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    • Eppes, John Wayles
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Your letter of aug. the 6 th arrived here when my house was filled with my own and M rs Eppes ’s connections— M r Burton and his family left us on Saturday— my sister and M r Lane on Tuesday—I could not conveniently leave them here and the season is now so far advanced that you will I presume soon return to Monticello — We are begining to experience the inconveniences of the wet and cold & our...
Your friendly letter of the 4th instant I received yesterday—I should earlier have written to you had I followed only the impulse of my feelings. It was not however my wish to add to your other cares anxiety for my poor little Orphans. Francis was extremely ill two days after my arrrival here, and his situation was the more distressing because I had not the sympathy or aid of any friends, the...
I enclose to you a letter from Colo: Bently of Virginia —You will find among your papers another letter from him previous to your leaving the city of Washington last spring—You mentioned I think when I presented the former letter to you, “that the papers by which the release must be drawn were at Monticello —that you would execute it and forward it to Colo: Bently ” — His post office is...
I am sorrey to be obliged to claim payment of the small bala n ce due me for interest—you will obluge me by forwarding an order on your agent at Richmond believe me when I assre you that nothing, but an extraordyary pressure at the present moment would induce me to make application our best wshes attend all the familuuy ViU : Edgehill-Randolph Papers.
I met with Doct r Flood at Buckingham court house on the second monday of the present month. From him I had the pleasure of hearing you were in good health and that a letter from you to me had been put into the mail at his Fathers on that morning—The letter has not been received and I am unable to account for its failure—Even if it had gone on to Richmond it ought to have reached me on Tuesday...
I received in due time the letter forwarded from Floods — I regret that my letter contained any thing which could induce you to suppose me either unreasonable in my proposals or diffident of your attatchment to my child —Being incapable of expressing either directly or indirectly any sentiment calculated to wound your feelings I have no hesitation in solemnly disclaiming any expression not in...
We left Mont-Blanco on the 23d. of last month and expected by this time to have been safely landed at Monticello—We have been detained here however in consequence of the situation of my Father who has been so much injured in one of his legs by a kick from a horse as to be unable to move from home at a time when a heavy and serious business hangs over him—I went to Richmond for him a few days...
From the want of time your last letter received a few days before I left Richmond was not acknowledged. Maria arrived here just one week before the Legislature finally adjourned . She was in good health herself but was very near loosing our little Francis on the road between Edge hill and this place. From cold or cholick or some other cause he became lifeless in an instant in the carriage and...
I enclose under cover to you a note for my little boy —I am delighted to hear that he gives you so little trouble—If you can prevail on him to write to me often so that I may know he is well I will not impose on you the sacrifice of time which appears to be so completely filled up with occupations, so much more interesting than the sedentary life to which you have been for so many years,...
I found on my return to Eppington on the 17th. of august your letter of the 4th. of June—It arrived after my setting out for the Springs and was not forwarded—The boxes have arrived at this place I hope in safety & I shall attend to your directions in moving them— I have agreed with Mr. Richard Thweall (the brother of the gentleman who married my sister for a horse for you—If you can trust...
Since my visit to Monticello I have written to you frequently and although I do not know it I presume of course some of my letters have been received. My anxiety about Francis induces me again to write to you—He is now advancing to an age when the only controul which either of us can exercise over him must depend on his own feelings. From every thing I hear I conclude with certainty that the...
Your letter of the 29 th of July was received by the last mail—I am highly gratified at the prospect held out in it of our seeing you here—I shall feel great pleasure in accomodating you with a loan of 4000 dollars in the mode you propose—In the present uncertain condition of Bank stock it will be better for me to dispose of the stock and loan you the money—I would not wish a cent more or less...
I have just time while enclosing a Letter from Maria to acknowledge the reciept of your letter of the 13. of June. Maria has been very unwell & is now at Eppington for change of air. As she is equally interested in the contents of your letter I shall postpone my answer until we have an opportunity of perusing it together. In the mean time I can only return my thanks for the offer you are kind...
The unpromising appearance of the weather prevented my leaving home until the third instant—I have this day lodged with M r Peyton five hundred dollars for you—I have also sold my United States stock at 103—If therefore you will take my house on your way to Bedford I shall be ready to conclude our contract and give you a check for the balance of the 4000 dollars— I shall be at home on Tuesday...
I regret that I was not at home when your servant returned with Francis — It was so late when my servant returned from North Carolina with the grape slips that I thought it best to set them out at once and put the part designed for you into a very rich bed in my garden— Martha sent part of them to you—The others still remain and shall be particularly attended to—By sending down at the proper...
I left Maria yesterday. She is now in a fair way for regaining her health. She rides every day on horse back & has recovered her strength entirely. But for the dread of the measles I would carry her immediately to the Green-Springs as the cold bath would probably benefit a pain in her back from which she has frequently experienced inconvenience from the time of her miscarriage at Eppington—And...
Un certain where a letter might find you I have delayed until the present time returning an answer to yours of the 16. of September by Francis. I have directed him on his return to Columbia to pursue the course marked out for him by you and to become an irregular instead of a regular student at the University— Your opinion as to the value of a Deploma corresponds with my own—My only reason for...
Your letter of the 12th. of May arrived here while Maria and myself were on a visit to my Sister Walker the first we have been able to make since her marriage—We were detained there 13. days by rain— As it will not be long before we shall meet—Lego & the arrangement proposed by you shall be the subject of conversation—The idea of occasioning personal inconvenience to you would induce me to...
I postponed writing by the last post from a hope that a cough with which our little infant had been attacked a few days before might prove only a common cold—There is no longer room for indulging so pleasing an idea as it most certainly is the hooping-cough—The violent symptoms which in general attend the commencement of the disease such as fever & difficulty of breathing have disappeared for...
Francis has been detained in consequence of the severe indisposition of two of my children—They are now however nearly restored to health. I received by the last Mail a letter from M r Baker at Richmond now in which he States that M r Wood had Just opened a School in that place and was very anxious to have Francis as one of his pupils— He has declined returning to Lynchburg .
The various rumours which have reached us as to the state of your health have been such as to excite serious apprehension and alarm on the part of your friends—All the recent accounts concur in representing you as entirely well or so far recovered as no longer to cause anxiety on the part of your friends—accept my congratulations on an event which I am certain no human being can hale with more...
Your letter of the 3d. reached us last Evening—The one enclosing a letter to Mr. Anderson was not received until after my leaving Richmond. I have not as yet been able to fix on a Horse that will perfectly answer as a Match for Castor—There is one in Petersburg whose form figure and colour would do well but I fear he wants height. I will take an opportunity of comparing him with my horse which...
We have been favoured within a few days past with a visit from Patsy and Mr. Randolph which has revived a little the drooping spirits of my poor Mary. The sores on her breasts have proved most obstinate & successive and continual risings appear almost daily to check the hopes I form of seeing her once more free from pain—Two new places of which we had no apprehension have pointed (since my...
I have postponed writing until I could give you some information as to the horses—I have engaged Doctr. Walkers horse certainly—Mr. Bell has undertaken to send for the match & if I like him I shall have him also—So that you may count certainly on Bells horse and most probably a complete match—I examined Doctr. Shores pair also and drove them some miles. They are fine blood bays upwards of 16....
Tracy ’s Political Economy & your Report on the University (which you were so good as to forward) have been received. As tokens of your continued friendly remembrance I look on them with great pleasure. The treatise of Tracy I had previously purchased & read & the Report on the subject of the Unive r sity had been forwarded by a friend from Richmond . This continued devotion of your time and...
circumstances on which I shall not dwell have prevented my writing to you for some time—I have not however thought less of you and of others dear to my heart by whom you are surrounded. I have sold out my interest in the Eppington plantation & am now occupied in fixing a permanent residence here—It is a situation superior in climate soil & prospect to the other and of various houses which I am...
I have been looking with great anxiety for some time for a letter from you—My own situation has been such that I have not had a moment to devote to any purpose— You left me almost on the bed of sickness— So soon as I was able to perform the journey I went with M rs Eppes to Carolina and my Journey was so long delayed that I did not return to Eppington until the 20 th of November — On the 21 st my
your letter from Poplar Forrest arrived here while I was absent on a trip to Eppington and Richmond . Any arrangement which you consider calculated to benefit Francis in the course of his education cannot fail to meet my approbation. I have only one fear that Francis amidst the amusements of Monticello will not have resolution enough to pursue steadily the course marked out for him— I had...
I forwarded to you a few days since a letter from Maria —My Father who is now in Town left her well yesterday. You will find enclosed the journal of the house of Delegates containing the amendments proposed to the Constitution of the U States—They are postponed by the Senate until the next session— Early in the present session of assembly a Resolution was submitted to the House of Delegates...
Your letter arrived here while I was absent on a short visit to my sister Lane the management of whose affairs have devolved on me—Firmly persuaded as I am that such a view of the eight years of your administration as would be presented by yourself would be the best antidote to the political poison circulating among us, I should consider myself as violating the duty I owe to my country could I...
We reached Eppington safely on the third day from Monticello and this place two days afterwards. Our journey was extremely tiresome from the heat of the weather and slowness of our horses—The day after leaving Monticello we were twelve hours on the road and eleven of them actually travelling 36 miles—Maria bore the journey well and continues in good health. I finished halling in my Wheat on...
The badness of the roads prevented our reaching Millers last Evening. We arrived here at an early hour after being overset once without receiving the smallest injury. The Carriage went down so gradually that the glass windows which were up received no injury. Marias foot improves with traveling. She walked last evening conveniently without her stick. She is well this morning in good spirits...
Your letter of the 24 th of June has been received and read with great pleasure—If the war continues and with it the present rate of expenditure nothing but a rigid adherence to principles such as you state can secure us against the evils of a permanent debt— The duration of the Taxes reported to the present Session of Congress has been limited to the war and one year after its conclusion in...
I have attended to day the trial of a warrant against Callender & Pace under the act of assembly authorising the justices of the peace to demand “security for the good behaviour of those who are not of good fame”—Various English precedents as to the extent & meaning of the words “ not of good fame ” were cited and it has been decided by the Magistrates who set in the trial that the common...
Our little one continues in good health and I feel no apprehensions about Maria. The hardness in her breasts has gone off entirely and as the milk flows freely there can be no danger of return. We have considerable apprehensions about the whooping cough which rages in every part of this neighbourhood. At Charlottesville & Milton we know that they certainly have it, & I have just learnt that...
On Tuesday last I met Mr. Crump. His horse was the last chance for matching Castor—I found him different in Colour, about two inches lower & his price for him 300 dollars which I thought greatly above his value. I do not think there is the smallest chance for a tolerable match for him in this part of the State—I know certainly that neither Petersburg or Richmond or the adjoining country can...
Our trip has been delayed so far beyond my expectations that I am induced again to write fearing you may feel some uneasiness.—We have at length fixed on Friday next for setting out, but as my mother has determined to call on Mr. Baker who has been very much injured by a fall from his chair & is still confined, it will probably be Tuesday before we reach Monticello— My children continue in...
My poor Mary is still confined—She is well enough to pass to an adjoining room but has not yet ventured down stairs. The sores on her breast have proved most obstinate & will not I fear be easily healed without the aid of the knife to which she feels as is natural a great repugnance— I left her for one day on business to Richmond and learnt from George Jefferson his having forwarded a letter...
I am happy to inform you that my little ones are in fine health again. Francis has recovered entirely from the complaint in his bowels and the little girl is the picture of health— I should have had the pleasure of meeting you at Monticello but Betsys youngest child has been and still continues so ill that it would be cruel to seperate her from it—She is every thing to Francis and he has...
My being uncertain whether you had returned from Bedford prevented my writing before I left washington — The rancour of party was revived with all its bitterness during the last Session of Congress —United by no fixed principles or objects & destitute of every thing like American feeling, so detestable a minority never existed in any country—Their whole political creed is contained in a single...
I have directed Martin to remain at Monticello until he learns to Turn—He will be able to get the stocks necessary for the pieces 400 in number and I can send for them after his return— My health is I hope gradually improving— I am able now to take exercise on horse back which I am in hopes in time with a rigid attention to diet will restore me— Martha unites with me in every wish of affection...
To avoid the difficulties, which must ever attend personal applications, on subjects important and delicate, I have adopted the present mode of addressing you. A stranger to forms, and following the impulse of my feelings, I have ventured to indulge, and express, sentiments, for a part of your family, which ought perhaps, to have received your previous sanction. Could I hope, that should time...
My poor Mary still continues to suffer much from her right breast—It has broke in four or five different places & is still much inflamed. Her fever had left her entirely until yesterday: it returned then in consequence of new rising & inflamation—We expect Doctr. Turpin here again this evening & I hope a few days more will put an end to the cruel pain she has for some time suffered— With...
Knowing how anxious you would be as to Maria I have written you a few lines by every post since my arrival here—I find however from your letter of the 15. received this morning that only one of my letters has reached you . I am sorry I cannot say that I think Maria much better—She has been threatened within the last two days with a rising of her breast —She took before this scarcely any...
We received last Evening three letters from you—One to Maria & two to myself—I have been kept in albemarle first by a fever which continued five or 6 days and afterwards by the indisposition of Maria who without our being able to assign any reason for it has had her former bad luck & experienced a mishap—She is now I hope well & we shall set out on Tuesday for the Hundred—I have endeavoured...
I have it now in my power to inform you that all obstacles to my happiness are removed, and that in every arrangement as to future residence, I shall be guided by yourself and Maria. I am with sincere regard yours RC ( MHi ); addressed: “Thomas Jefferson Esqr.”; endorsed by TJ as received 19 Dec. 1796 and so recorded in SJL .
My being absent on a trip to the Hundred on the arrival of your letter has occasioned considerable delay in my answer. The arrangements proposed in it for my benefit, while I view them only as new instances on your part of affectionate concern for the welfare of Maria and myself give me great pleasure. When I consider however that you have great and continued calls for money while I have none,...
On my return here from Bermuda-Hundred I found your last letter & as an opportunity to Petersburg offers I inclose two plats one of the Lands lying immediately at the Hundred and the other of My part of Martins Swamp. My Father has always estimated the 2 pieces at £6000—So anxious am I however to purchase higher up the Country that I would willingly make a sacrifice—You are as well acquainted...
Since my note to you from the wharf at the Hundred I have been in daily expectation of having it in my power to make you a sharer in a species of happiness from which my Mary and myself have heretofore been debarred. Fortune has at length crowned our wishes & made us happy in the birth of a daughter —It was born last Evening and tho’ very small has every appearance of good health—Maria has...
We were much gratified in hearing of the health of yourself and all around you—You will receive by the return of the Servant the Public documents a list of which I annex at the end of My letter—With the single exception of my having no newspaper as far back as 1789: it appears to embrace every thing in your memorandom— I feel in regard to this work a solicitude which I cannot easily express. A...