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Press copy of ALS : Massachusetts Historical Society; copy: Library of Congress Since the Letter I had the honour of writing to your Excellency on the 19th. Inst, the Duke de Lauzun is arrived at Versailles from Virginia, with the glorious News of the combined Force of America & France having forced General Cornwallis to capitulate. The English Garrison marched out of York Town on the 19th of...
Paris, 21 May 1783. PRINTED: JA , D&A , 3:131–134 . LbC ( Adams Papers ); APM Reel 109. LbC-Tr ( Adams Papers ); APM Reel 103. This memorial was Hartley’s response to the article that the commissioners had proposed on 29 April to open American and British ports to virtually unrestricted free trade, to which Hartley had at least tentatively agreed ( calendared, above
Since the Letter I had the honour of writing to your Excellency on the 19 th . Inst, the Duke de Lauzun is arrived at Versailles from Virginia, with the glorious News of the combined Force of America & France having forced General Cornwallis to capitulate. The English Garrison marched out of York Town on the 19 th of Oct r . with the honour of War, & laid down their Arms: the Troops consisted...
Congress were yesterday pleased to pass the enclosed Resolutions on the subject of the payment of British Debts— The language they speak requires no Comment— I complained in my last of your long Silence, or rather laid before you the Complaint of Congress. These I think receive additional force from Intelligence I have since had, that the Negotiations are still going on, and that important...
Since the Early Period When I Had the Happiness to Be Adopted Among the Sons of America, I ever Made it My Point to do that Which I thought Would prove Useful to Her Cause or Agreable to Her Citizens— After We Had Long Stood By ourselves, France did join in our Quarrell, and So Soon as Count d’Estaing’s departure Made My Presence Unnecessary, I Had a Permission to Return to France Where, Among...
It is some Months ago since I had the honor to write you, & am well persuaded, altho I received no Answer thereto, that it will have engaged your attention. I earnestly wish it may have been productive of an Improvement to the Finances of Congress which I then foresaw would be short of our Wants & which is unfortunately too much the case at present. Last Month I remitted to the Honorable R t....
I may venture to write to you as whatever is useful to human Nature Cannot but be Pleasing. as nothing in the world is So useful and beneficial as Government founded on Comon Equity and prudance— So nothing ^ is ^ So Delights my mind as the Contemplation of the Happiness of having a Part in the well Regulated Comunity— Their is Such a Charm in good order and Stedy Descipline that the World ^...
Knowing the expectations of the Kings ministers that a full Indemnity shall be provided for the whole Body of Refugees, either by a restitution of their property, or by some stipulated compensation for their lossess, & being confident, as I have repeatedly assured you, that your refusal upon this point will be the great obstacle to a Conclusion and Ratification of that Peace which is meant as...
Two copies: Massachusetts Historical Society; AL (draft): New York Public Library; transcript: National Archives On the morning of March 12 Congress learned from the hand of Joshua Barney, captain of the packet General Washington , that the American peace commissioners had signed conditional preliminary articles with Great Britain on November 30, 1782. In addition to delivering the provisional...
Upon the receipt of the provisional Articles & a subsequent account brôt by a Vessel dispatched by Count d’Estaing, I wrote the Letter N o. 1. to S r. Guy Carleton, & N o. 2. to Admiral Digby: to which I recieved the Answers N o. 3. & 4. You will find them cold & distant— Those they wrote to the Minister of France, in answer to similar Communications made by him, were still more so, and...