters written to have gone by it. he says you desired him to part with 100 barrels of corn as more than you required, but he says he has got it on very good terms 16 or 16/6 a barrel and that there is not one bushell too much, on...
I have been again greatly indisposed My Dearest Father but am now so much better that I should have left My room to day if the weather had been good. I was for one night and a part of the next very ill, and having what I never in my life had before (an hysteric fit) thought my self dying whilst in it. Doctor Everett says it is not uncommon in the complaint I had, which was brought on by cold...
Mr Randolph’s election is almost certain the polls stand, Alb. TM.R 503 W.L. 140. Amh. TM:R. 390 WL. 474. which leaves Mr Randolph a majority of 279, so that independant of his influence in Fluvanna which is great, he is safe. we are all well, but I am moored here till thursday as he stopped a day with us on his way to Fluvanna where he now is, of course I am obliged to stay till his return....
The trunk you were so good as to forward from Washington, arrived safe by the same post which brought your letter. it contained the wedding cloaths, which rendered it of so much importance to some of the family that I shall make no apology for the trouble it put you to. the marriage will take place at Monticello early in August entirely private except the old Gentleman and Lady & Aunt Carr....
It is become so probable that I am to spend the winter with you My Dearest Father that I must impose upon your goodness the procuring of some articles not be had in Washington or with certainty even in Richmond. a fashionable wig of the colour of the hair enclosed, a set of combs for dressing the hair, a bonnet, shawl & white lace veil, for paying morning visits. Mrs Madison can chuse them as...
The hurry of preparation my Dearest Father must apologise for this note. we shall be at Centreville the last day of the month where Mr Randolph thinks the horse he can procure will easily take us, and sunday evening or monday morning we shall be with you we are all in health & spirits preparing to join you as soon as possible adieu, believe me with inexpressible tenderness yours MHi : Coolidge...
I have suffered so much from fatigue and anxiety since my return home that I have not had spirit, to write to my Dearest Father. the day Mr Randolph left me I discovered my Dear Ellen to be in a very advanced stage of a most horrible dissentery which had run on many days, unnoticed except by a little restriction in her diet, from the idea of it’s being a slight bowel complaint occasioned by...
some trifling repairs to our house which were to have been finished in three days after you left us, but which the slothfulness of the work men have spun out to 14 have kept us here till now; and as it is we are returning to rooms newly plaistered and the house not yet clear of the workmen. but so much is to be done before winter to make us comfortable that we think it best to go immediately...
I have but a moment to return you a thousand thanks for your goodness in writing so regularly to me during Mr R’s illness. I have been in a state of great anxiety upon his account. Thank heavens it is past. we are all well and after saturday shall look for you hourly god bless you My Dear Father believe me to be yours unalterably Mr Burwell arrived on thursday only and is still with us ViU .
I am very uneasy at the account you give of your own health. you would not set out of course whilst in any danger of the head ach but if otherwise indisposed from cold or the fatigues of the session it would be better to defer your journey, as the roads are in a state not to be concieved. the carts have not arrived yet; Davy broke down near orange court house and past by on horse-back to get...
I send you a shoe that fits perfectly the only objection to it is, the heel which is too high. I must beg the favor of you to add a comb for tucking up the hair, to the shoes. will this affair of the Chesapeake affect your return? we have had thro’ the medium of the newspapers, news of a later date than your letter contained which announce an actual commencement of hostilities on the side of...
I am very much obliged to you My Dear est Father for your kindness in saving me from the anxiety to which an exagerated report would have occasioned me. I am in hopes the swelling will go off with out suppuration. Mr Eppes found me with exactly such a one as you describe when he returned from Washington in the spring 1804 except that the pain had brought on an affection of the stomach and head...
The subject of your last letter has cast a gloom over my spirits that I can not shake off. the impossibility of paying serious debts by crops, and living at the same time, has been so often proved, that I am afraid you should trust to it. if by any sacrifice of the Bedford Lands you can relieve your self from the pressure of debt, I conjure you not to think of the children, your own happiness...
I must beg the favor of you My Dearest Father to forward the enclosed, it is from Jane to her Sister and there is no mode of comunication at present unless through you. I suppose you have heard of the loss of your dam. Mr Randolph begs particularly that you will transmit your orders about the repairs to him he has nothing to do having two overseers to overlook his business and will do the dam...
This will be Delivered to you My Dear Father by Beverly Randolph whom you may reccollect to have seen at your house in the Spring 1806. Mrs. Madison has been so kind as to procure for him young Nourse’s place during his absence or untill some thing better offers. enclosed is a little seal of my Mother that I Must beg the favor of you to have mended and My watch key if it is possible to make it...
Your conjectures with regard to the tea & Coffee was correct as we just began upon the last stock with out making any sensible impression upon them. I have no doubt therefore but there will be enough of both of those articles as well as of chocolate. cooking wine will be wanting & the madeira gave out before you left us there was no white wine therefore but what was in the octagon cellars. I...
My health is what it allways is in the same circumstances, so precarious that for fear of accident, I shall go to Monticello on sunday 17th. where you will find us all unless any unforseen event should happen to detain us. Mrs Trist and Miss Brown have been with us a week and will be in the neighbourhood if not at Monticello when you arrive with regard to Jefferson our objections were...
I have sent the 4 spoons & a large french Ladle there being 2 others left one french and one english belonging to the B S M spoons. Bacon will also give you a bundle for Jefferson which I must beg the favor of you to forward to him. in packing up the books which was left to himself to do, we have discovered that he has left nearly one half of the Buffon. I presume the best way will be to pack...
I gave the keys of the wine cellar in to Dinsmore’s hands who promissed to superintend the botling of the wine. if the bottles and corks hold out would you wish them to begin upon any other cask? and which should have the prefference? Your letter to Ann was forwarded by the same post. she left us the monday before only, in a state of such extreme dejection at the sepparation from her family...
The small pox has broke out in Staunton and spread a general alarm, least through the medium of the stages it should be communicated. if it is easy to obtain the vaccine we should be greatly obliged to you to send us some as our three youngest children and many of our negroes have not been innoculated at all. Looking over some of the literary magazines the other day we met with the beginning...
I enclose you another letter My Dearest Father, irksome as it is for me to add to your vexations of the kind Mr. R. thinks he can not refuse without danger of giving offense, friends who think they have a claim upon him. Mr Hackley also wrote to beg him to mention his name to you. we recieved the vaccine safe and will innoculate our children immediat ly as well as our neighbours. Jefferson was...
The name of the young gentleman for whom the application was made is Moultrie. The Christian name I do not remember but it is probably mentioned in his Father’s letter to Mr Randolph which you told me had been filed with the papers of the Office. if it is not to be found there, Mr Randolph’s thinks it probable that David R. Williams may know it. he is the eldest son of Doctor James Moultrie of...
Mr Randolph has been applied to by the people of the County generally to know if you would have any objection to their meeting you on the road and escorting you to Charlottesville. not only the militia companies but the body of the people. they wish it as the last opportunity they can have of giving you a public testimony of their respect and affection if you will write to him by the return of...
I shall go to Monticello a day or two before you arrive as it is probable by the return of the waggon you will be able to fix a day for your return. the arrangements necessary for retrenching all possible expense no one can be more thoroughly convinced of the necessity of than my self. your comfort My Dearest Father must however be the only Criterion any Incroachment upon that were it...