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Your favour of June 1. did not come to hand till the 3d of September. I immediately made enquiries on the subject of the frigate you had authorised your relation to sell to this government, and I found that he had long before that sold her to government, and sold her very well as I understood. I noted the price on the back of your letter, which I have since unfortunately mislaid so that I...
After a long & boisterous passage, my Nephew G.A. Washington returned to this place a few days since, & delivered me your letter of the 25th of April. Under the state of the case between you & Capt: Gun, I give it as my decided opinion that your honor & reputation will not only stand perfectly acquited for the non-acceptance of his challenge, but that your prudence & judgment would have been...
A few days ago, by the post, on wch of late there seems to be no dependance, I wrote you a few lines expressive of an earnest wish that you could make it convenient to be at the Genl Meeting of the Society of Cincinnati, before you took your departure for South Carolina. I did not then, nor can I now, assign all my reasons for it; but to me it should seem indispensable, that the Meeting in May...
From the purport of your letter dated at New Port Feby 16th which only came to my hands yesterday I have little expectation that this reply to it will find you in the state of Rhode Island—If however the case should be otherwise it is to express an earnest wish that you might make it convenient to take the general meeting of the Cincinnati in your way to So. Carolina. I was concerned to hear...
It gives me infinite satisfaction to transmit you the inclosed Copy of a Resolve of Congress of the 18 Inst. which was put into my hands yesterday. Perfectly coinciding with the sentiments which Congress have expressed on this occasion I shall feel the greatest pleasure in complying with their Resolve—but I must request you to inform me where the pieces of ordnance are to be found and to what...
By this time I presume My Dear General you have returned to your ancient residence. I had the pleasure of seeing Mrs. Greene at New York; and was induced by her to hope you would be prevailed upon to become a fellow citizen of ours. I know you have long had a partiality for our state; but I have been afraid, and have not yet banished my apprehensions, that your new Mistress would detach you...
I inclose you a couple of letters from Mr. Carter one for yourself, the other for Mr. Kenlock. There is nothing for me to add, except that I wish you when the business shall be transacted to transmit the bond to me under cover to General Schuyler at Albany. I expect to leave this shortly for that place and to remain there ’till New York is evacuated; on which event I shall set down there...
I have been favored with two Letters from you—One under the 16th of March, the other of the 3d of April. And Yesterday I had the pleasure to receive that of the 20th of April, by your Express Boat to Philadelphia. The Subjects of the two first are superceeded by the Arrival of Peace. an Event, on which I return you my Congratulations with the utmost sincerity & Cordiality, an Event, to the...
I have the pleasure to inclose to you a Letter from the Marquis de la Fayette, which came under Cover to me, by the Packet Triumph, dispatched by the Marquis & the Count de Estaing from Cadiz to Philadelphia. All the accounts which this Vessel has bro’t, of a Conclusion of a General Peace, you will receive, before this can reach you. You will give the highest credit to my Sincerity, when I beg...
I do myself the honor to hand you herewith, a Contract entered into by Mr. John Banks, for the subsistence of the troops in the service of the United States, in the States of North Carolina, South Carolina and Georgia, for the present year. I am really concerned, that we have been obliged to close this contract, on the execessive high terms agreed to, but the circumstances, under which we had...
I have the pleasure to inform you that your Packet for Govr Greene which came enclosed to me (in your private Letter of the 12th of December) was forwarded in an hour after it came to my hands by a Gentleman returning to Rhode Island (Welcome Arnold Esq.)—there can be no doubt therefore of its having got safe to the Governor. It is with a pleasure which friend ship only is susceptible of I...
On the 18th of Decr I wrote a long Letter, advising you very fully of the state of affairs in this part of the Continent—since that time I have had the pleasure to receive your three favors of the 6th 10th & 19th of the Same Month—I scarcely need assure you that the intelligence communicated in your last of the liberation of the Southern States from the power of the Enemy, has afforded us...
“The sufferings of your troops have impressed me with the deepest concern, and the very painful sensations, which your relation of them excites, are powerfully enhanced, that these distresses should have been the lot of an army, not only entitled, by special contract, to better fare, but whose meritorious and gallant exertions under the most extreme difficulties, merited a very different fate;...
Some days ago, I was honored with your answer to my letter of resignation; the very warm approbation, given of my conduct in public service, gives me most singular pleasure and satisfaction, and makes me hope for that countenance and aid in private life, which I enjoyed, while I had the pleasure to serve under your command. I must beg your attention to a brig of Mr. Banks’s, which he loaded at...
By the southern Mail of last Week I received your Letter of the 4th of Octr enclosing the Returns of your Army: and I am just now favored with that of the 11th of Novr covering the Returns for the Month of October—As I find by the latter, you had received Mine of the 23d of Septr. I can have no occasion to suggest any thing farther at this time respecting the disposition of the Troops after...
Since writing to you, I have received yours of the 26th of August, covering a duplicate of one of the 12th. At the same Time, came to hand your favor of the 29th informg the Excursions of the Enemy for Rice, and inclosing a copy of General Gists Letter to you of the 27th. In my last, which was the 23d of Septemr, and which was forwarded under the Care of the Secretary at War, I gave a compleat...
I have had the pleasure to receive a few days ago, your private Letter , by the same conveyance which brought your public Dispatches of the 26th & 29th of August—I seized the first safe conveyance to forward the family Letters to the care of Governor Greene. In answer to your request, that I would give you my sentiments on the future Plans of the Enemy, I need scarcely premise, that in the...
It is an age since I have either written to you or received a line from you; yet I persuade myself you have not been the less convinced of my affectionate attachment and warm participation in all those events which have given you that place in your countrys esteem and approbation which I have know⟨n⟩ you to deserve while your enemies and rivals were most active in sullying your reputation. You...
Since my last of the 6th of August, I have recd your favors of the 6th of June 11th of July and 12th of Augt. I hope before this reaches you, you will be in possession of Charles town, and will have found a glorious end to your difficulties and distresses in the Southern Quarter. An application from the Government of South Carolina produced the Resolve of which the inclosed is a Copy, and...
In my last Letter of the 7th of July, in which I acknowledged your several favors of the 22d of April & 19th of May, I mentioned my expectation of soon meeting the Count de Rochambeau in Philadelphia, and my intention of writing you from that place in case any thing of moment should turn up in the mean while—But as our hopes, that public Dispatches would have arrived from France before our...
Your Letter of the 22 of April also Your two favors of the 19th of May, with the Returns of the Army under your Command, have been duly received; but having been in momently expectation that intelligence would arrive from Europe, or some other event turn up, which might disclose the intentions of the Enemy, & give a clue for the final determination of the Operations of the Campaign , I have...
Your three Favours of 7th 13th & 15th of April are received—with their several Inclosures. A Variety of circumstances at this Time conspire to prevent an ultimate Decission upon the operations of the Campaign. Before this can reach you, a total change of Men and Measures, which has taken place in Great Britain, will be announced to you—what will be the Consequences of this Revolution, cannot...
Your Favor of the 8th of february was acknowledged in mine of the 18th of March. I have now received yours of the 9th ulto coverg Copy of your Correspondence with the Count de Rochambeau, & a general Return of your Army. Your Apprehensions, in Consequence of the Movement of the Legion of Lauzun, need not be much alarmed— Portion in Code . The Recruits raising in the States from whence your...
I have your favr of the 24th of January and your public and private letter of the 7th of February—It gives me the more pain to hear of your distresses for want of Cloathing or other necessaries, as you are at so great a distance that you cannot be suddenly relieved, even if we had the means. I am not however without hopes, that should the War be continued to the southward (of which I have my...
I am desired by the Superintendant of Finance, to make you acquainted with a mode which he has fallen upon to supply the Officers with Cloathing and to explain to you the reasons why it will operate upon the Officers, under your Command, in a manner different from what it will upon those to the Southward. Our dependance for Officers cloathing was upon a quantity expected in the ship Marquis de...
I have received your favor of the 9th of December from the Round O, inclosing the Copy of your letter of the same date to Congress. I regret that your plan for the surprise of the port of Dorchester did not take full effect.The maneuvre was a masterly one, and, at least, answered the purpose of dislodging the enemy, which was a great point gained. The Count de Rochambeau has transmitted me a...
In my last, which was on the 31st of December, I informed you that an embarkation said to consist of three British Regiments and a detachment of Foreigners was upon the point of sailing, and thought to be destined to the southward—They did sail, and I suppose have been long since arrived, but my first intelligence was wrong as to numbers. The British Regiments did not embark, and, from the...
Since my last of the 19th inst. I have recd information, which does not admit of a doubt, that an embarkation has taken place at New York, it is said to consist of three British Regiments and a detachment of the Hessian Grenadiers. They may probably have sailed by this time, but of this I have no certain accounts—They are to be convoyed by two ships of the Line and two or three Frigates—It is...
Your private letter of the 22d Ulto came to my hands the day before yesterday, and giving fresh assurances of your attachment & regard for me was received with gratitude and Affection. As I feel myself interested in every thing which concerns you it is with unfeigned pleasure I hear the plaudits which are bestowed on your conduct by Men of all descriptions—public & private—and I communicate...
I have successively received your favours of the 30th of October, & the 2d and 21st of November. I thank you for your Congratulations on an event which is certainly most important, considered in a public View, and which adds to my personal satisfaction, by finding that it, in some degree, relieves you from that load of difficulty and distress with which you had so long been contending—The...
I wrote you so fully & freely by Lieut. Colo. Lee, who left me about the 29th ulto, that I have at this Time but little else to say, than to acknowledge the Rect of your Letter of the 25th ulto, which came to hand two Days ago, and by which I am surprized to find that you have received nothing from me later than the 28th of Septemr. Since my last, the American Troops destined to the Northward,...
I wrote you the 24th instant, which went on thro’ the Hands of Genl Sumner in No. Carolina—previous to which I had permitted Colo. Lee to inclose to you a Copy of the Articles of Capitulation, which were dispached, with an Injunction that they should not be printed. I have delayed writing further, waiting the Return of Colo. Lee, who I am informed has taken a Tour to Port Royal. It now...
I wrote you on the 16th inst. giving a detail of occurrences to that time—on the next day a proposal was received in Writing from Lord Cornwallis, for a meeting of Comissioners to consult on terms for the Surrender of the Posts of York & Gloucester—This proposition the first that passed between us, led to a Corespondence which terminated in a definitive Capitulation which was agreed to and...
My Letter of 6th instant by Colo. Morris informed you that our Trenches would be opened that Night—they were so—without discovery or Losses at the Distance of about 600 yds—from that time to the 9th—we were employed in compleatg our first Parallel & constructing Batteries—on the 9th & 10th—Our Fire from Cannons & Mortars commenced very Briskly & had a very good Effect upon the Enemys...
How happy am I my dear Sir, in at length having it in my power to congratulate you upon a victory as splendid as I hope it will prove important. Fortune must have been coy indeed had she not yielded at last to so persevering a pursuer as you have been—I hope now she is yours, she will change her appellation of fickle to that of constant. I can say with sincerity that I feel the highest degree...
In my Letter of the 27th ulto which went by Colo. Stewart, I informed you that I expected to open Trenches before York Town by the 1st of Octo. A variety of Causes, among which the Want of sufficient Transportation, has been a principal One, has prevented that Event taking Place, ’till this Day—the Trenches will be opened this Night. The whole Army moved from Williamsburg on the 28th & took...
Memorandums for Lt Colo. Morris to be communicated to no person but to Major General Greene. General Greene to be informed fully as he has been shortly by letter that there was no alternative left—Count de Grasse’s destination was fixed to the Chesapeak and therefore as Lord Cornwallis was found there and in a most inviting situation, the operation against him took place of necessity. General...
I am very sorry to observe in your Letter of the 6th Augst a Complaint, that you have heard nothing from me since the 1st June—many Letters have been written to you since that Time—some of very particular Importance—This failure gives me Reason to fear some foul Play on the Route. The last I wrote to you was from Philadelphia, of the 4th of this instant Month—informg that the Plan of our...
Two Days ago, I received your Favors of the 6th & 7th of August by Colo. Morris: As he does not return imediately, & as I have a favorable Opportunity of writing by a Gentleman, who is recomended by Mr Bee, I will give you a Sketch of our Proceedings, Circumstances & Prospects, without entering into a Detail of Affairs, which however, I will not fail to communicate, as soon as Matters have...
This letter will, probably, be delivered to you by Mr Fitzhugh—third son to Colo. Fitzhugh of Maryland—who is desirous of obtaining an appointment in Baylors Dragoons. Mr Fitzhugh is a stranger to me, but is spoken of as a promising young man, just from his Studies—Such characters is an acquisition to any Corps—I shall be obliged to you for introducing him to my namesake as a fit person to...
With peculiar Satisfaction I do myself the Honor to acknowlege the Receipt of your several Favors of the 10th 14th & 16th of May last—with that of the 22nd of June—and to assure you at the same Time, that it is with the warmest pleasure I express my full Approbation of the various Movements and Operations which your Military Conduct hath lately exhibited; while I confess to you that I am...
RC (William L. Clements Library, University of Michigan). The inclosed papers will furnish you with the most important foreign intelligence we have lately received. And of what has been done by Congress in consequence thereof. We thought it necessary to give you this communication, not knowing how far [it ma]y influence your future operations [so t]hat you might thereby be enabled to take your...
I have received your favors of the 22nd and 27th of April enclosing Copies of your Letters to Congress. The difficulties which you daily encounter and surmount with your small force, add not a little to your reputation, and I am pretty well assured that should you be obliged finally to withdraw from South and even from North Carolina, it will not be attributed to either your want of abilities...
RC (William L. Clements Library, University of Michigan). JM had been appointed on 23 October 1780 as a member of the committee ( Papers of Madison William T. Hutchinson, William M. E. Rachal, et al ., eds., The Papers of James Madison (2 vols. to date; Chicago, 1962——). , II, 206 ). The inclosed paper will give you the substance of the latest intelligence Congress have received from Europe....
New Windsor [ New York ] April 22, 1781 . Approves of Greene’s tactics against Cornwallis. Reports that Pennsylvania line will be delayed. Hopes that Greene will be able to employ Major William Macpherson. Df , in writing of H, George Washington Papers, Library of Congress.
Since mine to you of the 19th I have received your letter of the 29th of March, with the Copy of one to Congress of the 30th. The sequel of Cornwallis’s late movements do as much honor to you as discredit to him. He is so far baffled—’Tis deplorable that the composition of your force did not enable you to make it more. The project you had adopted of endeavouring to transfer the War has many...
I acknowlege myself to have been unpardonably delinquent in not having written to you before; but my matrimonial occupations have scarcely left me leisure or inclination for any other. I must now be brief as the post is just setting out. I shall shortly write you at large. I have not been much in the way of knowing sentiments out of the army; but as far as I am acquainted with them either in...
New Windsor [ New York ] April 19, 1781 . Is pleased with Greene’s successful attack on Cornwallis. States that the southern situation is still critical and that a new British expedition is preparing for either Delaware, Virginia, or North Carolina. Df , in writing of H, George Washington Papers, Library of Congress.
I duly received your letter of the 17th of March inclosing the copy of one of the 16th to the President of Congress—The motives which induced you to hazard a battle appear to me to have been substantial—I am happy to find by your subsequent letter to Congress, that the retreat of Cornwallis in circumstances of distress corresponded with your expectations. I still however regard your affairs as...
Your private letter of the 18th Ulto came safe to hand—although the honors of the field did not fall to your lot, I am convinced you deserved them. The chances of War are various—and the best concerted measures, and the most flattering prospects may, & often do deceive us, especially while we are in the power of Militia. The motives which induced you to seek an Action with Lord Cornwallis are...