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    • Madison, James
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Documents filtered by: Author="Madison, James" AND Recipient="Jefferson, Thomas" AND Period="Jefferson Presidency"
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I inclose several letters for you put into my hands by Mr. Pichon, with some communications of his own, which are proper to be forwarded along with them. I inclose also a letter from Mr Jones at Gaudaloupe, and two others declining commissions of Bankruptcy. My departure from this place, suspended for a day by preparations for the Mediterranean business stated in my last, has since been...
I reached home just before dark this evening, after the most fatiguing journey I ever encountered, having made the tour I proposed over the mountains, and met with every difficulty which bad roads & bad weather could inflict. As this must be at the Court House early in the morning, I have only time to inclose you some despatches from Mr. Livingston which I recd. the night before I left...
I red. last evening your two favors of the 9 & 13th. Before I left Washington I wrote to Simpson approving his refusal of passports in the cases required by the Emperor, and understood that the instructions from the Navy Dept. to Commodore Morris were founded on the same principle. It is to be inferred therefore that we are no longer on a footing of Amity with Morocco: and I had accordingly...
Your favor of the 16th. came duly to hand with the papers to which it referred. I now forward others recd. by the last mail. I have signified to Mr. Sumpter that his resignation was acquiesced in, and have used a language calculated to satisfy him that he retains the good opinion of the Executive. What is to be said to Mr. Livingston on his request that he may appt. a private Secretary, and...
The inclosed letters will shew the object of the Bearer Mr. Baker. From his conversation, I find that, placing Bourdeaux & Gibralter out of view, he wishes to be appd. as Consul, to Minorca, where he says a Consul will be admitted, now that it is again under the Spanish Government, and where he observes a consul may be of use to the U. States, particularly during our bicker⟨in⟩gs with the...
Yours of the 23d. has been duly recd. Mr. Brent had informed me that copies of the letters from the Mediterranean had been sent to you by Mr. Smith, and therefore I did not send the originals by express. The declaration of a rupture by the Empr. of Morocco, put me at a loss what to say to Simson on the subject of the Gun carriages, and how to decide as to the letter you left with me. As the...
Yours of the 27. came duly to hand. I had recd. the letter from W. Hampton & F. Maury. I had proposed to observe to them, that the case fell wholly within the State laws, & that it was probable the several Governors would be led to attend to it by the correspondence between the Mayor of N. Y. & the French consul & Admiral. It had occurred also that it might not be amiss for the President to...
The mail not having returned from Milton when my messenger left the Court House on monday evening, & it having been inconvenient to send thither at any time since, I can not now acknowledge any favor which may have come from you since my last. Among the letters inclosed is one from Higginson seconding the application from Philada. for your patronage to a demand on the vice Govt of the La plata...
I have duly recd. yours of the 30th. Ulto. with the several papers to which it refers. I have directed the commissions for Shore & Bloodgood to be made out, and have sent the extract from Clark’s letter as you required to Genl. Dearborn. He had however been made acquainted with it by Mr. Brent, before the letter was forwarded to me. May it not be as well to let the call for the Dockets be a...
Yours of the 6th. instant was duly brought by the last mail. I inclose under cover to Mr. Brent, the answers to the Merchts. of Boston & Philada., which if approved you will be so good as to seal & send on to him. I inclose also a letter from Mr. Brent to me, for the sake of the explanation it gives relative to the consulate at Nantz. If Mr. Grant should not go, it is to be recollected that...
Yours of the 10th. is duly recd. I answered by duplicates Mr. Sumter’s resignation as soon as it had been submitted to you. Mr. Livingston’s request that he may appt. a successor has not yet been answered. It is probable he will expect to know your determination in the first letter that may be written to him. The blanks of which Mr. Brent reminded you, came to me from you some time ago, and...
I have duly recd. yours of the 13th. I had been apprised of the application by the Mayor of N Y. for a guard. Considering as you do, that the federal Govt. have only an incidental connection with the case of the French Negroes, I have waited for more particular information concerning them, before writing to Pichon, who I learnt from Mr. Brent, and also from himself, was exerting himself to get...
The Secretary of State, to whom the Resolution of the House of Representatives of the United States of the 17th inst, was referred by the President, has the honor to inclose to him, the letters and communications annexed from the Governor of the Mississippi Territory, the Governor of Kentucky and from Wm E. Hulings formerly appointed Vice Consul of the United States at New Orleans. In addition...
The inclosed report as altered is acquiesced in by Mr. L. In two instances recurred to Congs have already interposed; one of them the Paoli at last Session. The judgmt. of the Court agst Capt. Maley was pd. by Congs. Several Dutch & British precedts. can also be cited. The 7 Art: of the British Treaty & 21 of the Span: go on the responsibility of those Govts. for irregular acts of the Officers...
The Secretary of State has the honor to report to the President of the United States, upon the note of the Minister of his Danish Majesty, Dated on the 9th. inst, as follows. That it appears that the Danish Brigantine Henrich, Capt. Peter Scheele, sailing from Hamburg, loaded with an assorted Cargo, and bound to Cape Francois, was captured on the 3d. of Octr. 1799 by a French Privateer, and on...
The answers from the Govr. & Intendant at N. Orleans to the Spanish Ministers letter were recd. by him yesterday. The Intendant himself states that he had taken his measures, merely on his own judgmnt., without orders from his Govt. and in opposition to the judgment of the Govr: but it appears that his determination had not been changed by the first interposition of Yrujo. As his second letter...
You will find in the gazette of this morning the letter from d’Yrujo, which he wished to be printed, and which will I hope do good. Pichon has also written a strong letter to the Govr. of Louisiana, summoning him on his responsibility, to see that the Cession of that province to France be not affected, nor the amicable relations of the Republic to the U. States, be endangered, by a...
In the inclosed Intelligencer you will find the letter from Pichon to the Govr. of Louisiana. Having been written without reference to its publication, it is less carefully fitted than Yrujo’s for the contemplated impression; and in connection with that presents some points for sophistical comments, which are made rather more, than less salient by the reflections of the Editor. The letter will...
A letter from Hulings of Feby. 15. says that at that date the Intendant had not revoked the interruption of the deposit; but had from regard to the wants of the Colony, opened the market to flour & other provisions brought down the Mississippi; the articles being subject to a duty of 6 perCt. if consumed there, and to the usual export duty, (I believe 12 perCt) if sent as an indulgence in...
1t. Quer. if the laws give any authority at present beyond the limits of the U. S? 2 “This Mission having reference to the Commerce”—may repell, more than the expression used, the criticism of illicit principal objects of the measure. 3 “including the fish” 4. if practicable he might note occasionally the variations of the Needle. RC ( DLC : Jefferson Papers). Undated. Docketed by Jefferson,...
Having recieved some days ago, but not in time for the last mail, the inclosed petition, I have thought it proper to forward with it a pardon, that in case it should be extended to the party, delay might be avoided. I know nothing more of the convict or of the merits of the petition than are to be gathered from the petition itself and the letter from W. Jones. It is signed, I observe by...
My arrival here was delayed till monday evening last; first by the completion of the business depending at Washington, and then by the breaking down of my carriage just after I had set out which detained me three days. I found at the post office your letter covering the pardon for miller, which was forwarded by the ensuing mail, with the intimation to Wagner which you wished. Yesterday I had...
I have duly recd yours of the 13. covering the papers from Govr. Mercer. The act of Maryland is I believe in the Office of State, having been sent thither by the Govr. after his return to Annapolis. The object of it in requiring the sanction of the President to the measures of the Ex. of the State, was I believe to prevent an interference with national measures, as well as to be a check in...
I have recd. yours of the 16th. with the accompanying papers. The communications &c. recd. since my last are enclosed. The letters from Paris are important, but I do not see in them the wish of the F. Govt. to retract the bargain with our Ministers, so much as an anxiety to secure its execution agst. the intrusions of G. B. and to feel thro’ their pulse, whether we were or were likely to be in...
Yours of the 18. with inclosures has been recd. I must write to Wagner for Livingston’s Cypher, before I can return the letter from him. I have with me Monroe’s Cypher only. The letters sent you by last mail from those Ministers probably contain the information in cyphered passages of the letter in my hands. The subject of Duane’s letter being somewhat delicate & important, under several...
I have recd. your two favors, one of the 24th. instant the other covering the letters from Mr. Gallatin, & Barnes now returned. I had thought it might be best not to answer Thornton’s letter because in some parts his manner did not deserve it, because he speaks with out the known sentiments of his Govt. and because the Minister of higher grade expected, will be likely to give a more eligible...
I have recd the letters sent me by the last mail under two covers, and return those belonging to your own files. I inclose herewith also the communications last recd from the office of State. I can not without losing the present opportunity make comments on any of them. A few only invite them. Yours with respectful attacht. Docr. Wallace in whose behalf the letters from Mr. Brent & Mr Thomson...
I recd. last night the inclosed letter from Yrujo. Mr. Wagner informs me that a copy was sent directly to you by the same mail, but as a further security for your receivg. the communication without delay, I take advantage of the present oppy. of forwarding the original. It is a curious circumstance that near three months after the sale of Louisiana, the French ambasr. should have given the...
✓ (0) for “before” is suggested “without” the former seeming to imply that after the suspension, an assignt. had been made. ✓ (1) after or for “friendly” insert “proper” omit “without difficulty or delay.” There was perhaps somewhat of both, and it may become expedient to say so to Spain. (2.) [“]The enlightened mind of the first Consul of France saw in its true point of view the importance of...
The Louisiana documents did not come from Mr. Gallatin till a day or two ago. I have this morning delivered 38 revised pages, which will go to the press, a few of which have been some time in the ty⟨pes⟩. There will be abt. ⅓ or ½ as many more. No time will be lost. The bulk of the work will apologize to the House for the delay. RC ( DLC : Jefferson Papers). Undated; date assigned here on the...