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    • Granger, Gideon
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Inclosed I have both the Honor and Pleasure to transmit the Address of a Number of Gentlemen. It originated not merely from fashion, but from those high transports of Joy produced by the preservation of Our happy Constitution, the probable restoration of social harmony, and the guaranty of personal Liberty—It speaks in plain language the just confidence and feelings of it’s Authors— It it with...
Yours of the 29th. ult. has been received. While I feel delighted with the high confidence you have been pleased to repose in me, its charms cannot lead me to forget that the interests of our Country may suffer through my defect of judgment or ignorance of characters. I can give but one assurance; my intentions will be right. The firm support of the true principles of the Constitution and...
Yours of the 3d. of this Month has been recd. with great pleasure—The answer to our address, has been presented to the Chairman , & by him been communicated to most of the principal People in this place.—It is peculiarly pleasing to the Citizens of this Town, who first aided by Some in whom they reposed confidence ventured to oppose the aristocracy of Connecticut, to be Noticed by the...
When I ventured to express an opinion respecting Offices & Officers I forebore remarking anything relative to the time & manner of removals; unwilling to appear forward and assuming. I have lately seen in the hands of Mr Lincoln a Letter on that Subject under the Signature of most of the leading Republicans here. As I have ever held an opinion different from that of my Bretheren I am...
Upon my return from Newhampshire this morning I had the pleasure of receiving yours of the 14th. Instant. With diffidence I offer to undertake the duties of Postmaster-General. my mind would be oppressed with great Solicitude and Anxiety, upon assuming to discharge any high and Important Office. even in that line of business, to a knowledge of which I have devoted a great part of my life, or...
In my Letter of Yesterday I designd to have mentiond: that Genl. Lyman had probably before this applied for the Office mentiond in your last . I saw him at New-haven—Mr Edwards & myself gave him a Letter to you stating that, any Recommendation from us, was unnecessary as you knew him & his Character & that We should feel happy in his having the Appointment. at that time I had no Idea of being...
After writing you from Hartford yesterday morning I came to this City to attend the Legislature, and last Evning was at a Meeting of a Number of Republicans, a wish was expressed by many, who knew nothing of my Situation, to have at the Seat of Goverment some Citizen with whom they had an acquaintance, so that they might regularly correspond & thereby give and receive correct Information....
Yours of 31st. Ultimo arrived last Evening In Conformity to Your Wishes within Ten days I will sett off for Washington and tarry with you untill such time as I can return without Injury to the Public on any ground—you being Judge. when that period arrives I must claim the priviledge of returning to arange my private concerns, which are very numerous and extensive. evry Exertion in my power...
G Granger presents his compliments to The Presidt. and assures him he has carefully & attentively perused the inclosed Address & Answer—The answer will undoubtedly give great Offence to the established Clergy of New England while it will delight the Dissenters as they are called. It is but a declaration of Truths which are in fact felt by a great Majority of New England, & publicly...
G Granger presents his Complim’ts. to the President and informs him that the mails are made up for Charlotteville evry Sunday at four OClock PM. and proceed immediately for Fredericksburg arrive there Tuesday Evning and at Charlotteville on Thursday at One OClock PM—under the present Arangement. RC ( DLC ); endorsed by TJ as received 2 Jan. and so recorded in SJL ; also endorsed by TJ: “mail...
G Granger presents his Compliments to the President & takes the liberty to inclose The “Genius of Liberty” it may afford some Amusement in a liesure moment. he presumes it came from the pen of the Revd. Mr. Griswold of New Milford. Connecticut—he also takes the liberty of presenting to the President the following Extract of a Letter recd. from Alexr. Wolcott Esq Collector of Customs at...
G Granger presents his Compliments to the President and informs him that Marbell Camden was the last Postmaster at Milton—his resignation was lately received. G Granger does not recollect the name of the Gentleman proposed for that office and prays the President to be kind enough to send the name by Bearer. RC ( DLC ); partially dated. MARBELL CAMDEN assumed the office of postmaster at Milton...
The Elections of New York State have gone agt. us for Congress. all is not right I will write fully frm. New York the mail is waiting Yours RC ( DLC ); endorsed by TJ as received 13 May and so recorded in SJL . I WILL WRITE FULLY : see Granger’s letter to TJ from Philadelphia on 14 May .
From Letters recd. here yesterday it appears that the elections in New York are not as bad as heretofore represented. Col. Thomas is elected not Williams —Van-ness has lost his Election— Col. Burr will be sorry for this. It is doubted whether Mr: has lost his Election. It is certain the Republican Tickets for their State Legislatures have succeeded in the Counties which compose the District...
Owing to causes which I have not time to explain The federalists will have 6 or 7 members of Congress. They ought not to have more than four— Their Legislature will be 70 or 72 Repub: agt. 30 or 28 fedl.—Their Senate 20 repub: agt. 12 fedl. of these not more than 6 are of that certain Interest which walks in darkness . All is perfectly safe in this State. The passions of minority are great....
The vote for Candidates for Congress is at the ratio of 7,000 federal to 3,800 Republican in Connecticut. There are more than Sixty Republican Members in the House of Representatives. and it is certain that the friends of the Administration increase in the state. They have a hard time—Their perseverance is Wonderful—but they are not dispirited & may well be calculated on—Honle. Perpoint...
Messrs. Bull and Dodd have notified me of their declining to accept the appointment of Commissioners. this has most certainly originated in the fixed determination of their friends in the City to persevere in their Attempts to obtain the removal of the Commissioner of Loans , and Postmaster . It exhibits a spirit in some measure assuming and really not very pleasing— I have not heared whether...
Yours of the 15th. was duly received. I have no use for Mr: Fenton’s Letter. On Thursday next, If my health permits, I shall leave this for Connecticut. For the last Ten days I have been confined with the Dysentery. It has reduced me somewhat. my return to the Seat of Government will be as early as shall appear safe. In the National Intelligencer of friday last . The dismissals in the post...
I have just received a Letter from Judge Robertson of Bennington In which he assures me that from the best observation he could make, republican principles acquire additional Strength in that State, and the elections are expected to be favorable. At the same time he re marks that the federalists are making the most Violent Exertions and that the dispute between Burr & Clinton has done us a...
Yours of the 29th. Ulto: was received by the mail yesterday. The Inclosed Letter for Mr: Gerry I have forwarded under cover to Doctor Eustis. I feel perfectly satisfied of his Integrity, and under existing circumstances I tho’t the mark of confidence might not be all together useless. I have forwarded by this mail one of Mr: Bishop’s pamphlets . In my tour from Washington to Philadelphia I...
In a packet which will go by this days mail, I have forwarded a copy of Mr. Wolcots late pamphlet and Two Letters which were forwarded to me evidently with a view of Submitting the same to your perusal, which I think it my duty to do without remark. I understand we have completely triumphed in Rhode Island . The news from Vermt. continues favorable—The Slanders which are in circulation agt....
Our Elections are passed and altho the Tories will have a handsome majority yet their Infamous falshoods notwithstanding we have certainly gained upon them. I have a return from Thirty Nine Towns who return 73 members—we have Thirty nine members—They 34—last may—They had 46—we 27. I have This moment examined an additional list. There are many new names—but I can perceive, among those I know an...
I am so far on my Journey to Washington after an absence of ten days from my family—In the Course of next week I shall reach the Seat of Govermt. my tardy progress arises from a severe cough & pain in my breast occasioned by a cold some weeks past. The Legislature of this State is exactly ballanced —They cannot agree on a Governor & will not unless the Tories yield. The Republicans have the...
The extraordinary productions in the enclosed paper under the signatures of “A Western American” & “Americus” appear to be calculated to produce so much mischief, that I thought it my duty to transmit it for your perusal. I am at present confined by an inflamation upon the kidnies; and am Sir most respectfully Your Friend And Humble Servant— RC ( DLC ); in an unidentified hand, signed by...
I arrived here yesterday noon having taken time to ascertain the State of Things in the Several States. you are so near Maryland that any remarks are unnecessary. In Delaware the unhappy divisions among our friends will give additional Strength to Our Enemies and we may set down that Tory State lost . The fretful turbulent Disposition which has manifested itself in Pha. originated in some...
I have the pleasure to acknowledge the receipt of yours of the 8th. and in return to communicate Intelligence no less pleasing. yesterday our Legislature assembled at the City of Hartford . The Votes for Govr . were—for Trumbull something over 14,300. for Kirby 7,848. last year Trumbull had over eleven Thousand and Kirby 4,523. The Increase of votes in our favor Since the last Struggle is...
I take the liberty to inclose a petition addressed to my care and also a Letter I have recd. from Saml Ward Esq. I have no acquaint[ance] with mr. Ward and therefore can say nothing on that Subject. The Petition is Subscribed by some very respectable People. This day the Legislature of Massachusetts assemble from what I have heard. I believe When the House is formed The Tories will have but...
The Inclosed is from Eliot who ran down Morris —he is a worthy man. Yours of the 20th. is recd. I am on the wing for Boston— Yours Sincerely RC ( DLC ); at foot of text: “The President.” Recorded in SJL as received 4 June. Enclosure: James Elliot to Granger, Brattleboro, 24 May 1803, noting two vacancies for bankruptcy commissioner in his district of Vermont, one due to his resignation, the...
Upon looking over some private letters which were carefully laid aside when I went to Connecticut in the Spring I found the enclosed which ought to have been returned to you immediately. On Thursday I expect to depart for New-England—With great Esteem and Respect Yours sincerely RC ( DLC ); at foot of text: “President of the United States Monticello Va.”; endorsed by TJ as received 3 Aug. and...
I can now speak with confidence on the subject of a Collector at New Haven. I am fully convinced that evry republican in the State who is not himself a Candidate ardently wishes that Abm. Bishop may be appointed—Indeed I should not have beleived that any man for any Office could have united so generally the wishes and feelings of the People— There are a number who would be fond of the Office....
G Granger presents his Compliments to the President—he returns Mr. Eppes letter — Joseph Jones Esq is P.M. at Petersburg.— He is fearfull that the line of Intelligence from Fort Adams to New Orleans will stop on the first of next month and as he has no Authority to act on the Subject he has suggested it that the President (if he sees proper) may direct Govr Claiborne to continue the line...
G Granger presents his Complimts to the President & returns the Letter from Mr. Ellery to Mr. Madison. he has permitted the Senators from R.I . to read the same. They appear to think the old Gentleman has coloured well. G Granger incloses a Letter he recd. from New York last mail from a very respectable Merchant in that City. Isaac Kibbe Esq. who is spoken of in the Letter was some 12 or 14...
I take the liberty to inclose a Letter which I have recd from Mr: Bates: [also] One from a Mr: Morgan addressed to you through my care, the object of which I know not: also one from Mr: Bishop. I have conversed fully with Mr: Bishop in relation to the Suspicion of his being the Author of Aristides, and for myself am fully persuaded that the suspicion is unfounded and that he was not, directly...
I had the honor to receive yours of the 7th. Ulto. inclosing Mr. Stewards Letter to the Secretary of State. I feel myself unable to go into a detailed Statemt of the business as I cannot resort to the files and documents of the Genl. Post Office. I have therefore directed the Assistants Postmaster Genl. to State the business at large so that you, Sir, will be enabled to judge whether my...
I receivd. the inclosed by the last mail. The writer is Atto. for Mr Claiborne’s Government and one of the Officers of the City of New Orleans. I have deemed it my duty to transmit it for your perusal. It is with real and high regret that I inform you the federalists have (in all probability) succeeded in New Hampshire in the Congress election. For my part I am also inclined to believe they...
I have visited Our friends at Providence and had a full conversation with the Govr. Messrs. Russell, Wheaton & Others on the subject of the Office at Providence. The Governor was impatient for an appointment, all the other Gentlemen were solicitous that the business might be postponed for the present. There are some very serious difficulties among Our friends in that State and there is some...
G Granger presents his complimts to the Presidt: & with pleasure assures him of the election of Nicholas Gilman to the Senate in the room of Judge Olcat. He incloses a Letter from Mr Gurley for perusal. The Electors in Connecticut have voted for Pinkney & King. DLC : Papers of Thomas Jefferson.
G Granger presents his respectful Compliments to the President & submits to his perusal a vindication of the rights of Innocent Purchasers under the Georgia Grants of 1795 Having submitted to the public this view founded on the Constitution and Laws of the Nation he is determined to wait in Silence, the issue of this business. Whatever his opinions and feelings may be he shall studiously avoid...
Nothing short of the most urgent necessity could have induced me to add one mite to the Thousand cares and difficulties, with which you are constantly surrounded. With Others, I have Kindred & Relatives, many of whom are respectable; and never to this moment have I solicited for either of them, or for myself, either public favor or office. The time has been when I thought no circumstance could...
I have the honor to inclose a report in relation to the most convenient and direct roads to New-Orleans, St. Louis and Detroit. I Am Sir with great Esteem & Respect your humble Servt DLC : Papers of Thomas Jefferson. The Postmaster General having considered the several following enquiries, what is the most expeditious route to New Orleans?— to Saint Louis?—to Detroit? for mails which shall...
Inclosed I transmit a Letter from Rufus Easton Esq with various other documents which relate to Louisinia. They were by him intrusted to my discretion and I presume you will not deem the perusal an Useless labor. I Am, Sir, your most Affectionate friend DLC : Papers of Thomas Jefferson.
 I have now the honor to enclose a continuam of Mr Eastons communication, and the pleasure to inform you that the New Orleans mail, via Fort Stoddart, will, at furthest, be in opperation by the 15th of May next.  I pray you to accept my congratulations on the brilliant sweep of our friends in New Hampshire and on our certain prospects in Massachusetts— With great esteem and respect Yours...
Yours of the 14th. inclosing Mr. Redick’s letter; & the Maysville petition was duly received. Of Mr. Redick I know nothing. In the course of a few days, and as soon as a due attention to the more pressing business of the office will admit, I shall take the liberty to transmit to you, a detailed view of the case, for your opinion.   I have closed contracts for the establishment of a line of...
I take the liberty to enclose a letter of June 17th. from Gov. Claiborne, on the subject of a new post-road, also a plan or chart of said road, a letter to yourself from Gov. Claiborne and another in a very tattered condition from Gov: Williams, & I pray you Sir, when it suits your convenience to return the letter & chart to me. Not one word has yet been heard from Abrahams.   I am sir with...
I have lately received a letter from Mr Abrahams, dated, “Fort Stoddert, June 25th”, in which he states, that he has been confined at New Orleans, by a fit of sickness, and that he has just arrived at Fort Stoddert: he also remarks, that while he was sick, all the horses that were placed on the route for the purpose of transporting the mail, had either died, or been stolen by the Indians—that...
G Granger presents his compliments to the President and takes the liberty of inclosing a Letter from Jonathan Hastings Esquire. DLC : Papers of Thomas Jefferson.
G Granger presents his Complimts to the President and incloses a Letter from Perpt. Edwards by which it appears he wishes to be district judge in Connecticut. DLC : Papers of Thomas Jefferson.
G Granger presents his compliments to the President and returns the letters transmitted to him—he has given the allowance he lately made to Mr Estes a retrospective effect to the date of the contract—which virtually raises his salary to about 700 Dollars ⅌ Annum DLC : Papers of Thomas Jefferson.
I do hereby certify that no evil or inconvenience has arisen to the public from the employment of persons of colour to drive the mail stages on the post road from New York to Philadelphia by Col. Ward, so far as has come to my knowledge. DLC : Papers of Thomas Jefferson.
I now do myself the honor to address you on the subject of the contemplated improvements on the post roads between Nashville & Natchez, and between the Rivers Ohio & Mississippi. Notwithstanding the pressure of my Contractors, I have devoted considerable attention to the subject. There has been already a road explored and laid out from Nashville to Grindstoneford. This service was performed by...