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[ Annapolis, 24 Mch. 1784 . Entry in SJL reads: “Govr. Introducing McAlister.” Letter not found; see Virginia delegates to Harrison, 22 Mch. 1784 .]
[ Annapolis, 8 May 1784 . Entry in SJL reads: “Govr. Valedictory-tender of service to state.” Not found.]
[ Annapolis, 12 Dec. 1783 . Entry in SJL reads: “Governor. Definitive treaty—British proclamation on commerce.” Not found.]
[ Annapolis, 16 Apr. 1784. Entry in SJL reads: “Govr. Loan office debt established—requisitions reduced.” Not found.]
[ Annapolis, 27 Apr. 1784. Entry in SJL reads: “Govr. Post delays—not stopped here—Genl. W’s postage—M[ercer]’s letter of Apr. 10.” Not found.]
No post having arrived here from the Southward during the present month till this day, and being to return in a few minutes I am obliged without an opportunity of asking the concurrence of my collegues to inclose you a copy of the proclamation of the Definitive treaty and of it’s ratification which happily took place on the 14th. instant. Two officers were immediately dispatched to seek...
A few days after my arrival here Colo. Le Maire writer of the inclosed letter called on me and asked me to forward it to you with such explanations as I could give. As to his commission , having lost the original as he therein mentions, he asks an authenticated copy of it which he thinks will enforce some applications he is making to this government. As to the lands, I remember the gift of...
Since my last nothing material has occurred. The Indiana Company some days ago preferred a petition to Congress respecting their Claim. Jersey patronized the Interest of her Citizens and wished a fœderal Court to determine the validity of the purchase. It was however negatived on this principle; That the lands lay within the limits of Virginia and could be affected by the decision of no other...
Since my letter of this morning the post has arrived and brought us a letter from Dr. Franklin of Mar. 9. He had received a letter from Congress informing him of the reasons of delaying our ratification. He apprehends no difficulty from this circumstance, and the rather as he had received a letter from Mr. Hartley dated Mar. 2. (the day before the exchange should have taken place) desiring he...
We have received no foreign intelligence through any authentic channel since the letter from Dr. Franklin of Dec. 25. an extract from which I formerly did myself the honour of inclosing you. Through different ways however, such as to merit beleif, we have information that the utmost confusion prevails in the British government. The House of commons on the 16th of January came to a vote that...
I have had the honor to receive your letter of the 7th inst: enclosing an Act of the General Assembly, which passed at my request. This new proof of the confidence repos’d in me by my Country, lays me under additional obligations to it; and I am equally sensible of its favors, and the polite & friendly wishes with which you accompanied the act. If the etiquette of business makes it necessary...
Letter not found. 13 September 1783 . In a letter of 26 September to the Virginia delegates in Congress ( q.v. ), Governor Harrison acknowledged receipt of their letter dated thirteen days earlier. This letter, now missing, was written by Joseph Jones on behalf of the Virginia delegation and forwarded by Harrison on 20 October to John Tyler for submission by him to the Virginia General...
Mr. Jeffersons letter of this date will give your Excellency every Communication that is worth transmitting. Nothing therefore remains for me; but to manifest the Attention which I shall always feel myself happy in paying to every request which you may think proper to honour me with. I have conferred with Mr. Jefferson on the expediency of his acting as a Commissioner for extending the...
Printed text ( Burnett, Letters Edmund C. Burnett, ed., Letters of Members of the Continental Congress (8 vols.; Washington, 1921–36). , VII, 301, and n. 1). Probably written by John Francis Mercer, who signed it, and possibly also signed by Joseph Jones and JM. The original manuscript has not been found, although about 1930 it was among the Executive Papers in the Virginia State Library. We...
Your Excellencies favour of the 2nd. Inst. I was this day honoured with. It was not my Idea or that of any Gentleman in the Delegation to introduce the complaint of Mr. Cammel to the view of Congress, if justice to our Citizens could be obtained by any other means. I am happy to be informed by your Excellency that the business is in a train that promises so amicable a conclusion. Since the...
I have the honour to inform your Excellency that Congress have accepted the Cession of our Western Territory: and we have in conformity to the Act of the General Assembly of Virginia executed a deed for the same. This I trust will pave the way for similar Cessions from other States and lay the foundation for the discharge of our domestic debts. Congress have appointed Commissioners for the...
I do myself the honor to enclose your Excellency a Copy of the resolution of Assembly, voting a Bust in honor of the Marquis Fayette, and to inform you that the Speaker communicated to both Houses of Assembly the Marquis’s Letter of acknowledgment —and am, with due respect, Your Excellencys Most obedt & humble servt ALS , DLC:GW . John Beckley (1757–1807) arrived in Virginia from England in...
The duty of correspondence for the Month being devolved on me, and no authentic intelligence from abroad having been received, I have it in my power to communicate to you only what we get through the channel of the public papers. The inclosed will present to you some of the late debates of the H. of Commons, their addresses to the king and his answers. These seem to exclude the prospect of...
Long as the enclosed letter & petition appear to have been written, they never came to my hands until thursday last; the latter, altho’ called a copy, having the marks of an original paper; another copy accompanying it, inducing a belief that it is so, I delay not a moment to hand it forward. My being perfectly ignorant of the laws of the Commonwealth, & unacquainted, if such confiscations...
I have had the honor to receive your favor of the 2d—What you have asked of the Secretary at War, if obtained, is all I conceive essential to illucidate the accounts of the old & present impositions on the public—the rolls in the pay office might serve as checks to those of the Musters; but where all these are to be met with, I know not, as the Troops of Virginia were, by order of Congress,...
Since our late dispatches from Mr. Adams we have received nothing from our ministers in Europe. By these we were informed of his and Mr. Jay’s arrival in London, but as Congress hath appointed neither of these Gentlemen to that court, nor directed the scene of negotiation even with that power to be chang’d from Paris, we presume their attendance there is merely on a private visit. As yet no...
The present week affords us nothing new for communication unless it be the affecting scene of yesterday. Genl. Washington then had his last audience of Congress, laid down his commission and bid a final adieu to them and to all public life. His address on the occasion was worthy of him. This you will see in the public papers. I cannot help expressing my extreme anxiety at our present critical...
In the first moments after my return I take the liberty of sending you a copy of the Constitution which the Fœderal Convention has submitted to the People of these States. I accompany it with no observations—your own Judgment will at once descover the good, and the exceptionable parts of it. and your experience of the difficulty’s which have ever arisen when attempts have been made to...
I wrote you by the last post that some objections had been started in debate on the justice of that part of the national debt which consists in loan office certificates . The doubt was new to me. I had always considered this to be as honest a debt as any we owed: perhaps a more tender one in most cases, as being due to daughters, to younger children, to widows &c. It proved in event to be the...
The inclosed papers from Oliver Pollock came to our hands a few days ago. Ignorance of the organization of our government probably led him to make this improper address, on a business so foreign to the line of our duty. We take the liberty, on his behalf, of inclosing them to your Excellency with a copy of our answer to him. We have the honour to be with the most profound respect & esteem Your...
Letters from Holland from the middle to the last of September inform us that the citizens of the Dutch states are all in commotion. The conduct of the Prince of Orange having been such as greatly to strengthen the republican party, they are now pressing in the firmest tone a restoration of their constitutional rights. Friesland, as usual, leads the way. They have demanded of the sovereign...
I do myself the honor of inclosing you an act of Congress on the subject of Western territory as passed a few days ago. The Ordinance for opening the land office so soon as our purchases are made from the Indians is not yet passed. I also inclose a copy of the estimate and requisitions of the year as they passed Congress. This however you will shortly receive from the President officially....
No authentic intelligence from Europe. Public papers as late as the 27th. of January state Mr. Pitt and his associates as still in office, but having a decided majority against them in the House of commons. The king seems well affected to them, and the city of London also. He probably would dissolve the commons in hopes of getting a new house under the influence of his ministry; but the...
The bearer hereof Colo. Le Maire who was in the service of the Comw. of Virga. during the late war informs me that he is about to apply to Your Excellency on some occasion on which he would wish you to be satisfied of his rank and services in that state, and that the capture of his person effects and papers by the enemy has put it out of his power to produce to you his commission which would...
We inclose to your Excellency by the bearer Mr. McAlister an Exemplification of the deed of Cession executed according to the directions of the act of assembly transmitted us, and have the honor to be with very high respect Your Excellency’s Most obedt. & most humble servt. Text from facsimile in Amer. Art Assoc. Catalogue, Turner-Munn Sale, 21–22 Jan. 1926, Lot 271, where it is erroneously...
RC (Virginia State Library). In the hand of Theodorick Bland, except for the signatures of Arthur Lee and John F. Mercer. Docketed: “Letter f’m Virga. Delegates 4th. Oct. 83. inclosg resolve of Congress of 5th August. relative to the offer made by Virga. of public Vessels. & of Oct. 3d. on subject of the Govrs. Letter &c. 1783.” For the absence of JM’s signature, see Delegates to Harrison, 24...
We do ourselves the honor of transmitting to your Excellency, a Copy of the Journals of Congress, which will compleat the one already sent you by the Secretary as far as printed. From these it will appear that Congress has resolv’d to adjourn on the 3d. of June ensuing, to meet at Trenton in Jersey, on the 30th. of October next, and to the different Questions which this measure gave rise to,...
RC (Virginia State Library). Cover missing. Addressed to “His Excellency Benjamin Harrison Esqr.” In the hand of John Francis Mercer, except for Arthur Lee’s signature. For the absence of JM’s signature, see Delegates to Harrison, 24 June 1783 , ed. n. The present letter and the other one of the same date from the delegates to Governor Harrison were given a single docket, reading “Delegates...
We have the honor to inclose to your Excellency the copy of a petition from some of the inhabitants of the Kentucky district, lately presented to Congress. It was read when seven States were on the floor and it seem’d to be their disposition to pay no attention to it. Sometime afterwards we mov’d that it might be committed to us to be transmitted to your Excellency and this motion was...
It is not easy for me to decide by which my mind was most affected upon the receipt of your letter of the 6th inst.—surprize or gratitude: both were greater than I have words to express. The attention & good wishes which the Assembly have evidenced by their act for vesting in me 150 shares in the navigation of each of the rivers Potomac & James, is more than mere compliment—there is an...
The letter of July 20. 1784 with which your Excellency was pleased to honour me and which inclosed the resolution of assembly for the statue of Genl. Washington came to my hands on the 29th. of Nov. by Mr. Short: and a few days afterwards I received a duplicate of it. As it was not practicable to get the business into any train before the sailing of the December packet, I omitted acknol– eging...
I had the honour of writing to your Excellency on the 12th. instant on the subject of the Definitive treaty. On the day following we made up a Congress of seven states, but nine being requisite to ratify the treaty, we have been unable to get this done; and of course till it be ratified Congress can make no communications on the subject to the states. I am sorry to say that I see no immediate...
I must first apologize for not sending you a copy of the constitutions before this by assuring you that the first inquiry I made on my arrival here was to obtain one and that soon as I procure one from Phila. for which purpose I have particularly instructed Mr. Murray I will transmit it. During the winter we have had so few States on the floor that we have been able to do but little of any...
My friendship is not in the least lessened by the difference which has taken place in our political sentiments; nor is my regard for you diminished by the part you have acted. Men’s minds are as varient as their faces, and, where the motives to their actions are pure, the operation of the former is no more to be imputed to them as a crime, than the appearance of the latter: for both being the...
GW’s letter to Governor Harrison marks his return to public life as the leader of a movement to form a public company for improving the navigation of the upper Potomac and linking it with the waters of the Ohio. He first became deeply involved in schemes for opening up the Potomac in the early 1770s (see particularly the source note and its references in Thomas Johnson to GW, 18 June 1770 )....
RC (Virginia State Library). In the hand of John Francis Mercer, except for the signatures of Theodorick Bland, Jr., and Arthur Lee. Docketed, “Virginia Delegates Sept. 8th. 1783.” For the absence of JM’s signature, see Delegates to Harrison, 24 June 1783 , ed. n. This Post brought us no Letter from your Excellency, & little has ocurred with us since our last communications, worthy your...
RC (Virginia State Library). Cover missing. Addressed to “His Excellency Benjamin Harrison.” In the hand of John Francis Mercer, except for Arthur Lee’s signature. For the absence of JM’s signature, see Delegates to Harrison, 24 June 1783 , ed. n. The present letter and the other one of 1 November from the delegates to Governor Harrison were given a single docket, reading “Delegates letters....
I have just had the pleasure to receive your letter of the 8th—for the friendly & affectionate terms in which you have welcomed my return to this Country & to private life; & for the favourable light in which you are pleased to consider, & express your sense of my past services, you have my warmest & most grateful acknowledgments. That the prospect before us is, as you justly observe, fair,...
Your Excellency’s letter of the 25th. Ult. on the determination of Congress as to their future residence has been duly received. You would doubtless soon after have heard of their subsequent determination on the same subject. As all this had taken place before my arrival I can give you an account only from the information of others. Congress, it seems, thought it best to generalize their first...
In my letter of the 3d inst. I mentioned to you the gazette account of a change in the British ministry. Just in the moment of the departure of the post we received a letter from the Marquis Fayette confirming the account of the change and rectifying that of the vote of the Prince of Wales. The letter which had come here supposed the king a friend to the E. India bill and that the Prince voted...
Mr. Hardy’s illness and Colo. Mercer’s absence deranged the order in which the office of corresponding member was to pass; so that Mr. Lee exercised it for January, Colo. Monroe for Feb. and Mr. Hardy takes it for the present month. I mention this that my own correspondence as an individual may not at any time be mistaken as having passed the sanction of the delegation. On receiving the act of...