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    • Kirby, Ephraim
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    • Jefferson, Thomas

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Documents filtered by: Author="Kirby, Ephraim" AND Recipient="Jefferson, Thomas"
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I take the liberty to convey to you the enclosed Pamphlet .—It contains sentiments which I believe will meet your approbation. The author lives in my vicinity, and is an exception from the general character of the Connecticut Clergy.—In the great conflict of political opinion, he has suffered much for righteousness sake. Permit me Sir, to mention, that if either the office of Post Master...
I take the liberty to offer for your perusal and amusement the enclosed effusion of anti-republican malice . It is a true specimen of the present temper of the party in Connecticut.—The mass of the People begin to discern the danger which they have escaped, & to resort to the republican standard; but the work of reformation will be slow.—The priesthood are armed against us with all the powers...
It is with great diffidence that we make the communication, which forms the contents of this letter.—The subject has for a long time seriously engaged our attention, and that of our confidential republican friends—It is indeed of a very delicate nature.—Our troubles have been imbittered by the recollection that our own former measures have led us into the present dilemma.—A conviction, that we...
I should not presume to trouble you with concerns subordinate to the duties of your important station, was not the subject of my communication really interesting to the people in this vicinity. The Post Offices in this part of the United States have for years past been almost universally in the hands of violent political partizans—many of them insensible to the suggestions of honor, &...
Being recently elected a member of the Legislature of Connecticut, and feeling unwilling to disappoint the wishes and expectations of my constituents, I have to solicit a discharge from the office of Supervisor of the Revenue . The business of this office is so far advanced toward a conclusion, that I apprehend the public can experience no essential inconvenience from my discharge at the...
Several of my respectable fellow citizens, understanding there is still a vacancy in the Commission of Bankruptcy in this State, have solicited me to address you on this subject, and to name Majr. William Judd , as a candidate for the appointment. Majr. Judd’s location is convenient and accomodating to the public service. He resides in Farmington, which is much the largest commercial town,...
Accept my grateful acknowledgement of the letter which you did me the honor to write on the 10th. ulto.—The appointment of Mr Judd under the Bankrupt Law will not be condemned as injudicious or unfit, even by those who are in the constant habit of condemning every act of the present administration. His age, experience, and respectable rank in society placed him on uncontested ground. The...
It has been mentioned to me, that expectations of the removal of the Surveyor at Saybrook in this State, from office, are generally entertained. Should such an event take place, permit me to name Mr. George Wolcott as a candidate for the appointment. He is a Gentleman of fair and unblemished moral character, whose integrity, amidst the conflicts of party, I believe, has never been questioned;...
Having been absent from home about two weeks, the letter which you did me the honor to write on the 15th. ulto., and the blank Commission which followed by the next Mail did not reach me until this day. The Secretary of State has conveyed the Commission which was filled for myself.— The confidence which you have been pleased to repose in me, meets my grateful acknowledgement, and so far as a...
A few days since I had the pleasure of an interview with Mr Granger—He being acquainted with the fact of the Blank Comn. of Register being confided to me, we conversed on that subject. It appears that two young Gentn. of about twenty five or thirty years, both Lawyers, the one from the State of New York, and the other from the State of Connt. are desirous to establish themselves in that part...
I avail myself of the first moment to announce my arrival, with my associate (Mr Nicholas) at this place. It is not from any defect in reasonable calculation, or want of proper exertion, that has prevented our being at the place assigned for the discharge of our official duty on the first of the present month. I commenced my journey in the month of Septemr and have been twelve weeks pursuing...
Being necessarily detained in this place a few days to prepare for the remaining part of my journey, I have availed myself of the opportunity which it presented to designate some suitable character for the office of Register in The County of Washington.—I have heard but of one person who would do justice to the appointment. Among all the respectable characters, with whom I have conversed,...
After an uncommonly fatigueing and hazardous journey, of four months, I reached this place in company with my associate, Mr. Nicholas, on the 26th. day of last month. At every step, impediments unforeseen were presented, and our passage protracted to a length beyond every calculation. I commenced my journey in September. It was then supposed that I had taken ample time to accomplish it by the...
I had the honor of addressing to you several letters which I fear have miscarried, as I have received no communications from the seat of government since my arrival in this territory. The Board of Commissioners at its first formation adopted a system of rules for the government of its proceedings, which were published to the people.—This led to regularity in the preparation and presentment of...
I presume I need offer no apology, for taking the liberty to communicate to the chief executive magistrate of the United States, such circumstances respecting this remote and secluded district, as are supposed not to be fully known at the seat of government. The people inhabiting this section of the Mississippi Territory, are peculiarly cut off, from all communication with other parts of the...
In your letter of the 15th. of July last, you was pleased to say, that “the number, nature, and extent of our settlements east of Pearl River was yet but imperfectly known,” and to request that during my continuance in this part of the country, I would endeavour to obtain full and faithful answers to certain queries, which were at the same time proposed. My attention has been turned to this...
A few days since, I was honored with your letter of April 10th. from Monticello, together with the Commission therein mentioned. No exertions shall be wanting to render myself useful to the public, and to justify the confidence reposed in me. The Board of Commissioners have for sometime past delayed to close the business before it, from an apprehension that the law had undergone material...