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    • Austin, David
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I used to address you on the subject of the European War, & of the probability of the reacting fire , & of the returning blaze .— It may be that this anticipated view may be drawing nigh. Should there be any place near your dwelling that might afford me employment & support, I should be happy to lend my aid in the discharge of such duties as might be assigned me. I am at present at, & near...
The experience I have had of your candor, induces me to address you once more, on the State of the Nations, & on the state of our own Nation, in particular. The peace of European Nations is not yet attained: nor can it be attained unless the means appointed to produce it, be carried to them or they come to us.— I have a mind to clothe the pacific operations of your administration, with a glade...
Your very civil method of receiving former communications induces me to address the President once more: not so much in view of a commission to go abrod, as in view of liberty to serve the public at home.— But before I open exactly my object, I beg leave to interpret to the President my former views by present events.—I foresaw that another convulsion was to arise in Europe unless the tempest...
At the period of my departure from Washington, in the zeal of circumstances I dropped to the President, a letter containing a statement, wh if memory serves, needs to be corrected. The expressions convey an idea, that there is something ecclesiastical, attatched to the Chair of the United States. The President will scarcly believe this to be an accurate statement; and in his own declaration,...
On my returning to New England it would add greatly to the Obligations I am already under to the President, if he would favor me with a small token of his attention so far as relates to an appointment to the Office of Collector for the Port of New London in the State of Connecticutt. The place is but a very short distance from the residence of my father in Law & of Mrs Austin who is at...
Having attended the hand of national fulness as long as finances would serve, & having pressed for attention by means which decency or delicacy would scarcely warrant, I find myself set down in this City.—My thoughts are for Phila. or farther eastward: still as I am likely to pass a few days with the good people of this place I am induced once more to signify to the President that it is with...
The smallest attention to the principles of decorum would have forbid any farther instrusion upon your moments after the very polite note with which you was pleased to honor me; was I not still pursuaded of being capable of rendering essential services to the United States, abroad. From London, the cords of the National dulcimer might be so toutched as to vibrate in favor of our interests in...
You was obligingly disposed to say, that tho’ you did not subscribe, you would receive a copy of the publica. in hand.—The Boy waits on the President with two copies—The price is fifty Cents each. If the President accepts the two, it will be the more obliging; as I have little other means of living but from the avails of the truth I publish to the world. If the President could accommodate me...
It is painful to me to pierce a man of your natural good dispositions, even with the truth. But who can, with good conscience refrain, when the language of providence is so plain?— In the matter of a successor to my Hond. father , you refused my counsel: & it called forth more smoke, than you have been able, to this day, to dispel. The more you strove against the fire that arose, the more it...
The Senate have, this day, so far amended the report of the Committee on the Library Bill, as to place the sole power of appointment, in the President. This was the more agreeable to my wishes, as it will enable the President to exercise that good will towards me, in this matter, of which I have never entertained a doubt, provided a situation had offered, in the judgment of the President,...
A Bill is about to be offered to the House of Representatives by the Senate, in which it is proposed that the nomination of the person to take charge of the books of the Congressional Library, shall be made by the President to the Senate, as is usual in other official appointments. I have several particular friends and acquaintances in the Senate: and should my name be so fortunate as to meet...
Being in this place to supply the place of Docr. Muir , gone on the affairs of the Church to Baltimore; I take the liberty of addressing a line from this place. To a mind filled with all the sensibilities, incident to a tolerable acquaintance with men & things, you must be sensible that to be obliged to write to you the things that I have written, must be matter of trial. The President,...
Will you have the goodness to look over a communication of 28th ulto & seriously to weigh its contents.— Stretch the line of my general intimations upon the opening face of things, on Capitol Hill: & believe me Sir, that what you may now, dimly, discern is but the rising breath of a mighty storm. Your Excell’y will ee’r all is over, be as anxious to find water with which to quench this...
Having been educated to the science of Morals; & having been ever satisfied with those exercises which fall to the lott of a public teacher; it would never have been my wish, from private motives, to have turned my thoughts towards any other subject: But as providence would have it; my eyes have been directed towards the movings of the invisible finger of God, in the affairs of the late...
Will you forgive a second address on the subject of the place left by Mr Meredith? — The considerations, by which this application is supported, are 1.  The openings of providence in favor of the General Objects of my many addresses— 2.  No Injury will be done to any man should the President comply with this request.— 3.  No man can bring more intrinsic worth into the Councils of the Presidt....
Hearing that the Treaty with France, was not, at the sailing of the Maryland ratified, I beg liberty to lay before the President a few things in respect to this instrument, & to the appending circumstances of our relations with France. Please to understand that the total operation of what is stiled Revolution is, in the design of the Great Supreme, deadly & destructive . It is as a pioniering...
Fully pursuaded of your natural benevolence, & having no cause to doubt of your readiness to put forth your hand to any enterprize that promises well to the interest of the nation, & of mankind; & knowing that evidence of the truth of the things I have offered to you, & may offer, arrises from an accurate regard to the tendency of the measures suggested , & also to the counter effect of...
—Some of the young Gentlemen, at table, this day, observed, that of a late appropriation by Congress, for the use of the Clerkship, the Secretary of the Treasury was about to retain 5 per Ct. in view of compensation to additional aid required in his own office: I have thought that to employ my leisure hours, it would be very agreeable to receive an appointment to any duties wh. might fall...
In the George Town “Museum” & in the “National Intelligencer” of this day may be observed a notice of public attention to the 4th. of July, to be paid at the Capitol. The President will observe a consistancy of object in this design. It means to plant the doctrine of a new Œra, under the President’s, adminestration; considering the matter, however, totally in an abstract point of view: so that...
I dropped into the hand of Gen: Dearborn, this morning, a brief note designed for the eye of the President. It is calculated, as a plaister to heal the wound, opened at N. Haven, on the subject of the Collector’s Commission. The note will present its own details. The principle of it, in Executive application, is found in the policy of dropping a stone on the surface of neither of the...
Mr. Austin acknowleges the very acceptable Note from the President of 21. inst: and has the happiness to find that the matter meets the entire approbation of every body. Upon the corner stone of this Example, the Citizens will cheerfully build to the furtherance of their own highest interests, and for the general prosperity of the administration and of the City. The doors of the Capitol are...
Mr: Austin presumes to ask, if it would meet with the countenance of the President, that a discourse should be delivered in the Capitol , to any disposed to attend, on the approaching fourth of July?—Mr: A. is accustomed to public exercises on this National day; & if the matter should meet the approbation of the President, he would be happy to occupy an apartment in the Capitol, on that day:...
Lest the President should judge that a proceeding in the pacific design, solely, on his own judgment might leave him destitute of counsel in moments when it might be needful, it may be understood, that the undersigned is about to settle in this district: he is to preach at George Town, for Mr. Balch , next Lord’s day, and the succeeding sabbath at the Presbyterian Meeting House, in the City:...
Mr. Austin begs liberty to lay before the President the enclosed instrument; trusting that viewed with a candid eye; it may serve to aid the President’s conceptions of the just & rational method of introducing that pacific estate, for which the Nations wait, & for the dawnings of which the Zion of God, daily sends up her prayers. There are many, who have hoped for the opening prospect, in the...
That the President may not be at the trouble of demanding farther explanations, the following considerations are submitted, in aid to the general pacific design. 1. That the event contemplated is looked for, to arrise from some quarter, by all the world, needs no confirmation. The Earth and the Heavens are moved to discover from what quarter, this beneficence to the sons of men shall come. 2....
I have observed too much candor in your manner of receiving my communications, to fear a trespass in the present attempt. I will bring my views nearer to a point. The total circles of national operation are under certain commanding powers: Ballanced by views & objects merely human, these powers are guided by means, originating in the chambers of human enterprise, passion & power. The whole...
Mr. Austin takes the liberty of submitting to the President, the consideration of a momentary interview. It may be had in the closet, or in the presence of any persons the President may think proper to admit. Mr. A. will submit to any interrogations the President may think proper to propose, in view of illucidating, more fully, the subject of former communications. The time & place are...
The letter of Mr: Humphries enclosing other communications from Mr. OBrien & Mr: Cathcart , Agents of the United States among the Barbarians, falling under my eye this morning, as copied from the “Supplement to the National Intelligencer,” printed at the Seat of Government; induces me to quicken the operations of my pen. I suppose these communications will warm yr: blood agt. these unprovoked...
Knowing that the matter of my Communications may labor in the minds of the well-disposed, and even of the candid; seeing the evidence of the things stated, visibly, are only to be gathered from a comprehensive view of the order of providence, set down first , in the written testimony, & secondly , commented upon in a manner, not discerned by every one; I take the liberty of observing, that the...
Suffer the interesting nature of my communications to apologize for their frequency. Perceiving that the Office of Secre’y of Trea’y is filled, & that of course, there remains no place in the Gift of the President that would invite my attention at the seat of government, I take the liberty of suggesting afresh, that the event of the Presidents comeing to the administration opens a New Æra in...