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Documents filtered by: Recipient="Jay, John"
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You may read my Letter that covers this, to your Aunts Depeyster & Chambers, to prevent any exceptions at what we propose abo t . Peter, and let them act therein as they think best— Make my Complim ts . to Doct r . Johnson and tell him that I’m very sorry for M r . Punderson’s & the Peoples disappointm ts :, and ^ that ^ I wish it mayn’t prove unfortun te
it’s very long since I’ve recd: any Letters from you. I recd: last Post a Letter from Doctr: Johnson who remembers his Love to you and is desirous that you should write to him, and he would be glad to know how the College goes on now— I would have you gratify him w th a Letter next week per the Post, w ch . he has a right to expect from you, and altho I believe things go on well in the College...
Your Letter and Box p r . Barker is received—y r Letter p r . Alley was deliver’d me since Fady was here,— it’s more safe to send y r . Letters &c a . p r . Barker— Your observation on the Study of the Law, I believe, is very just, and as it’s y r inclination to be of that Profession, I hope you’ll closely attend to it with a firm Resolution that no difficultyes in prossecuting that Study...
I should long since have answered your kind Letter but heard you & Benson intended me a Visit in the Vacation, which I should have been very glad of, & since that, I have been much engaged either in Company riding or writing.— It was with much pleasure that I received your Letter & the Account you gave me of the good Condition of things at the College since I left it, for which I am no less...
Your letter and the Boy were immediately sent to M r . Punderson, who I’ve not seen since but am informed that he is well pleased with him. Seal the inclosed before you deliv r : it to M r . Kissam and you may conclude an agreem nt with him, viz t : To pay him £200 when the time of y r . being with him Commences, that is, immediately after the passing of y r Degrees at College in May next, tho...
I have recd: your Letter of last Friday.— I’m of your oppinion that M r . Ernest’s Terms are too high—I shall be well pleas d : to have you lodg’d at M rs . John Livingston’s or any other more private Family than I take D—n’s to be, & w th . whom (between us) I apprehend it would not sute very well—If you can get suted near M r . Kissam’s or in that part of the Town, it will be more convenient...
I’ve not receiv’d a line from you since I left Town—the Post told me ^ this Morn g : ^ the Commencem t . is this Day, so that I suppose you’ll come up next Thursday w th . Barker—and you may go down w th . me again tomorrow Senight, in ord r . to settle w th . M r . Kissam, acquain
On receipt of this Letter, you must immediately deliver the inclosed to M r . Auchmuty— As much noise is made in Town abo t . Jemmy’s suffering the Bills of the Govern rs . of the College to be returned protested, I send you the rough draught of my Letter to M r . Auchmuty on that head—Jemmy is indeed very remiss for ^ in ^ not sending his Reasons to them for his Proceedg s :, and so are the...
I have been strongly sollicited to take a Jaunt with Mr. Inglis to Philadelphia, and he proposes to set offon Tuesday next. I have consented to go provided my horse is well, and News of the Repeal of the Stamp Act should not arrive in the mean Time. Will You then be good enough to send my Horse down by a careful hand, if he is fit to go the Journey; and as upon the Repeal of the Stamp Act, we...
We were last Night strangely deluded with a mistaken account of the Repeal of the Stamp Act; and all the Bells have been ringing since Break of Day—Upon Enquiry We find that the Intelligence amounts to no more than that the Bill had passed the House of Commons on the 28 of Feb y and so was to be sent up to the Lords on the 3 d . March. There is indeed a Letter dated at Falmouth on the 5 th ....