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I have the pleasure to inform you that Mr Eppes passed his examination with credit to himself, and satisfaction to the faculty, & to the Trustees who were present. I have no doubt that his next year will be spent profitably, as I clearly perceive a spirit of literary emulation among the young men here of all Classes. His talents are certainly above par, and his industry induces me to hope &...
Judge Cooper presents his respectful compliments to the President of the United States, and submits to his consideration the inclosed observations differing in some respects from the known Sentiments of the President on the Subject. Judge Cooper hopes and believes that this difference of opinion will occasion no other difference. DLC : Papers of Thomas Jefferson.
Mr Vaughan cut the inclosed out of a Carolina Paper that came here yesterday. I suppose it must have been of date about the last of last month. I understand there have been no cases of sickness but among the irish who work on the Canal. I am with great respect MHi : Coolidge Collection.
M. Leshot found me yet confined to my bed; he gave me 125 Dlrs, and by the time he returns from New York , I shall in all probability be enabled to procure the Stoves. Mr Slack goes tomorrow to Norfolk & thence to Charlottesville . As to the Seal, I must wait till I can get up, and procure a classic drawing of the Peplon. The Peace Minerva, I believe has wings to her helmet. I know of no...
I wrote to you at the Bedford Springs of this State , supposing from what I saw in the newspapers, you might be there. The castings are at last furnished. J. Vaughan has undertaken to forward them according to your directions. The seal is done; & the impression sent to you, which as soon as it receives your approbation I will pay for, as I shall for the castings, when the account is sent to...
I wrote hastily yesterday for fear of losing the post. But as I believe I am in time to day, I write to say that I think there is nothing to be apprehended at Columbia in point of health. There is no swamp, no stagnant water near it; the mist of the River grounds, has never been known to cross the main street; and during the three last years, it has not only been healthy, but singularly so....
Your letter of Ap: 9: 1803 to Dr Priestley and the copy of yr Letter to Dr Rush with a copy of your Syllabus have been preserved by Dr Priestley; but Mr Priestley requests me to say that no public use shall be made of them, or any private Communication by which they can be known beyond the circle of your known and immediate friends: indeed even this is not in any way contemplated, nor do I...
Some time ago I promised the Editor of the Port folio a paper on education, but I neglected it till your letter came. If the inclosed sh d be worth publication, I will send it for that work. Pray oblige me by any remarks that occur to you, so that I may make it as useful as I can; and return it to me. I presume your purpose will be answered by that mode of communication. RC ( MHi ); undated;...
I am much obliged to you for your letter. Our town here is crouded with Presbyterian parsons; they are a systematic and persevering sect, and while they have the address to cajole the people out of their money, their power will encrease. he who has any regard for the peace of himself & his family can venture to stem this tide of fanaticism? About 20 Years hence the prevailing sect among the...
I received a printed copy of your report , for which I thank you. It will serve to furnish more enlarged and more just ideas on the subject of education, than your countrymen have been accustomed to. I rejoice in the prospect of their being put in execution, whether I take any or no part in the Institution to be founded on them. I have been enquiring for workmen as you desired, and I send you...
I acknowledge with many thanks your kind letter giving me an account of your application to Mr Cabell . I shall be able in a year or two to form a very interesting collection of American ores and minerals, which I shall so form and arrange as to be an elementary collection for the use of Tyro’s in my part of the back Country, rather than a curious collection for the amusements amusement of...
M r Ware is absent from Philadelphia I find, in order to take the benefit of the Insolvent Law in Delaware State . A respectable looking Quaker, a M r James has been twice with me, and appears to be a relation much interested in Ware ’s welfare. The result of the conversations is as follows. Ware will thankfully accept the terms you propose as to prices, which he considers as liberal. There...
D r Coxe ’s election comes on the first Tuesday of next month. They talk of deferring the election for chemical professor to the first Tuesday in September. I am not sufficiently instructed to know the causes of this inconvenient determination. I send you, ad interim , a Syllabus of lectures of which I have delivered two courses. They have produced very complimentary letters of approbation...
I congratulate you, on the proper feeling for your long life of meritorious service that seems to pervade every part of our country, and I anticipate from it, in every way, a result such as your friends would wish, and ought to expect. May the attachment of your fellow citizens render the close of your useful life, equally comfortable and honourable. I should not trouble you now with a letter,...
I sent you last winter two printed copies of the report of the legislative committee on the affairs of the College, unanimously adopted by the house. I sent them, because every public testimony in my favour, tends to justify your former kind recommendation of me to the Visitors of your University. I hope that report will serve as sufficient proof that you were not mistaken, the clergy...
M rs Cooper writes to me that no letter has been received from you since my departure from Philadelphia , and desires to know whether she is to set out with her family to Virginia in the beginning of the Summer or sooner. My first course here, will end in June. my second will occupy four months of the next winter, when I shall quit this situation for Charlotte’sville If I am wanted there....
I hope you have received about this time, a copy of my tract on Materialism which I ordered to be sent to you when printed from Philadelphia. I sent you some time ago a third edition of my tract on The Tariff. I see with infinite regret the ignorance or the cowardice of each of the Presidential Candidates on this Question: not one of them dares come out boldly on the one side or on the other...
I send you remarks on your letter to Mr Carr: not much differing from the spirit and substance of my former letter . I do not disagree with you in the least as to the measure of national happiness in the two countries, but the worst government in other respects is certainly the most powerful. Your plan of a Militia, I and Gen l John Steele took pains to recommend about the year 1802–3 but he...
my letter to you respecting Williamsburgh was put in the post before I rec d yours . The Professorship which you do me the honour to propose is yet in the distance. I long to be settled somewhere, almost any where, provided I move to pecuniary advantage; for having the common motive of a family to provide for, I must act on that motive. I have written to Varro at Frankfort . When I am prepared...
I am very sorry to hear of your weak state of health, but I hope to find you better by the comforts of home and rest. M. Correa ’s carriage has undergone repairs, and will not be fit for use till Sunday morning when we propose to set out. I suppose it will require seven days to bring us to Montecello . M rs Cooper declines being of the Party. I defer all further communication, till I have the...
I am much obliged by your kind letter, and I would willingly pursue your advice if I could, by publishing the sequel to the tract I sent you, and which I think conclusive of the question. But the publisher of the tract you have refused to put his name to it as printer, and refused to sell it. I dare not give away any copies; the whole impression is in my library. I have sent one copy to...
I write now in reply to yours from the warm Springs, of the 7 th Instant . D r Patterson is not chosen Chemical Professor, nor do I think he will be. The election does not take place till the first day of September . The event you shall be informed of, without delay. If I should not succeed (a very possible case) M. Correa , M rs Cooper and myself, set out forthwith for Charlotteville . She is...
Foreseeing an approaching storm, I wrote to you, on the chance of being able to find shelter against its effects; but I have expressed myself in my letter to you not so clearly as I ought. I am fully of your opinion, that those who govern your University neither can or ought to give countenance to any rival establishment public or private in its neighbourhood. My views were these: It is...
M. Correa and I will set out about the 16 th . He will have to stay 2 or 3 days in Washington : we then set off for your Place. In mean time, I think the present opportunity afforded us by Hare ’s election ought not to be lost; but the moment should be taken to appeal to the Parents in Virginia , on the strange infatuation of sending their children to be educated here, when they could have...
I received yours of the 8 th yesterday. The contents greatly chagrined me, as it is on every account to be regretted that your Institution cannot go into operation till 1822; and even that period is contingent. I was right in the commencement of our correspondence on this subject, in taking into my calculations the chapter of accidents. I shall request M r Vaughan to transmit you a draught not...
I understand the inclosed report was adopted by the House of R. this morning. There has been every possible effort made on the part of the Presbyterian and Baptist clergy to put down this College, by denouncing it under my care, as the seat of infidelity and tyranny. The report propagated by them throughout this state, North Carolina, and (as M r Preston tells me) Virginia, were, that this...
When I can be at Monticello I cannot yet determine. I attend to your movements. I write to say, that Columbia is situated on a Sand bank. One mile from the River, & 200 feet above it. I believe it to be as healthy, as any place in the Union, if I can judge from what I have seen of the place, & the uniform testimony of its most respectable Inhabitants. The situation impressed me with the common...
I regret that it is not in my power to visit you this Season. I am not only busy preparing for my lectures ( a course of mineralogy and another of Chemistry) but I have undertaken to correct the press for M r Wirt ’s life of Patr. Henry of which about 100 pages are printed. M r Sanders of Williamsburgh called on a friend of mine here, wishing to see me on the Subject of the Coll e ge
M r Richardson has not yet returned. I received y r friendly letter , but I see by the act , that your limits of permanent Salary, are 1000 Dlrs to each Professor. Had I twenty years of probable exertion before me I would accept the situation at once; but I see clearly, that I shall have to commence a new course of labour for the benefit of those who come after me, and be a loser in a...
I sent you some days ago the report of the Senate and the Message of the Governor of this state: I send you now the report of the house of representatives in relation to myself. You will find I have gained a victory: but it will only increase the caution and rancour of my fanatic opponents. & we have scotched the snake, not killed it. Hence my situation is far from comfortable here; for the...