You
have
selected

  • Recipient

    • Greene, Nathanael
  • Period

    • Revolutionary War

Author

Sort: Frequency / Alphabetical

Show: Top 9

Dates From

Dates To

Search help
Documents filtered by: Recipient="Greene, Nathanael" AND Period="Revolutionary War"
Results 1-30 of 274 sorted by author
  • |<
  • <<
  • <
  • Page 1
  • >
  • >>
  • >|
Yours of 28 Ultimo is before me. It is certain that Religion and Morality, have no less obligation upon Armies, than upon Cities and contribute no less to the Happiness of Soldiers than of Citizens. There is one Principle of Religion, which has contributed vastly to the Excellence of Armies, who had very little else of Religion or Morality, the Principle I mean is the Sacred obligation of...
I never before took hold of a Pen, to write to my Friend General Green, without Pleasure, but I think myself obliged to do it now upon a Subject that gives me a great deal of Pain. The Three Letters from, the Generals Sullivan, Green and Knox, have interrupted the Deliberations of Congress, and given many of the Members of it much Uneasiness. They thought themselves bound, in Honour and...
During the civil Wars in Rome, in the Time of Sylla, and young Marius, after the Death of the Elder Marius, Sylla commanded one Army against Mithridates King of Pontus, and Fimbria another. Both were in Arms against the Same foreign Enemy: but Sylla and Fimbria were equally Enemies to each other, commanding different Armies in the Service of different Parties at Rome, which were disputing...
I had, last Evening the Pleasure of yours of March 3. by your Brother, to whom in his Business to this Place I shall give all the Assistance in my Power. In whose favour the Ballance of Letters lies, I cant Say: but if I am in debt, in Point of Numbers it must be because Some of my Remittances have miscarried. I am not yet entirely convinced, that We are playing a desperate Game, tho I must...
Your Favour of the 14 of July is before me. I am happy to find your Sentiments concerning the Rewards of the Army, and the Promotion of Officers So nearly agreable to mine. I wish the general sense here was more nearly agreable to them. Time I hope will introduce a proper sense of Justice in those Cases where it may for Want of Knowledge and Experience be wanting. The New England Collonells,...
Yours of the 27th of April I am to acknowledge. I cannot concur with you in Sentiment because the Enimy did not go to Philadelphia last December that they had no intention then or since of going there. I am of opinion if the Enemy could have got over the Delaware immediately after our Army crosd it, it would have been agreeable to their wishes. Had they effected it before the Junction of our...
Yours of the 2d Instant, came duly to hand. The Indifference of the People about recruiting the Army, is a Circumstance, which ought to make Us, consider what are the Causes of it. It is not, merely the Melancholly, arising from the unfortunate Events of the last Campaign, but the Small Pox, and above all the unhappy State of our Finances, which occasion this Evil. There are other...
Give me Leave, by the Opportunity of the Viscount de Noailles, to take this Method of reviving a Correspondence, which has been interupted almost three Years, but was one of the most pleasing I ever had. It is unnecessary to say any thing of the Expedition with which this Letter is intended to go, because I hope it will reveal itself to You, in Accounts which will make themselves heard and...
Your Favour of the second Instant has lain by me, I suppose these Eighteen days, but I fear I shall often have occasion to make Apologies for Such omissions, which will never happen from Want of Respect, but I fear very often for Want of Time. Your Reasoning, to prove the Equity, and the Policy of making Provision for the Unfortunate Officer, or soldier, is extreamly just, and cannot be...
Yours of the 7th. was brought me this Morning. My Meaning was that if the Conduct of our Army, had depended on me, I should have taken more Pains to have obtained exact Information of the Enemies Numbers, and our own, and should have considered every Indication of the Enemies Intentions of coming to Philadelphia more particularly. Altho, there is no doubt that Congress have Authority to direct...
In considering a Letter from the General, sometime ago, in the Board of War, it was agreed to report to Congress a Resolution, approving of the Laboratory at Sprin g field, and such a Report was made, but upon some Opposition to it, it was ordered to lye on the Table, where it has lain ever since. I will, move to have it taken up and determined. Some Gentlemen will oppose it, par­ ticularly...
I do myself the honor to hand you herewith, a Contract entered into by Mr. John Banks, for the subsistence of the troops in the service of the United States, in the States of North Carolina, South Carolina and Georgia, for the present year. I am really concerned, that we have been obliged to close this contract, on the execessive high terms agreed to, but the circumstances, under which we had...
Some days ago, I was honored with your answer to my letter of resignation; the very warm approbation, given of my conduct in public service, gives me most singular pleasure and satisfaction, and makes me hope for that countenance and aid in private life, which I enjoyed, while I had the pleasure to serve under your command. I must beg your attention to a brig of Mr. Banks’s, which he loaded at...
When you ask my opinion as a friend, I must always act the part of a true friend, however frequently the advice I give may happen to clash with your feelings justly irritated by injuries which you have not merited. Considering the Board of treasury as so many individuals, the complexion of their letter to you would abundantly justify the asperity of your reply; but considering them as a public...
Have you received any directions from The General concerning some espontoons to be brought from Fish Kill for the use of the Officers here? If you have not be pleased to receive them now and give directions accordingly. Yr. obedient humble serv ALS , Library of the American Philosophical Society, Philadelphia.
It is an age since I have either written to you or received a line from you; yet I persuade myself you have not been the less convinced of my affectionate attachment and warm participation in all those events which have given you that place in your countrys esteem and approbation which I have know⟨n⟩ you to deserve while your enemies and rivals were most active in sullying your reputation. You...
It is determined that General Du Portail and myself should go to Count D Estaing. We proceed to New Windsor this afternoon and set out from thence before light tomorrow. Four horses will be necessary to accomodate us, as I am dismounted & General Du Portail is loth to wear out his own horses in the journey. Will you be so good as to send me an order on the person at New Windsor who provides...
Mr. Duryee has applied to The General to have a Barn of his released, taken up for the use of the hospital, representing that from its situation relatively to his dwelling house it will produce greater inconvience to him than the taking some other barn in the neighbourhood will produce to its proprietor. The General would wish to avoid every thing that would look like discrimenation without...
I am sadly distressed for want of a good saddle &c; and such is my situation, that I have no opportunity of procuring for myself. The one I got by your order the other day was of a coarser kind that would only do for my servant. As you are in the way of procuring matters of this kind, you will oblige me much, if you will give orders for purchasing a good saddle bridle holsters &c. for me....
It is found necessary to send surgeons with the detachments on the lines, and they must have horses to convey their Chirurgical apparatus. Will it be most convenient to get them from you by special application or to obtain them from the Brigades? This question the General orders me to make. Yr. very humble serv ALS , Library of The American Philosophical Society, Philadelphia.
We have to request, you will order a couple of very good teams to be got ready to proceed to the enemy’s lines for General Lee’s baggage. He is to come out on parole, on Sunday morning. You will judge when they ought to set out from here—suppose tomorrow noon, so as to get in the neighbourhood of Vandeering’s Mill by tomorrow night. When they are ready to set out tomorrow let them make report...
His Excellency requests you will have an exact return made of the total strength of the Pensylvania batalions, in which you will designate the different terms of service, for which the men are engaged. He is aware there is ony one distinction, between those for during the war and those for three years or during the war . He wants to know the precise number of each. The Board of war have...
The horse I borrowed of you the other day giving out while we were on Staten Island, my servant exchanged him there for another. The one he took in lieu of him I now return. I believe the public will lose nothing by the exchange. I omitted informing you that a couple of horses which I received here from Col Abeel on my way to the French fleet were on my return delivered at this place to Lt Col...
I really do not think it would be an adviseable measure to detach a brigade, for though I should not apprehend any material danger here, yet I think without some substantial object, it would hardly be prudent to lessen our force. There are possible events that might at least embarrass us. But my principal objection arises from my considering a compliance rather as a bad precedent; if you yield...
There has just been unfolded at this place a scene of the blackest treason, Arnold has fled to the Enemy. André the British Adjt Genl is in our possession as a Spy. This capture unravelled the mystery. West Point was to have been the Sacrifice, all the dispositions have been made for the purpose and ’tis possible, tho’ not probable to night may still see the execution. The wind is fair, I came...
The General has given me some memorandums for instructions to you on the subject of the Northern preparations. He is however undecided on one point—How far the preparation for vessels ought to be pushed. It was his wish when the resolution to discontinue the former plan was taken to stop the provision for the vessels as well as other matters; and he is only induced to depart from this idea in...
Lt. Whitehead undertakes to go tomorrow morning early with some important dispatches for The General to Philadelphia. You will be pleased to have him furnished with a good horse saddle & Bridle for this purpose. ALS , Library of the American Philosophical Society, Philadelphia. Lieutenant James Whitehead, Second Pennsylvania Regiment.
By a letter we have received from General Sullivan it appears that Poor’s Brigade have left their tents behind. The General requests you will have them supplied from your nearest deposit, and, in general, that you will make up every deficiency in this article for the expedition as speedily as possible. General Sullivan appears to be very anxious to have his supplies of every kind forwarded to...
[ West Point, July 27, 1779. Document listed in dealer’s catalogue. Document not found. ] ADS , listed by Thomas F. Madigan, New York City, in Autograph Notes , I (January-February, 1919), 3, Item 203. Greene, a Rhode Island Quaker who served in the state militia in 1774 and 1775, was appointed a brigadier general in the Continental Army on June 22, 1775. After the British evacuated Boston in...
The General requests you will send some discreet person to Brunswick to ascertain the No of Boats in the River. A countryman that is judicious & trusty would give less suspicion than an officer. It should if possible be a person acquainted with the place. His inquiries will be the more easily accepted. The more hurry & dispatch the better. DS   Yr obt Serv JCH Transcripts John C. Hamilton...