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Documents filtered by: Author="Lafayette, Marie-Joseph-Paul-Yves-Roch-Gilbert du Motier, marquis de" AND Recipient="Jefferson, Thomas"
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I Am the More flatterd By the Command Which His Excellency General Washington Has Been Pleased to Intrust to Me , As Independant of the General Good that May Be Hoped from this Expedition, It seems to Promise An Opportunity to Gratify the High Sense I Have of My Personal obligations to the State of Virginia. I Shall from time to time Inform Your Excellency of the Movements of the Continental...
sdkfj The Arrival of a french Squadron in the Bay will Have for some days Raised Your Excellencys Expectations, and You Have, I Hope, Received a Letter from me wherein I informed Your Excellency that I was Coming to Virginia with A Continental detachment, and that the Commander in Chief Had been pleased to Give me the Command of an Expedition Against Portsmouth. Since that time our troops Have...
On my arrival at this place I did myself the honor of writing to your Excellency and I hope my letter has been safely transmitted. A number of vessels have come up the river and as our preparations are going on with the greatest alacrity, I think the troops may be embarked to-morrow, so that if we hear from the French squadron we shall immediatley sail for Portsmouth. Had vessels been in...
Your Excellency’s favors of the 10h, 12h, and 14h insnt. Having Come Yesterday to Hand, I Beg Leave Most Respectfully to offer My thanks for that part of their Contents which is Personal. The Exertions of An Unbounded zeal, and A Conduct wholly Actuated By Affection and Respect, will, I Hope, justify in some Measure that Opinion which Your Excellency and the other Citizens of this State Have...
From a Conversation with the Quarter Master of this State, I find that there will Be A Great deficiency of Horses, and that None of those which Have Been Procured Can Serve for the purposes of our Artillery. Under these Circumstances, and in the full Conviction that a transportation of Heavy Artillery and Stores Was Necessary to the Expedition, I thought that Oxen Might in Some Cases Render...
On My Arrival at Suffolk, I found that Gnl. Muhlenberg Had Marched down to this place, and was in Hopes to Be Enabled to Reconnoitre the Ennemy’s works, which I think to Be a Necessary Measure Before Any plan Can Be settled for a Cooperation. But to My Great disappointement there was No Ammunition in Camp, and (tho it Has Been sent for seven days ago) I Have not Yet Been able to Learn when we...
In the Midst of preparations and Sanguine Hopes, intelligence was Brought to our Camp Near Sleepy Hole that the Squadron Some time Mistaken for a French fleet, was Behond any doubt Composed of British Men of War. Their Force and Number was still Uncertain, Nor was it possible to know where they Came from. It was then A general opinion that they Had troops on Board. The Same Night the troops...
Since the Return of the British fleet in the Bay, With A Number of Vessels supposed to Be transports from Newyork, I Have Entirely lost Every Hope of An immediate Operation Against Portsmouth. How Much the disappointement is felt By me, Your Excellency Will Better judge than I Can Express. This However May Be A satisfaction that On our part, We Have Been perfectly Ready And that With A Naval...
Before this Comes to Hand Your Excellency Will Have Got an Accurate Account of the Action Between the two fleets, where it Appears that Notwistanding their Inferiority Our Allies obtained the Honor of the day. But the Object of the Expedition was Lost, and the Attak of Portsmouth Unfortunately Post poned. On the Point of Setting out for the Grand Army, I will at least do My Best for the Relief...
I Have the Honor to inform Your Excellency that the detachement Under My orders is on its Way to Richmond Where I Expect to Receive directions from General Greene. From the intelligences I get of the Number General Philips’s Army Consist of, I Aprehend that the State of Virginia Must Need An immediate support. This Consideration alone Could induce Me to Advance By Rapid and forced Marches with...
My Last Letter to Your Excellency Having Acquainted You of Our Preparations to Return to the Southward, and Having Also Mentionned the Reasons which in the present danger Urge me to Hasten By forced Marches to the Support of Virginia, I will only Add that We Came in two days from our Encampement Near Baltimore to this place and intend Setting out to Morrow for frederik Burg. Our Baggage,...
Your Excellency’s Letter of Yesterday Has found me At this place where we Arrived this After Noon After A March of twenty five Miles which the Extreme Heat of the day And Absolute want of Waggons for the transportation of the Men Have Rendered Very fatiguing. Want of Waggons Has Also detained our Ammunition which Cannot Be Here Untill to Morrow. As soon As we get this Necessary Article the...
Captain North from Baron de Stüben’s Camp Has Been with Me last Evening and was directed By the Baron to Give me Every intelligence Relative to the Situation. From what He says I think the Baron is By this time [at] Chesterfield Court House, And Consider Richmond as the Present object for Both Parties. Every Boat that is in the River should Be Collected Above the falls By which Means A...
The returns of the Men serving from the different Counties I have not yett been able to obtain, as soon as they are made out, I shall have the honor of inclosing them. By Genl. Lawson’s letter herewith sent your Excellency will learn the small progress He has made; request to have the letter returned. Baron de Steuben informs me that only two men had been imployed in repairing the damaged...
The Enemy’s intention has been to distroy this army and I conjecture would have been afterwards to distroy the Stores which it covers. They have now undertaken another movement and it appears they are going through the country to Fredericksburg. Their Dragoons were this morning near Hannover Court House and (unless this is a feint) I expect the Army will be there this evening. Our small corps...
The Enemy’s Movements into the Country, and our great deficiency in Cavalry, makes it absolutely necessary that two hundred dismounted Dragoons, under the Command of Col: White are immediately furnished with Horses. For this purpose I have directed Col: White to fix upon some Place of safety to equip his Men, and send them to the Feild; to accomplish which I must request the favor of your...
I have receiv’d your Excellencys letter enclosing some Resolves respecting the imports of Horses, and thought it was my best way to intrust General Nelson with the care of carrying them into execution. Inclosed your Excellency will find the Returns of General Mullenbergs Brigade. I have the pleasure to inform you that Camden is evacuated, that the posts of fort Motte, Orangeburg, Fort Watson,...
I have the honor to forward a dispatch recommended by the president of Congress, to be sent to you by a particular conveyance. Lieut. Stokely is charged with it, and directed to deliver it into your own hands. Lord Cornwallis was at Birds yesterday, from which place he retired with his main body, into Williamsburg. We have been pressing his rear, with our light parties, supported by the army,...
I Have Been Honoured with your favor of the 14th and while I am to thank you for the pains You took of Acquainting me with particulars Relative to Col. Ross, I feel a sincere pleasure in this opportunity to Continue our Correspondance. The Honor of Hearing from you Shall Ever Be wellcome, and I Beg leave from time to time to present You with the Camp Gazette, and with the assurance of My...
When I Heard of Your Going to France, I heartly lamented I Could not Have the Honour to Receive You there. But in the Same time Anticipated the pleasure to wait upon You this Winter in our French Capital. Your Voyage to Europe I Ever Considered as a favourite Wish of mine and on Every public and private Account am Happy to think You at last Have Consented to go. Permit me, my dear Sir farther...
Le Mis. De la Fayette a l’honneur de faire ses compliments à Monsieur Jefferson et lui envoye la lettre de Mr. Le Cte. De Florida Blanca. Il verra que dans ce tems l’article des Limites avoit été différemment reglé que les prétensions Espagnoles ne semblent l’annoncer. L’original de cette lettre fut envoye dans le tems au Congres. Une Copie remise à Mr. Jay mais il n’y eut rien de plus de fait...
This letter will be delivered By a private Courier of Mis. de Noailles who Has Been in My family, and who, I am sure, will take proper Care of my Dispatches. Since I Had the pleasure to see you, I have Been at the prussian Court, and the prussian Camps with which I was much pleased. And Now am at Vienna, with an intention soon to Return to Potsdam where there will Be great deal of Maneuvring....
Otchikeita is Gone to the abbé, and Kayenlaha will wait for You to Morrow. It is probable Mr. du Crest will be there, Ambassador from the Court of the Palais Royal. Duke d’Harcourt writes me that Eleven Suits him Better than ten. Adieu. Here is an Application from Horace’s to our Good General Here are three Verses made By M. de Marmontel RC ( DLC ); unsigned; without indication of addressee or...
Inclosed, my dear Sir, I send you a letter to Gnl. Knox wherein I mention Count d’estaing’s Anecdote as He gave it to me. Your idea Respecting Paul Jones is Very Good, and if He is prevailed upon to go, altho’ you deni you think yourself Warranted in Advancing public Monney to Him, He will easily find it Among His friends. And I think the sooner He goes, the better. Wishing you a good journey...
Inclosed I send you several letters which Have been intrusted to me, and Now are forwarded by a safe Hand. You will also find one I had writen to you at the time of your departure which Arrived too late. The Epistle to Joseph Brant is writen by My Young indian whom I Requested to ask Brant what are His Views and His Hopes from the Court of Great Britain. I am every Minute waiting for a Copy of...
This letter, My dear Sir, Will Be delivered By M. de la Tagnerette a Gentleman Well Acquainted with financeering Matters who is one of the farmers of the Postoffice. He has some ideas Regarding our tobaccoes which I Advised Him to Communicate You. Bonjour My dear friend. LAF. RC ( MHi ); without indication of addressee or date. This letter could have been written at any time between 1785 and...
I Have spoken with Baron de Grimm who, it Seems, Has No Notion to Continue the Monthly 25 guineas, and says He Has taken no other Engagement But to advance that sum once—for you must know, Between You and me that the 25 guineas exceeding this Sum Have Been delivered under his Name on my Account, which of course the Empress will Reimburse if She Accepts of the proposal. In the mean while Baron...
I Have been Honoured with your welcome favour of the 24th just as I Had set down at Luneville with an Intention to write to you, and give you an account of my Round about journey, which shall be at an End By the 20th of the Next Month. In an official, and a private letter June the 16th, General Knox acknoledged the Receipt of our letters inclosing a Note from Count d’Estaing and Says He Has...
Inclosed, my dear sir, I Send You the arrêts du Conseil about Wines. While you are printing Mr. de Calonne’s letter, Could you not Have it on two Columns, the one in English. It will be better translated By Mr. Short than By our News paper printers, and prove Convenient to such of our friends who Cannot well Read french. Let me have twenty Copies. Our last Evening’s Conversation, together with...
It would Be almost as easy to shoot one of the flying Geniuses of the Arabian Nights as to direct a letter to the place where it Has the Best chance to Hit You. I Have Been dilatory in My Answer, which must be imputed to the public Hurry of National Affairs. But as I Now Hope for Your Speedy Return, I shall Make this letter the Shorter Because I Have thousand things to tell you. Our Assembly...
Notwithstanding the Advantage of Your Situation in the busy Center of public Affairs, I know that our Country News will not be Quite Uninteresting to You, particularly when they Are Mixed with the Personal News of a family Most sincerely Attached to You. Our Preliminary Assembly is at an End, the journal of which I Have directed to be sent to You. We Had No details to Enter into, but it Has...
Thus far I Have Come down from My Mountains, and Hope I will not Be sent Back without some decision or other Respecting American affairs. Inclosed is the Copy of a letter to M. Lambert which I Have writen as soon as I Knew His Appointement. I also inform M. de la Boulaïe that I will Be Ready to Meet Him Every day in the Next week, But that I am obliged to set out Again on the fifth of October...
[ Nemours [5?] Nov. 1787. Recorded in SJL as dated “tuesday (Nov. 5)” and received on 9 Nov. 1787; however, Tuesday fell on 6 Nov. in 1787, so TJ was in error either in the day of the week or the date. Not found.]
Inclosed, My dear friend, I send You the Proposed Constitution which I Have Received on My Way. What do You think of the powers of the president? I am affraid that our friends are gone a little too far on the other side. But suppose it is the Case, and General Washington is the president, I know him too well not to think He will find the danger, and lessen the authority Before He Goes over....
I thank You, My dear sir, on the Good News You Give me from S. Carolina . I Hope Virginia will not fail. Every thing Goes on well But the Point Relative to the Presidency which You and I Have at Heart. I Confess this Makes me Uneasy. Will the General Agree with You. The Moment He Adopts our Opinion, My fear is Gone. Our Internal trouble did take a decided turn. The late Arrêt du Conseil Missed...
I Most Heartily thank You, My dear friend, for Your Excellent ideas. What will Become of the States Generals God knows. Our House Has this Morning protested Against the Appellation of Commons , and the Commons Have said there Must Be No intermediaire Between them and the King. It is true they Meant the Ministers But we took it for us. In the Mean While the King and Queen are on the...
This Morning Has Been Employed in Hearing the Report of a Committee for Subsistance and As they were Going to Vote thanks to Administration Mr. de Mirabeau Rose and said He Could Give proofs to the House that You Had Made offers to obtain flour from America which Have Been Refused—He Announced His Motion On that Head for to Morrow, and Means to Ground on this an Attack Against Administration....
Before Your letter Came to Hand M. de Mirabeau Had engaged to disown what He Had Advanced. On the Receipt of Yours He did more, He Undertook to Read it to the Assembly, and telling Every thing that was in it He layd it on the table. Some Body Undertook to translate it, and the House Called for the Reading of the translation. I Confess I thought it indelicate, if Not for Mirabeau’s feelings at...
M. de Mirabeau’s Affair brought me Under difficulties and Almost a Quarell with the Ministry. He Had Engaged to Retract Before Your letter Came to Hand. He did it, and Besides read your letter, and laid it on the table. Some Body Undertook to translate it, which He did Very ill, and Many in the House asked for the Reading of this translation. But as M. de MiRabeau Had said Every word which...
I Beg for liberty’s sake You will Breack Every Engagement to Give us a dinner to Morrow Wenesday. We shall Be some Members of the National Assembly—eight of us whom I want to Coalize as Being the only Means to prevent a total dissolution and a civil war. The dificulty Between them is the King’s veto. Some want it Absolute, others will Have no Veto, and the only way to Unite them is to find...
Altho Every Motive of Regard and Affection Conspire to Make me Lament our separation, I Lament it still more on Account of our Revolution wherein Your Advices would Have Greatly Helped us, and Could Not fail to Have Had a Great Weight Among our Constitution Makers. You left us on the Point of that dissolution of the Patriotic Party which I then did, and I Have ever in Vain Endeavoured to Unite...
The detachment under My orders is to embark this Morning, and if the Bay is Clear of Privateers will proceed as far as Annapolis where I expect to Hear from our Allies. My former letters Having exposed our Wants to Your Excellency, I Shall Content Myself with adding that a Number of large vessels, and a quantity of provisions will be very necessary for transporting and Subsisting the troops in...
Paris, 1 Feb. 1790. He asks TJ to be of service to M. Minguée, who is leaving for America to “faire un établissement” on the Scioto river, having served with patriotism and zeal in the national Parisian army from the beginning of the Revolution, and from whose great friend, the “Gouverneur de mon fils,” he has just received new testimony in his favor. [P.S.] “I don’t know, My dear friend, When...
Amidst the dificulties Which Now Attend An American Correspondance, it is Necessary for friends Not to find fault With Each other, and in Spite of Naval Piracies and Various Accidents, (One of Your letters Was Near Six Years old,) Mutually to depend on Sentiments as UnAlterable as they are Ancient—I am Nevertheless in Hopes that Notwithstanding mr Pitt’s Contrivance to declare a Whole...
As I’ll Have By this Opportunity the pleasure to Write to You, I shall Now only Mention the Affair of M. de BeauMarchais Which You Better know than I do—His Claims Have Been InHerited By a former Aid de Camp of Mine Who Married Beau-Marchais’s daughter and Whose Sister is a Wife to General Dumas the Chief of the Staff in the Middle Army—My Attachement to My two Companions Makes it a duty for...
I Have Not, this Long While, Had the Satisfaction of a Line from You—it Was on My Emerging from Captivity that I Received Your Last Letter , dated Six Years Before, when You Heard of My Leaving the Mountains of Auvergne for the Command of an Army—You were foretelling the Successes which the European Revolution, the Institution of The National Guards, and My personal Situation Seemed to Have...
I Had Been a Long While Without Hearing from You When Your Welcome Hand Appeared Again in the Letter of Which Mr. dawson Was the Bearer—I Hastened to Paris that I Might Receive Intelligences of our Beloved American Country and Her Worthy president. They Have proved Much to My Satisfaction—the More So as Besides the patriotic Affection Which Binds me to the United States I think the Exemple of...
I Have not this Long While Had the pleasure of a Letter from You —Yet I Hope You Have Received the Heartfelt Expressions of my old, Constant friendship, and the Affectionate, patriotic Wishes Which Accompagny You in a Station Where the Welfare of the United States, and the Cause of liberty are So Highly Interested—So Confused Have Been the Ideas of Europe that Never She Could be So Much...
[. . .] [. . .]ngston Has [. . .] My frien[. . .] [. . .] you and the philosophical Society With two Copies of a Work [Which], [not]wistanding the Actual turn of the public Spirit, Has Attracted Much Notice in France, and Will I am Sure Appear to You a Very Distinguished performance—An other Friend of Mine, Cen Tracy , My Colleague in the Constituent Assembly, My Son’s Father in Law, Now a...
On My Coming for a few Days to Paris I find two Opportunities to write to You and Am Happy to Repeat the Expression of My old Constant Affectionate Regard—Mr Levingston’s Official Correspondance and that of Mr King, Now in this place Will Let You know All the politics of Europe—The Interior politics of France I Have No pleasure to Expatiate Upon, Nor Can You fail Anticipating My Sentiments on...