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    • Adams, John
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    • Jefferson, Thomas
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Documents filtered by: Author="Adams, John" AND Recipient="Jefferson, Thomas" AND Recipient="Jefferson, Thomas" AND Period="Madison Presidency"
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Never mind it, my dear Sir, if I write four Letters to your one: your one is worth more than my four. It is true that I can Say and have Said nothing new on the Subject of Government. yet I did Say in my Defence and in my Discourses on Davila, though in an uncouth Style, what was new to Lock , to Harrington , to Milton , to Hume to Montesquieu to Reauseau , to Turgot , Condorcet
The Bearer of this Letter, after an Education at our Cambridge, travelled with J. Q. A. to Russia, spent two years in looking at parts of Europe, returned to Boston, read Law with one of our first Professors in Boston, is admitted to the Bar, and now Wishes to have the honour of Seeing Montecello and paying his respects to President Jefferson. His Name is Francis C. Gray a Son of our Lt...
Education, which you brought into View in one of your Letters; is a subject so vast, and the systems of Writers are, So various and so contradictory: that human Life is too short to examine it: and a Man must die before he can learn to bring up his Children. The Phylosophers, Divines, Politicians and Pædagogues, who have published their Theories and Practices, in this apartment are without...
The most exalted of our young Genius’s in Boston have an Ambition to See Montecello, its Library and Sage. I lately gave a Line of Introduction to Mr Everett, our most celebrated Youth: But his Calls at home, forced him back from Washington. George Ticknor Esquire who will have the Honour to present this to you, has a reputation here, equal to the Character given him in the enclosed Letter...
Samuel B. Malcom Esqr, is not wholly a Stranger to you. He was three years in my family in the Character of my private Secretary, and I believe his conduct appeared to you, as it invariably did to me ingenuous, candid faithful and industrious. His Friends in New York were among the most respectable; his Education was public and his Studies and in the Law and introduction to the Bar regular...
I recd. yesterday your favour of May 27th. I lament with you the loss of Rush. I know of no Character living or dead who has done more real good in America. Robert Treat Paine still lives, at 83 or 84, alert drol and witty though deaf. Floyd I believe, yet remains. Paine must be very great; Philosopher and Christian; to live under the Afflictions of his Family. Sons and Daughters with Genius...
The Bearer of this Letter, after an Education at our Cambridge , travelled with J.Q.A. to Russia , Spent two years in looking at parts of Europe , returned to Boston , read Law with one of our first Professors in Boston , is admitted to the Bar, and now Wishes to have the honour of Seeing Montecello and paying his respects to President Jefferson
As you are a Friend to American Manufactures under proper restrictions, especially Manufactures of the domestic kind, I take the Liberty of Sending you by the Post a Packett containing two Pieces of Homespun lately produced in this quarter by One who was honoured in his youth with Some of your Attention and much of your kindness. All of my Family whom you formerly knew are well. My Daughter...
The most exalted of our young Genius’s in Boston have an Ambition to See Montecello , its Library and its Sage. I lately gave a Line of Introduction to M r Everett , our most celebrated Youth: But his Calls at home, forced him back from Washington . George Ticknor Esquire who will have the Honour to present this to you, has a reputation here, equal to the Character given him in the enclosed...
I have great pleasure in giving this Letter to the Gentleman who requests it. The Revd David Edward Everett, the Successor of Mr Buckminster and Thatcher and Cooper in the politest Congregation in Boston, and probably the first litterary Character of his Age and State, is very desirous of Seeing Mr Jefferson. I hope he will arrive before your Library is translated to Washington. By the Way I...