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LS : Public Record Office; copies: William L. Clements Library, Library of Congress, Massachusetts Historical Society We have received the Letter which you did us the honour to write on the 12th. Inst. and shall take the first Opportunity of conveying to Congress the agreable Information contained in it. The Sentiments & Sensations which the Re-establishment of Peace between our two Countries,...
LS : Public Record Office; AL (drafts): American Philosophical Society, Massachusetts Historical Society; copies: William L. Clements Library, Library of Congress, Massachusetts Historical Society, National Archives We have the honour to inform you that we have just received from Congress their Ratification in due Form of the Provisional Articles of the 30th. of November 1782, and we are ready...
Copies: William L. Clements Library, Massachusetts Historical Society, National Archives, Archives du Ministère des affaires étrangères; press copy of copy and transcript: National Archives Propositions made to Mr Hartley for the definitive Treaty— 1st To omit in the Definitive Treaty the Exception at the End of the 2d Article of the Provisional Treaty: Viz: these Words “Excepting such Islands...
Copies: National Archives, William L. Clements Library, Library of Congress, Massachusetts Historical Society; press copy of copy: National Archives The American Ministers Plenipotentiary for making Peace with great Britain, present their Compliments to Mr. Hartley. They regret that Mr. Hartley’s Instructions will not permit him to sign the Definitive Treaty of Peace with America at the Place...
ALS (draft): Library of Congress; copy: Massachusetts Historical Society; copy and transcript: Library of Congress; two copies: National Archives <Passy, June 16, 1778: I received yours of the 5th, informing us that the government has agreed to an exchange of prisoners, and we have written Captain Jones for the list; it contains, I understand, at least two hundred men. We expect ours to be...
I am obliged to you for a Letter of the 14th of August, which was this day delivered me, by your Friend. You was not misinformed when you heard that the Object of my Appointment, was Peace; nor do I differ from your Opinion that this Appointment was honourable; altho I See no Prospect at all, of ever acting in Virtue of it. War, will not last forever it is true: but it will probably last long...
Paris, 22 May 1783. PRINTED: JA , D&A , 3:125–127 . LbC-Tr ( Adams Papers ); APM Reel 103. With this offer the commissioners sought to counter Hartley’s proposal of the previous day (above) as well as the 14 May Order in Council. They proposed an agreement whereby both parties would appoint ministers to negotiate a permanent commercial treaty. Until such time as an agreement was concluded,...
[ Paris, 29 April 1783 ]. PRINTED: JA , D&A , 3:114–115 . MS ( Adams Papers ). LbC ( Adams Papers ); APM Reel 109. LbC-Tr
Copies: William L. Clements Library, Library of Congress, Massachusetts Historical Society (two), National Archives (two), Archives du Ministère des affaires étrangères; transcript: National Archives Answers to Mr Hartleys six Propositions for the definitive Treaty— To the 1st This matter has been already regulated in the 5th & 6th Articles of the Provisional Treaty to the utmost extent of our...
The American Ministers Plenipotentiary for making Peace with great Britain, present their Compliments to M r. Hartley. They regret that M r. Hartley’s Instructions will not permit him to sign the Definitive Treaty of Peace with America, at the Place appointed for the Signature of the others. They will nevertheless have the Honour of waiting upon Mr. Hartley at his Lodgings at Paris, for the...
Propositions made to M r Hartley for the Definitive Treaty— 1 st To omit in the Definitive Treaty, the Exception at the End of the 2 nd Article of the Provisional Treaty, viz, these words, “Excepting such Islands as now are, or heretofore have been within the Limits of the said Province of Nova Scotia[”] Article 2 dly The Prisoners made respectively by the arms of his Britannic Majesty and the...
We have the honour to inform you that we have just received from Congress their Ratification in due Form of the Provisional Articles of the 30 th. of November 1782, and we are ready to exchange Ratifications with his Britannic Majesty’s Ministers as soon as may be. By the same Articles it is stipulated, that his Britannic Majesty shall with all convenient Speed, and without causing any...
Answers to M r Hartley’s six Propositions for the definitive Treaty To the 1 st This Matter has been already regulated in the 5 th and 6 th Articles of the Provisional Treaty to the utmost extent of our Powers: The Rest must be left to the several States— 2 d. All the Lakes, Rivers and Waters, divided by the Boundary Line or Lines, between the United States and his Britannic Majesty’s...
LS : M.H. Venables, Bristol, England (1976); copy and transcript: Library of Congress I received duly yours of the 2d Inst. I am sorry you have had so much Trouble in the Affair of the Prisoners. You have been deceived as well as we. No Cartel Ship has yet appear’d. And it is now evident that the Delays have been of Design, to give more Opportunity of seducing the Men by Promises and...
ALS : Harvard University Library I arrived here on Friday Evening, and the next morning was unanimously chosen by the General Assembly a Delegate for the ensuing Congress, which is to meet on Wednesday. You will have heard before this reaches you of the Commencement of a Civil War; the End of it perhaps neither myself, nor you, who are much younger, may live to see. I find here all Ranks of...
Copy: Library of Congress It is some time since I procured the Discharge of your Capt. Stephenson. He did not call here in his Way home. I hope he arrived safely, and had a happy Meeting with his friends and family. I have long postponed answering your Letter of the 29th. of June. A principal Point in it, on which you seemed to desire my Opinion, was the Conduct you thought America ought to...
ALS : National Library of Scotland; transcript: Library of Congress I have heard nothing from you lately concerning the Exchange of the Prisoners. Is that Affair dropt? Winter is coming on apace. I understand that your charitable Contribution is near expended, and not likely to be renewed. Many of those unfortunate People must suffer greatly. I wish to have a Line from you, informing me what...
Copy and transcript: Library of Congress; copy: Archives du Ministère des affaires étrangères I received your several favours, viz: One of April the 10 one of the 20th. and two of the 22d. all on the same Day but by different Conveyances. I need not repeat, what we have each of us so often repeated, the Wish for Peace. I will begin by frankly assuring you that tho’ I think a direct, immediate...
Copy and transcript: Library of Congress It is a long time Since I have had the Pleasure of hearing from you. Your last favours received were two of the 24th of June, and one of july 5. The second Cargo of Prisoners you mentioned is since safely arrived. M. Schweighauser wrote to me that the Captain of the Cartel was impatient to return, and as Capt. Babcock of the general Mifflin, and others...
Transcript: Library of Congress I am exceedingly obliged by your interesting yourself so warmly in behalf of those unhappy people. I understand you advanc’d money: Your bills on that account will be punctually paid. As yet I have heard of none. Understanding that a certain Person promised to make proposals for healing a certain Breach, I postpon’d and delayed a material Operation till I should...
Copy: Library of Congress I wrote a few Lines to you the 31st. past, and promised to write more fully. On pursuing again your Letters of the 11th. 12th. & 21st. I do not find any Notice taken of one from me dated Feby. 16. I therefore now send you a Copy made from it in the Press. The uncertainty of safe Transmission discourages a free Communication of Sentiments on these important Affairs;...
Extract printed in Benjamin Vaughan, ed., Political, Miscellaneous, and Philosophical Pieces . . . Written by Benj. Franklin . . . (London, 1779), pp. 555–6; copy: D. A. F. H. H. Hartley Russell, on deposit in the Berkshire Record Office (1955); copy: Library of Congress I wish as ardently as you can do for peace, and should rejoice exceedingly in co-operating with you to that end. But every...
Copy: Library of Congress I have just received your favour of the 23d. past, in which you mention, “that the Alliance between France and America is the great Stumbling Block, in the way of Making Peace,” and you go on to observe, that whatever Engagements America “may have entred into, they may, (at least by consent of Parties) be relinquished for the purpose of removing so material an...
LS , copy, and transcript: Library of Congress I am glad to hear that another Cargo of Prisoners are on the Way. I will give Directions to assemble an equal Number immediately at Nantes in order to dispatch the Cartel with all Expedition: And I will direct Mr. Schweighauser to correspond more exactly with the Board, and send Returns of the Prisoners as desired. I shall endeavour to obtain...
ALS : Library of Congress; copies: National Maritime Museum, Public Record Office; transcript: Library of Congress I received your Favour of the 9th. Instant, with a Copy of the Letter from the Admiralty Office relative to the proposed Exchange of Prisoners, in which the precise Number of those we have here is desired. I cannot at present give it you, they being dispers’d in different Ports;...
Transcript: Library of Congress I received yours without Date, containing an old Scotch Sonnet full of natural Sentiment and beautiful Simplicity, I cannot make an entire application of it to present Circumstances; but taking it in Parts, and changing Persons, some of it is extreamly a propos . First Jenie may be supposed old England and Jamie America. Jenie laments the Loss of Jamie, and...
LS and copy: Library of Congress I received, my dear Friends, kind Letter of the 15th. Instant, and immediately communicated your Request of a Passport to M. le Comte de Vergennes. His Answer, which I have but just received, expresses an Apprehention that the Circumstance of granting a Passport to you, as you mention the Purpose of your coming to be the discoursing with me on the Subject of...
ALS : D.A.F.H.H. Hartley Russell (1955) on deposit in the Berkshire County Record Office I received your very kind Letters of Oct. 29, 31, & Nov. 8. I thank you much for the Receipt you send me. It may be of use hereafter, tho’ at present the Gravel has left me. I shall send the Book you desire by Mr Vaughan. And you may depend on my doing every thing in my Power to serve the Person you...
Reprinted in William Temple Franklin, ed., Memoirs of the Life and Writings of Benjamin Franklin … (3 vols., 4to, London, 1817–18), II , 269. I received your favour of September 26, containing your very judicious proposition of securing the spectators in the opera and play-houses from the danger of fire. I communicated it where it might be useful. You will see by the inclosed that the subject...
ALS : Historical Society of Pennsylvania; LS : Keya Gallery, New York (1997); copy: William L. Clements Library I have just received your Favours of March 11 & 12. forwarded to me by Mr. Digges, and another of the 21st. per Post. I congratulate you on the returning good Disposition of your Nation towards America, which appears in the Resolutions of Parliamt. that you have sent me: and I hope...