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    • Cabell, William H.
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    • Jefferson, Thomas
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    • Jefferson Presidency

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Documents filtered by: Author="Cabell, William H." AND Recipient="Jefferson, Thomas" AND Period="Jefferson Presidency"
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Yours of the 19th. was received by yesterdays mail—On the order for discharging that portion of the Militia that had been sent to Norfolk from this place and Petersburg, some farther explanation is necessary than what I had time to give when I wrote to you before on that subject. That information should be asked from you, and that a decision should be made before time has been given to impart...
Your favor of the 24th. was duly received, and I immediately gave to General Mathews the necessary instructions for permitting the return of the Captives. I have not yet heard of the manner in which he has executed them. I had not supposed that the Proclamation, altho it authorized and required the use of force, had carried us quite so far into a state of even qualified war, as to justify the...
Yours of the 31st. of July has been duly received, and I shall by this days mail give the instructions which you require, so as to ensure the most direct information as to the movements of the British Squadron—The papers from Norfolk represent them as being quiet at present, but I have not received any letters from General Mathews for several days—I have not heard from him since he received my...
I enclose for your perusal the only letters I have received from Norfolk since those forwarded to you by Mr. Coles—My letter by him was written in very great haste, and amidst much interruption, and since reflecting more maturely on the subject, I find that Mr. Tazewell has not, in his construction of my letters on the subject of intercourse, differed so widely from what was intended, as I at...
your letter of the 7th was received yesterday morning. My last, by the way of Fredericksburg, will have corrected a mistake into which I had fallen in my letter by Mr. Coles, on the subject of Mr. Tazewell’s report—That mistake, however, was productive of no inconvenience, as it was discovered before I wrote to General Mathews; to whom, no instructions have been given variant from those I have...
I am this moment favored with yours of the 9th, but I fear the direct mail to Charlottesville is already closed—No inconvenience will arise from the circumstance mentioned in your letter because as I understood that Capt. Decatur was not in Norfolk. I did not state to General Mathews that he no longer had the power to receive and regulate the intercourse by flag with the British Squadron—Your...
I send you the letter which I received this morning from Norfolk—I regret that the Norfolk mail does not arrive in time for me to send you the letters the same morning by the Fredericksburg Mail—I have written to General Mathews for copies of the papers referred to in Capt: Taylors report, which shall be forwarded to you without delay—I have not seen, nor have I been informed of the nature of...
I am sorry it is not in my power to give you any information from Norfolk, as I received no letters by this mornings mail. I am with the highest respect Sir yr. Ob. St DLC : Papers of Thomas Jefferson.
There was no mail this morning beyond Petersburg. I have therefore again to regret that I can give you no information from Norfolk. Should I receive any letters of importance tomorrow morning, I will send them by express to overtake the Fredericksburg mail, which generally leaves this place before the arrival of the Norfolk mail— I am with the highest respect Sir yr. Ob. St. DLC : Papers of...
I have the honor to enclose you General Mathew’s letters of the 12th & 13th of this month, which were both received at a very late hour yesterday morning. Not knowing whether you take the Norfolk Ledger, I take the liberty to send you a paragraph from that paper, which gives information very interesting if true— I am with the highest respect Sir yr. Ob. St DLC : Papers of Thomas Jefferson.