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[ London, 10 Oct. 1785 . Entry in SJL for 15 Oct. 1785 reads: “Mr. Adams. Oct. 10. Inclosing letter to Mr. Grand.” Not found. Enclosure: Evidently a copy of Willem & Jan Willink and Nicolas & Jacob van Staphorst to Ferdinand Grand, 6 Oct. 1785; another copy was sent to TJ by Grand as enclosure to his letter of 10 Oct. 1785 (see note there and TJ to Adams, 18 Oct. 1785 ).
In order to save you the trouble and expence of purchasing horses & carriages, which will not be necessary, I have to inform you that I shall leave in the stables of the United States seven horses and two carriages with harness the property of the United States. These may not be suitable for you, but they will certainly save you a considerable expence as they belong to the studd of the...
Permit me to introduce to you my young Friend Mr. Alexander Edwards of South Carolina, a modest and amiable young Gentleman who came particularly recommended to me, and whom I have found by Several Months Acquaintance to merit every Attention and Encouragement. I am, my dear Sir yours most affectionately, RC ( DLC ).
give me Leave to introduce to you Mr John Brown Cutting, who will need no other Recommendation, than his own Genius. Let me beg your acceptance, too of a Sett of my Defence, &c and let me know your Opinion of the Second Vol.—and whether it is worth my While to write a third upon Confederations. &c. Yours most Sincerely DLC : Papers of Thomas Jefferson.
[ London, 6 Dec. 1787. Recorded in SJL as received 17 Dec. 1787, “recommending of Cerisier.” Not found. Antoine-Marie Cerisier, French historian and diplomat, was attached to the French embassy in Holland, where Adams met him in 1780 (Didot, Nouvelle biographie générale; Adams, Works , I , 330; vii , 492).]
Permit me to introduce to you my young Friend Mr Alexander Edwards of South Carolina, a modest and amiable young Gentleman who came particularly recommended to me, and whom I have found by Several Months Acquaintance to merit every Attention and Encouragement. I am, my dear Sir, yours most affectionately DLC : Papers of Thomas Jefferson.
[ Paris, 23 June 1783 . There is recorded in SJL , under date of 16 Apr. 1784, the receipt of a letter from “J. Adams. Paris. June 23. by Mazzei.” Mazzei landed at Hampton, Virginia, in Nov. 1783, but he did not forward Adams’ letter for some months; see Mazzei to TJ, 4 Apr. 1784 , and Mazzei, Memoirs , p. 274. Adams’ letter to TJ has not been found.]
Dr Gordon who is about publishing his Proposals for printing his History desires a Letter to you.—I told him that he might depend upon your good offices without any Letter, but as no harm will be done by complying with his Desire I beg Leave to introduce him, and to recommend his History to your Patronage in France. With equal affection, Esteem and / respect, I have the Honour to be, Sir /...
As you are a Friend to American Manufactures under proper restrictions, especially Manufactures of the domestic kind, I take the Liberty of Sending you by the Post a Packett containing two Pieces of Homespun lately produced in this quarter by One who was honoured in his youth with Some of your Attention and much of your kindness. All of my Family whom you formerly knew are well. My Daughter...
I last night received, the Ratification of my last Loan and the inclosed Resolution of Congress of 18 July last, for the Redemption of Prisoners at Algiers.—It is probable you have received it before, but as it is, in your Department to execute it, and possible that you may not have received it, I thought it Safest to transmit it to you, as I have now the honour to do, here inclosed. Mr...
I ought not to have neglected so long to write you an account of the delightful visit I received from M r and M rs Cooledge, M rs C— deserves all the high praises I have constantly heard concerning her, She entertained me with accounts of your sentiments of human life, which accorded so perfectly with mine that it gave me great delight—In one point however I could not agree—she said, she had...
I am honoured with yours of the 11 th. with the enclosures from M r Lamb, M r Carmichael and M r Barclay. I am not Surprized that M r Lamb, has only discovered that our means are inadequate, without learning the Sum that would be Sufficient. Il faut marchander avec ces Gens la.— They must be beaten down as low as possible. but We shall find at last the Terms very dear. The Algerines will never...
I found that either the Duke of Dorsetts Letter to the Premier, had produced an order at Dover or that his Graces Letter to the Custom House Office had as good an Effect, for I was allowed to pass without Molestation, and indeed received Marks of particular Respect. We arrived Yesterday 26. in the Afternoon, and as Fortune would have it Coll Smith arrived the Night before 25.— We Soon met.— I...
Our Secretary of State for foreign Affairs, in a Letter of 13. Ap. informs me, that he wrote Us a Letter by Capt. Lamb dated 11. March, inclosing a Variety of Papers respecting the Treaties We are directed to negotiate and conclude with the Barbary Powers. inclosed is a Copy of a Resolution of Congress of 14. Feb. 1785, inclosed to me, in the Secretary’s Letter.— I know nothing of Capt Lambs...
The Bearer of this Letter, after an Education at our Cambridge, travelled with J. Q. A. to Russia, spent two years in looking at parts of Europe, returned to Boston, read Law with one of our first Professors in Boston, is admitted to the Bar, and now Wishes to have the honour of Seeing Montecello and paying his respects to President Jefferson. His Name is Francis C. Gray a Son of our Lt...
Your Letter of March 21 st I will communicate to Mr Bowditch, and Pickering— You may put my Letters upon the subject of Tracy’s Book into any hands you please, with or without any verbal alterations, as you may think fitt—“what you would have them, make them.” or as James Otis used to say to Samuel Adams—here take it. and “ Quicu Weticu ” it—— I am obliged to borrow the hand of a friend to...
The sight of your well known hand writing in your favour of 25. Feb. last, gave me great pleasure, as it proved your arm to be restored and your pen still manageable—may it continue till you shall become as perfect a calvinist as I am in one particular. Poor Calvins infirmities his rheumatism his gouts and sciatics made him frequently cry out Mon dieu Jusque au quand . Lord how long! Prat once...
I inclose you a National Register, to convince you that the Essex Register is not to blame for printing the Mecklingburg County Resolutions, on the Contrary I think it to be Commended—for if those Resolutions were genuine they ought to be published in every Gazette in the World—If they are one of those tricks which our fashionable Men in England call hoax’es and boares—they ought to be printed...
The Project of a new Constitution, has Objections against it, to which I find it difficult to reconcile my self, but I am so unfortunate as to differ somewhat from you in the Articles, according to your last kind Letter. You are afraid of the one—I, of the few. We agree perfectly that the many should have a full fair and perfect Representation.—You are Apprehensive of Monarchy; I, of...
In answer to your enquiry in your letter of the 4th. inst. I can only say that I knew Mr. Matzei at Paris and that he made long journeys. But in what stile he lived and at what expence he travelled I know not. He always made a genteel appearance without any unnecessary show, and kept good Company wherever he went. I observed this in Paris and heard of it in Holland. In Italy it could not be...
Was you ever acquainted with Dugald Stuart—before I left France I received a letter from Benjamin Vaughn Esq re in London—Introducing, and recommending in strong terms two Gentlemen from Scotland, one by the name of Dugald Stuart and the other Lord—whose name and title I forgot—as young Gentlemen of great talents and attainments sufficient to deminish our American prejudices against Scotland—I...
Permit me to introduce to your acquaintance, a young Lawyer by the name of Josiah Quincy, and with the title of Coll. being an Aid to our Governor. The name of Coll. Quincy has never I believe been extinct for two hundred years. He is a Son of our excellent Mayor of the City of Boston and possesses a character unstained and irreproachable. I applaud his ambition to visit Monticello and its...
If I am not humble I ought to be, when I find myself under the necessity of borrowing a juvenile hand to acknowledge your kind favour of the 19.th: I have read your university report throughout with great pleasure, and hearty approbation; Of Tracy’s report I have read as much as I could, the translation appears to me an original written with all the purity, accuracy, and elegance, of its...
Your friend Professor Ticknor is bound upon a Tour in Virginia, though he needs no introduction to you he has requested a letter from me, and I cannot deny him,—he carries his Lady with him; who is rich enough, and handsome enough, & amiable enough; And what can we say more— Is the present calm in the Political World to continue long or not? Our controversy will be settled in a short time, and...
Give me Leave to introduce to you Mr. Samuel Hartley a Relation of the late Minister at Paris. He has Business at Paris which he will explain to you, whether you can be of any Service to him in that or not, your Civilities will be very agreable to him and oblige Dear Sir your most humble Servant, RC ( DLC ). Noted in SJL as received 31 Apr. [1 May?] “by Mr. S. Hartley and Colo. Jas. Hartley.”
Mr. Preston has at last found and sent me your Letter. Dr. Bancroft spoke to me, about Commodore Jones’s Demand upon Denmark: but upon looking into the Papers we found that the Commodore is recommended by Congress wholly to the Minister at the Court of Versailles, so that We were apprehensive our Powers would be disputed. The Danish Minister however was not here; I offered to go with Dr....
I am dil i gently & laboriously occupied, in reading & hearing your “political economy”—I call it yours because I do not believe that Tracy’s is more of an original in point of purity, perspiculty or precission—I have read as yet only to the 90 th page—it is a connected chain of ideas and propositions, of which I know not which link to strike out. His philosophy appears to me to be precisely...
I have just read a sketch of the life of Swedenborg, and a larger work in two huge volumes of Memoirs of John Westley by Southey, and your kind letter of January 22d came to hand in the nick of time to furnish me with a very rational exclamation, “What a bedlamite is man!” They are histories of Galvanism and Mesmerism thrown into hotch potch they say that these men were honest and sincere, so...
inclosed is a Letter to M r Lamb & another to M r Randall: if you Approve them please to Sign them and send them on, Why those Gentlemen have lingered in Spain I know not. I have long expected to hear of their Arrival in Paris. Possibly they wait for orders. if so, the inclosed will answer the End. The Chev. De Pinto told me on Wednesday that he had orders from his Court to inform me, that the...
I have now the Honour to inform you, that having shewn my Commission to the Right Honourable the Marquis of Carmarthen, and left an authenticated Copy together with a Copy of my Letter of Credence to the King according to the usage, I had the Honour on the first of this Month to be introduced by his Lordship to his Majesty, in his Closet with all the Ceremonies and Formalities, practised on...