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    • Short, William
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    • Jefferson, Thomas
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Documents filtered by: Author="Short, William" AND Recipient="Jefferson, Thomas" AND Period="post-Madison Presidency"
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The last letter which I have had the pleasure of writing to you, was of the date of Octob: 9. in acknowlegement of your kind favor of the 8 th of Sept r . You are well assured that my long silence has not proceeded from indifference to the gratification of hearing from you, but from an unwillingness to add to your burthen, already too great, of correspondence with your friends. In the mean...
Your letter of the 3 d inst. was received here the day before yesterday. It was not until today that I was able to find Mr Boyé—Here is what I learned from him. Being desirous to return the instruments to you in person he deposited them in a place of perfect safety when he left Richmond for the North, to await his return—He feels great regret at having thus detained them from you after they...
I had the pleasure of writing to you at some length on the 25 th ul to & I would not give you this trouble now if I were certain that letter had reached your hands. But I have some apprehension that my servant may have been negligent in carrying that letter to the post-office, as I have lately heard that you were at Monticello & not at Bedford, as I had at first supposed, on not hearing from...
I did not intend to have troubled you again so soon when last I had the pleasure of writing to you on the 17 th of April in acknowlegement of your kind favor of the 10 th of that month—I send this letter at a venture & merely to take the chance of finding you before you set out on your journey south—Here is the cause of it. I learned last evening from a son of Judge Peters, that his father has...
I have the pleasure of informing you of my arrival here, & thus having now approached so near to Monticello as to shew my fixed determination of attaining the point I have so long been aiming at, that it might suggest reasonable doubts of my determination. I here encounter a circumstance which will cause a few days delay however. Last year when Gen l Cocke was in Phila da , I was induced to...
At On the 6 th inst: I wrote to you at M al Grouchy s request, to state his intention of being at Monticello about the 20 th — Since then I have seen M r Harris who informed me your intention was to go to
Very soon after the departure of my last letter, I learned through the newspapers, the accident which had befallen you. I felt much anxiety on account of it notwithstanding these papers gave a favorable account of the turn which the disorder had taken. I wished much for more detail & for a more recent account, & was prevented from troubling you with a letter to that end, only from my...
I send you the three letters inclosed merely because they are the complement of those I sent in my letter of the 18 th inst. They are much too prolix to insist on your reading them—Burn them therefore by way of despatching if it should best suit you. The idea of sending them to you occurred to me merely because they offered some views on what has now become a mere historical subject; which...
It has given me infinite pleasure to hear from you by the letter which you were so good as to send by M r Randolph, dated March 24. He gave it to me a few days ago only, on his return from Boston; having passed through this City without stopping on his way thither. I was indeed very anxious to hear of you & of your health, though unwilling to trouble you with a letter & impose on you the tax...
Your kind, friendly & most instructive favor of Oct: 31. has been constantly under my eyes, & often read over, although I have until now postponed acknowleging & thanking you for it. I cannot tell you how much you have delighted me by making me so much better acquainted than I was, with the great & virtuous Philosopher of whom I have long considered myself, though unworthy, a disciple. Like...
I have not hastened to reply to your letter of June 19. because I saw that your departure for Bedford would prevent your recieving it until your return; & the present will reach Monticello at your debotter . I am sorry that M r H. should think any thing further, to be necessary for his safety; not, assuredly, that I am not willing to give him every satisfaction his caution can devise, but...
I return you a thousand thanks for your kind & friendly letter of the 24 th ult o . The details as to the state, of your health, I had been long wishing for—They are now doubly gratifying to me, as they inform me that you have so perfectly recovered from the only inroad I had ever known on your constitution. And this attack I percieve was brought on by an inattention to the second maxim— il...
I cannot too much thank you for your kind letter of the 14 th It gave me great relief from the anxiety I was under on account of reports as to your health & the affairs of the University—To the last, as mere reports, I should have paid no attention, after those which prevailed on the same subject, & without even the shadow of a foundation, some time ago. But the Richmond Enquirer which I see...
I had the pleasure of thanking you in part in my letter of May 2. for your most invaluable favor contained in yours of April. I say in part; for it would take more than one letter to contain the whole of my gratitude for this most acceptable mark of your friendship. I have read it over & over again; always with delight & instruction, & a renewed sense of my obligation to your amiable...
I had this pleasure on the 2 d ul to & trust that letter got safe to hand. I inclosed in it a song composed & sung at a public dinner by a man of your own age, & who to me has always professed the longest & most invariable friendship for you. I sent at the same time the discourse of a Russian on public education. I thought it might perchance amuse you to see the ideas in those climates on this...
It is always a great gratification to me to recieve one of your letters. That of Aug: 9. I found here on my return from my summer’s excursion—It gratified me first by informing me that your long confinement had not affected your general health, of which I was very apprehensive, & secondly by the account you give me of the state of the University—That account came here most opportunely—for a...
Knowing your present aversion to writing, & knowing also how much you are accablé by inevitable correspondence, I have abstained for some time from adding to this load. If I break in upon you at this moment it is because I am in search of information that I know not where to look for otherwise, & indeed which I can have no certainty of finding from you—If you recollect, among the articles...
I had last the pleasure of writing to you on the 14 th of August, from Ballston Spa, my usual summer residence. The cause of my troubling you at present, you will find inclosed—a letter from our old & worthy friend de la Motte, which he sent to me with a request that I would forward it to you. I had remained several years without hearing from him; & I learn now with real pain, that the cause...
In the long course of our acquaintance, & of my friendship & veneration for you, I do not recollect ever to have recieved a letter from you which has so much excited my sensibility, & at the same time given me so much pleasure as yours of the 10 th inst. —It is such a mark of your friendly recollection under such painful circumstances, & at the same time relieves me from so much sollicitude on...
I had the very sincere pleasure of recieving some days ago your kind favor of the 13 th ul to covering the syllabus. It has been a source to me of much gratification & instruction also. the subject has been always one on which I have postponed to aim at information, because I felt in limine the conviction that it was impossible to attain such a degree of certainly as would be satisfactory to...
I had this pleasure on the 3 d ult o I do not write this in order to add to the burthen of correspondence with which I know you are already overloaded, but merely to ask you to send me one line by the ministry of one of the young Ladies, that I may know how your health is, what news you have from M r Gilmer, & whether M de d’Epinay arrived safe. I sent her in three divisions by three different...
Your most agreeable favor of the 10 th was recieved here two days ago. You say nothing of your health & therefore I have the gratification of believing it good—I met at the Society last evening your old friend M r Patterson of the Mint, & several other of your friends, all of whom partook with me in this pleasure, more especially Mr Patterson who is about your age, & who never fails when we...
The date of this letter will shew that I have been detained here much longer than I had expected—Whilst the extent of this delay remained undefined I was unwilling to give you the trouble of a letter, & therefore have abstained even from acknowleging & thanking you for yours of the 17 th of May— I now think I may fix with sufficient certainty the time of my departure, to venture to mention...
Contrary to all precedent I have by me a letter from you which has remained for two months unanswered. I have been silent only because I feared to give you trouble. I know how laborious it is for you now to write—& I have always known how unwilling you were to employ an amanuesis. Yet I am not the less anxious to hear that you are perfectly restored to the use of your arm, & have retained your...
I am thus far on my way to the land which I mentioned to you in a former letter; & having stopped here at an early hour to repose myself I make use of a part of the after noon to have the pleasure of writing to you. Hitherto I have travelled on what are called good roads, & yet I find myself much more fatigued than I had expected to be. It is true that the carriage which I hired at Utica, in...
It has been a long time since I have had this pleasure. It was on the 5 th of Dec r in acknowlejement of your kind & friendly favor of the 24 th Nov r I here agreeably to your request give you some account of your old friend Charles Thompson. I have accidentally within a few days spoken with a gentleman who went to pass a day with him, & I availed myself of this to make further enquiry for...
The vol s of Hall arrived safe. I am much pleased that they gave the pleasure which I hoped, to the several readers at Monticello, & only regret that you did not keep this little work. I have learned since my return here that he is the son of the Sir James Hall who was in Paris with a son of Lord Lettish, Lord D. They were both the friends of Dugald Stewart & both inclined to republicanism—If...
I never felt myself under the same degree of restraint in taking up my pen to write to you—for there seems a propriety in abstaining from bringing into view a subject which is painful, & at the same time I cannot be ignorant of what is a subject of public discussion. I have followed the debates of the assembly with impatience & anxiety, as I had seen a letter from a gentleman in Virginia, whom...
I have deprived myself for a very long time of the pleasure of writing to you, as I know how much you are taxed by correspondence & how burthensome that tax is to you. This abstinence on my part has been a real sacrifice, & more especially since we have heard through the newspapers, of the fire of Monticello. None of your friends here with whom I have spoken, know any thing more of it than...
If I could be induced by any means to attaching any value to any prophecy of mine, it would be the having led you to give me your foresight into futurity. Although I am willing to to take it with the prudent proviso which you annex to it, yet I value it most highly, as I have ever done what I have received from your for now near half a century. The ultramad ministers of France seem disposed to...