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    • Peale, Charles Willson
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Documents filtered by: Author="Peale, Charles Willson" AND Recipient="Jefferson, Thomas" AND Period="Jefferson Presidency"
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The terms of approbation with which you mention my Lecture and Museum , afford me much gratification; since I have scarcely a thought not devoted to the perfection of my scheme. From my knowledge of the Interest which you have always felt in whatever concerned the comfort of Man or the Benefits of Society, I am induced to think that even in the important Station to which our Nation has called...
It gives me pleasure to inform you that I am so far on my return to the Museum with the Bones which were lately dug up at Shawangunk, in the county of Ulster. with the purchase of these I have also the right from the owner of the land to take up the remainder, when I can be prepared to undertake so important a work. I have viewed the Grounds, and have laid my plan, or rather plans to overcome,...
Believing you would be pleased in knowing my success in a trip up the north river, by the purchase of the Bones in the possession of Mr. Mastens. Although an object of great importance to me, in undertaking the journey I had very faint prospects of the issue. On my return to New York elated with the hopes of seeing the Skeleton of the Mamoth put togather, I hastily wrote to inform you of my...
Your favour of the 29th. July I did not receive until I had reached the place of bones, when I should have been pleased to have answered it, had it been possible or proper to have taken my attentions from engagments so earnest & constant. The use of a powerful Pump might have saved me 50 or 60 Dollars expence, but perhaps the obligation to return one belonging to the Public in a limited time,...
The laborious, tho’ pleasing task of mounting the Mammoth Skeleton being done, gives me leisure to attend to other Interests of the Museum. The constant accumulation of articles not only of this but also of other Countries—increasing my imbarrisments to know how to dispose them for exhibition and public utility—these difficulties I expect will be greatly encreased after my Sons have visited...
The time is now fully arrived when it has become expedient to decide the fate of the Museum to which Pennsylvania has given birth. It has commanded every exertion in my power for 16 years, and meeting with public approbation has certainly arrived to considerable Maturity; but from the uncertain tenure of human life it may not long continue in the same circumstances in which it has progressed,...
Receive my assurances of obligation for the politeness and punctuality with which you have answered my question .—Altho’ I conceived it proper, without any loss of time, to make such applications as might insure the preservation and advancement of the Museum, particularly as at the present moment many of the articles are piled in confusion on each other for want of Room; Yet I have determined...
Your obliging letter wrote at the moment you were setting out for Monticello,—I sent to my Son Rembrandt at New York, and I doubt not he will profit by your hints of different times and prices, to seperate and accomodate the Variety of Company that probably will desire a sight of the Skeleton. In order to improve and fit my Son Rubens to conduct my Museum, I have permited him to accompany his...
The Bone from Mr Jno. Brown I have received to day, and great was my surprise to find it in form corrisponding to the ox, which the enclosed drawing will best explain. It is a proof that the Indian Tradition has a good foundation. It certainly must have been a Buffalo of vast size , for compairing this fragment with the same parts of a common Ox and its size may pretty nearly be computed to be...
View of the Upper Part From the Suter H the center of the Head to root of the horn I 7 Inches From the place of Insertion of the muscles of the Neck K to the fore part of the upper head broke off at L 10 Inches. The weight of this piece is 35 ℔ MS ( DLC : TJ Papers, 124:21495); in Peale’s hand.
View of the Back part that Joins the neck From A to B 2 feet 5 Inches. Circumference at C 21 Inches. { The Hollow part above F I believe is part of the Cavity to receive the muscles that lift the under Jaw. at G is the inner surface corrisponding, measurement across 9 Inches. That part which should join the hind part comprising the Ear is defficient. ditto at D 17 Inches— E hole for the spinal...
When I wrote last, the 10th. Ult., the head of a Common Ox then before me was so imperfect as to lead me into an error about the width of the horns—since I have procured a head from a Butcher, who did not brake the Scull, which cleaned and free’d from the horns, I find the measurement from pith to pith of the Horns is Inches. I also observe that the difference of form between this head and...
View of the back part of the Scull of the common Ox. MS ( DLC : TJ Papers, 124:21492); in Peale’s hand, with a line and notation indicating “passage to the Brain.”
View of Bone from Kentucky, presented the American Philosophical Society. MS ( DLC : TJ Papers, 124:21493); in Peale’s hand, with a line and notation on the lower left side of the diagram indicating “Hollow to recieve the Angle of the under Jaw,” a line and notation on the lower right indicating “Passage to the Brain,” and a label across a portion of the diagram, “broken.”
MS ( DLC : TJ Papers, 124:21494); in Peale’s hand; his label on the larger angle in the diagram is “The Angle of the head of fossil Bone from Kentucky”; his label on the smaller angle is “Angle of the profile of the Top of the head and the part joining the atlass and neck of the common Ox”; his label near the bottom of the diagram is “NB The dotted lines the curving of each profile.”
A Gentleman from Virginia lately viewing the Skeleton of the mammoth, told me that 9 miles from the sweet Springs in Green bryer County, a few months past, was found in a Salt petre cave some large Bones, which they supposed, from the hole in one of Vertebræ’s, measuring 9 Inches in circumference, was of a larger species of the Mammoth than my Skeleton, and that a bone of one of the claws...
Mr. Hunter is returned from Kentucky and tells me that the account of the upper part of the Skull of the Mammoth being found at Barry’s Salt lick in Kentucky, is altogather a fabrication, no such bone found there—A New Englander detailed to me the same account except the difference of 2 pounds of the weight, as was afterwards published in a Virginia paper. I am infinitely obliged to you for...
I have received letters from my Sons dated Octr 14th, about two weeks after they had opened their exhibition of the Skeleton of the Mammoth. They inform me, although but little company had visited the Room yet they were respectable and seemed pleased. my Sons had not then published in the news papers, and probably not known to the Public. they had only thrown out a few hand-bills Enclosed I...
The Physiognotrace invented by Mr. Hawkins is made strong, because subject to be handled by all sorts of People that visit the Museum—The enclosed drawing and explanation of it, is rough, but correct—and I hope will give you a perfect Idea of all the essential parts of it. Mr. Hawkins has also contrived another Index, which is designed to give the lines of a ¾ face; the lines of the hair,...
The enclosed essay on health is dressed to render it more worthy of your acceptance, and in this neither seeking compliments on it, or supposing it can give you any light, but knowing you will appreciate my Motive for making the Publication, that of bringing some of my acquaintance to reflection and then reformation. Should that be the case in a single instance my labour will not be thrown...
At last I have received Letters from my Sons in London—their neglect of writing, as I expected, was in part caused by an unwillingness to give me uneasiness at their want of success in their exhibition —but having lowered the price of 2/6 to one shilling for each Visitor, their income is greatly increased; nearly tribled, and some Gentleman who had visited their Room twice since the date of...
After a long silence Rembrandt again communicates to me, dated London March 28th.—1803. “ The best news I can tell you , is that we are all well from, Influenza, coughs & colds, and feel the balmy breath of Spring; Nothing but a tempory Fog obscures the morning Sun, our Parlour fire is extinguished, the buds are bursting & the fragrant Hyacinth is drest in all her gaiety: such a pleasing...
I have just received a letter from my Son Raphaelle at Norfolk, in which he says, a Doctr. Willson has promissed him “on his word of honour, that he will have conveyed to me a great many of the Bones of the Magalonic—Legs—feet—thighs—Vertebræ &c. he hopes the remainder may ere this have been dug from the Salt Petre cave, they are in colour and texture like those belonging to the A.P.S.—he...
Yesterday General Proctor called on me with the enclosed Letter to make what use I pleased with it, only reserving him a copy, which I have done. A knowledge of the upper part of the head, is indeed very desirable—The Cranium and Nasal bones particularly, as being wholly deficient in my Skeleton. I marval what are the teeth which he says weighs 19 or 20 pounds, can they be grinders—The largest...
I have just received the enclosed Pamphlet with Letters from my Sons —they closed their Exhibition of the Skeleton of the Mammoth the 18th. of June, and with every exertion have not been able to pay all their expences in London, are gone to Reading, 40 miles distant from London, The Mayor had been so obliging as give them the use of the Common Counsel Hall; prepairing to put up the Skeleton...
Such Instruments as we are daily in the habit of using should be made as perfect as possible, or as human invention can make them, not only the facility of use but also their durebility must constitute a great part of their value in the economy of time, (so precious to a thinking man) that a moderate expence of first cost, will weigh light in comparison with the estimate of a constant saving....
Yours of the 27th. Ult. and 1st. Instant I have received.—A Polygraph with the alterations you desire, and also Brunelle’s, which I have borrowed for your inspection, will both be sent by a Packet, said to sail on wednesday next. The defects of the Pens in that which Mr. Latrobe lent you, I can readily account for, therefore it is easily cured. I have much to say on this subject, and doubt not...
Yours of 9th. Instant I received to day, and by the enclosed you will see that I have shiped two Polygraphs for you: No. 2 is Brunelle’s. The Brig is now in the stream, and will sail early tomorrow. The present appearance of the weather promises her a good wind, and I hope she will arrive before your departure for Monticello. The Captain promises me, that as soon as he reaches Alexandria, he...
A french-man; an Indian trader from new Orleans, brought here in the sickly season last summer a Grisley- bear to exhibit. enclosed is one of his Bills—he expected to make a fortune by the Animal, but he was disappointed, altho’ it differed considerably from the common, yet nevertheless it was a Bear, & as such did not excite much curiosity. I bought his Bear, and intended keeping him untill...
Your drawings of a Polygraph I received in due time. It was my intention to have wrote, that you might have received the letter soon after your arrival at Monticella, as about that time I made the discovery, that the fault of incorrect writing with the Polygraphs ought not to have been attributed to the boards the paper rested on, but to the incorrectness of the drilling machine. Having made a...