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The excellent president, governor, ambassador and chief justice, John Jay, whose name, by accident, was not subscribed on the declaration of independence , as it ought to have been, for he was one of its ablest and faithfulest supporters. A splendid star just setting below the horizon. Printed Source--Niles’ Register..
I have received with more pleasure than I can express and with something too much like envy which I detest, your well-known correct exact hand writing of the 11 of this month and with equal gratitude your noble present of the journal of Debates &ca the N.Y State convention. Although this respectable volume is printed in a so small a type that it will be impossible for me ever to read it I will...
I thank you for your kind favour of the 11th. which I have this moment received, and Soon determined that an acknowledgement of it should not be So long delayed. You have done, with dignity and propriety all that can be done. A publication of your letters to Mr Duane and his Answers would place him in a ridiculous light. But Duane Cobbet and Calender are Such excentric Characters that it Seems...
I received, last night your kind favour of the 7th. Your design of writing to Mr Duane for Copies of our “very Short journals” as he calls them, is judicious, and all that is necessary. I am under no concern about Mr Duane’s Extracts or Copies, because Congress has ordered our Journals to be printed and they are in a course of publication. Although I am ashamed of mine, yet I know that Shame...
I must beg your pardon for delaying so long the acknowledgement of your kind favour—you have done all that is necessary to be done with Mr Duane—The sume of the matter is I suppose is—he has ploughed the Son of the Heifer in the Secretary of States Office—and procured copies of some of your communications to Congress—My letter to Jonathan Jackson, which was unfortunately and absurdly laid...
I thank you for your favour of the 20th. your letter to Mr Duane comprehends every thing necessary to be said upon this occasion, and I presume will remove all difficulties— I congratulate you on the firmness of your nerves fully demonstrated by your hand writing, the beauty and firmness of which is equal to the best of your former days mine are so debilitated that I can neither write—or...
The sight of your hand writing and your name is to me a cordial for low Spirits. I wish I could give you a specimen of mine as beautifully written; but a pen will not obey the command of my paralytick nerves—The 5th Vol: of Dr. Franklin’s works, mentioned in your kind letter of 27th February, I have never seen, nor any preceding Vol: except the first. What the Editor Mr: William Temple...
Sketches of the Life and Character of Patrick Henry, by William Wirt of Richmond Virginia has been Sent to me by Mr Shaw of the Atheneum. My Family are reading it to me every Evening, and though We have not finished it, We have proceeded far enough to excite an earnest desire to know your Opinion of it There is a Section fourth, page 108. a passage which no Man now living but yourself can...
I rejoice in the incident, which has called me, to give you a certificate under my hand, that I am yet alive. The Reverend, Mr Henry Colman, an ordained minister of a Congregational Church in Hingham (General Lincolns town,) six miles only from me, has requested of me an introduction, to you as one of the most interesting characters, our Country has produced. Mr Colman is beloved by his people...
Mr. Davies, who appreciates your character as he ought, having expressed a desire to be personally acquainted with you, I promised him a letter of introduction. I comply with this promise with the greater pleasure, as the impressions which this Gentleman has made upon me induce me to believe that you will be glad of the opportunity of making his acquaintance. He is Attorney of the UStates for...
Mr Elsworth afflicted with the Gravel and the Gout in his kidneys and intending to pass the Winter in the south of France after a few Weeks in England, has resigned his office of Chief Justice, and I have nominated you to your old station. This is as independent of the Inconstancy of the People, as it is of the Will of a President. In the future Administration of our Country the firmest...
I received, last week your friendly private Letter of the tenth—The assurance of the continuance of your friendship was unnecessary for me, because I have never had a doubt of it—But others invent and report as they please. They have preserved hitherto, however more delicacy to wards the friendship between you and me than any other. The last Mission to France, and the consequent dismission of...
It is an awkward thing now to tell you that it was early my intention to send you the inclosed. But it is nevertheless true that the idea was repeatedly in my mind with the design of executing it & was as often driven out by the distractions of business &c. Always very truly   Dr Sir   yr Obed ser ALS , sold by Forest H. Sweet, Battle Creek, Michigan, January, 1958, Lot No. 141. Jay endorsed...
I thank you for your three letters in compliance with my request. They contain what I desired. But as they mingle the fact, respecting the communication of my letter to you to Lord Grenville, which I always understood to be confidential, I will thank you to send me a certificate of the sentiment which you recollect to have been given by me, and I will beg you to let it be as full and as...
I have occasion for a public purpose to allude to the reprobated instructions to our commissioners for making peace with Great Britain obliging them to act under the direction of the French Assembly. But though I have a general recollection of their tenor it is not precise enough for my object. I take it for granted your papers can afford the exact information. You will much oblige me by...
You have been informed of the loss of our Election in this City. It is also known that we have been unfortunate throughout Long Island & in West Chester. According to the Returns hitherto, it is too probable that we lose our Senators for this District. The moral certainty therefore is that there will be an Anti-fœderal Majority in the Ensuing Legislature, and this very high probability is that...
We are all here very anxious for the success of Mr Coleman. We know his abilities and we believe in his integrity. Your good disposition towards him is well understood—Yet it is feared that his pecuniary situation may prove an obstacle. It is undoubtedly a good rule to avoid embarrassed men in appointments—yet this like every other general rule may admit of exceptions in special cases. If I...
The completion of the works in the vicinity of our City proceeds heavily. Some embarrassment is understood to arise in the War Department from the Question of Appropriations. I beg to be informed whether the sum appropriated by the Legislature of this State will come in aid of the Operation. Limited as that sum is, nothing upon a large scale can be undertaken in reference to it. Its Agency in...
The survey of this port to the narrows inclusively has been executed and the expence defrayed out of the funds of the Corporation. But it is interesting to the question of the defence of our port to have a survey of the bay below the narrows to Sandy Hook. There are sand banks critically situated which merit consideration as proper sites for fortification. Such a survey was made under the...
After a plan for fortifying our port shall have been settled, the execution of it with energy & dispatch will demand a very great portion of the time and attention of a competent character as Superintendant. This task I cannot undertake consistently with my other occupations. Col Burr will be very equal to it and will I believe undertake it, if an adequate compensation be annexed. He would...
I have received your Letter of the 25th. Various circumstances have prevented my being ready to make the Report you desire. The Survey of the Port made while I was at Philadelphia was but partial; not extending beyond the Narrows. A survey of the lower part of the Bay, which presents some objects worthy of Consideration, was effected by some of the Commanders of the British Army—And is in the...
I am informed by my son at New York, that Mr. Samuel B. Malcom has applied for an office under your Excellency, ad and desired me to write to you in his behalf. This I can do without hesitation and with pleasure. Mr. Malcom lived in my family as my private Secretary for about an year and half, and conducted himself always like an amiable and honorable young gentleman. In my service he was...
New York, December 18, 1798. “You may remember that I have heretofore recommended to you Mr. Inglis, who studied the law with me, for the Office of Notary. He entertains an idea that a vacancy for such an appointment now exists, and has reminded me of my promise to be useful to him—I with pleasure reiterate my recommendation.…” ALS , Columbia University Libraries. Space left blank in MS. James...
Your letter of the 5 of November has recently reached me at this place and found me amongst avocations that scarcely leave me a moment to spare. You will probably have learnt from General Clarkson that the survey of the Port has been completed. But I do not recollect that I have had any answer to a suggestion in one of my letters respecting the employment of Engineers to assist in forming the...
The Attorney General has shewn me, in confidence, a late letter of yours to him and has asked my good offices as far as may consist with my judgment. These I always readily yield to misfortune. I have had a full and minute explanation with him of the money subject, and in my mind, there results a full conviction that there is no cause of reproach from that source, whatever may have been...
I received this day a letter from the President of the United States, requesting me to concert with you the plan, & to superintend the execution of it, for giving effect to the Act of the Legislature of this state for the further Defence of this state and for other purposes. This I am accordingly ready to do, whenever you shall be pleased to require it. With very great respect & esteem I have...
I received last night your favour of the 26. of September, with a Copy of an Act of the Legislature of the sState of New York, for the further Defence of the State and for other Purposes. I shall transmit these Papers to the Secretary at War, that a proper consultation may be had upon their Contents and a final Arrangement made according to Rules which generally obtain in Such Cases. In the...
The death of Mr. Remsen presents a vacancy of Notary which will be sought. Two applications are made to me—one by James Inglis Junr. who has just finished a Clerkship with me & taken a license as Atty in the Supreme Court—the other William Coleman lately connected in law business with Col Burr. Inglis is a young man of handsome abilities, of application & of irreproacheable conduct. He is a...
I beg your pardon for having omitted to attend earlier to the suggestion in your letter of the 30th. of August respecting the defence of our ports. I am sincere in saying that a charge of this kind would on various accounts be unpleasant to me among the rest as likely to involve ill natured & foolish criticism. But I shall not decline the trust if you think proper to repose it provided the...
I had last night the pleasure to receive the letter your Excellency did me the honor to write me on the 21st of this month inclosing the resolutions of the Senate & assembly of New York & their unanimous address. I can scarcely imagine any event that could do me more honor or give me greater satisfaction. The unanimity of New–York, of vast importance in the union, is an happy omen of success...