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[ Pawlins Mill, Pennsylvania ] October 8, 1777 . Orders Greene’s regiment and that of Colonel Israel Angell to Red Bank as a special detachment with Greene in command. Df , in writing of H, George Washington Papers, Library of Congress. H dated this letter October 7 at the beginning and October 8 at the end. Greene was a colonel, First Rhode Island Regiment.
I have directed General Varnum to send your regiment and that of Colonel Angel to Red bank, by a rout which has been marked out to him. The command of that detachment will of course devolve upon you; with which you will proceed with all expedition and throw your self into that place. When you arrive there you will immediately communicate your arrival to Col: Smith, commander of the Garrison at...
I have recd some accounts from Jersey which makes it unneccessary to send more than one Regiment there at present. You will therefore proceed to Red Bank with your own with all dispatch and send Colo. Angells back to Join General Varnum. I am &ca Df , in Tench Tilghman’s writing, DLC:GW ; Varick transcript , DLC:GW .
[ Towamencin, Pennsylvania ] October 14, 1777 . Orders Greene to send sufficient men to replace deserters in Commodore John Hazelwood’s fleet and to assist Lieutenant Colonel Samuel Smith. Df , in writing of H, George Washington Papers, Library of Congress.
Commodore Hazlewood informs me that the desertions from the fleet have left him exceedingly deficient in men, which must greatly enfeeble his operations. As I imagine there is likely to be a number of men accustomed to the water in your garrison, I must desire you will immediately draft all such and deliver them for the Commodore, for the use of the fleet. It is essential he should have a...
His Excellency is persuaded by intelligence from different Quarters that the Enemy are determin’d to endeavour, by a speedy & vigorous effort to carry Fort Mifflin, and for this purpose are preparing a considerable force. Their attempt will probably be sudden & violent as they are hardly in a situation to delay a matter so essential to them as that of removing the River obstructions. It is of...
Sir: I am persuaded by intelligence from different quarters, that the enemy are determined to endeavour by a speedy and vigorous effort to carry Fort Mifflin, and for this purpose are preparing a considerable force. Their attempt will probably be sudden and violent, as they are hardly in a situation to delay a matter so essential to them as that of removing the River obstructions. It is of...
[ Worcester, Pennsylvania ] October 18, 1777 . Informs Greene that Baron d’Arendt will assume command of Fort Mifflin and that Lieutenant Colonel John Green, with reinforcements, is on the way to the fort. Sends news of surrender of General John Burgoyne. Df , in writing of Richard Kidder Meade, last sentence in writing of H, George Washington Papers, Library of Congress.
Lt Colo. Green marched this morning to reinforce the Garrison at Fort Mifflin, with a detachment of Two hundred Men, & Colo. Arendt will immediately set out to take the Command of that Fort. When the Garrison was first sent to that Post, this Gentn was appointed to take the Command of it, but an indisposition with which he was seized prevented his entering upon it before. He is now recover’d,...
[ Whitpain Township, Pennsylvania ] October 24, 1777 . Congratulates Greene on defeat of enemy on October 22, 1777, and orders that all prisoners be sent to Morristown. Df , in writing of H, George Washington Papers, Library of Congress.
I have just received a letter from Major Ward written by your desires giving an account of your success over the enemy on the 22d instant. I heartily congratulate you upon this happy event, and beg you will accept my most particular thanks and present the same to your whole garrison both officers and men. Assure them that their gallantry and good behaviour meet my warmest approbation. All the...
I have sent down Lt Colo. Rollston with three hundred pennsylvania Militia to reinforce Forts Mercer and Mifflin. I therefore desire that you and Baron Arent will settle the proportion that each is to have upon the most equitable terms. If you should have been joined by such a Number of Jersey Militia as will render your post quite secure, you are to permit all the pennsylvania Militia to pass...
I am led to believe from the conversation I have had with Lieut. Colo. Green, that you have made Fort Mercer impregnable against an assault, and that nothing is to be feared but from regular approaches, and Shells. to guard against the first, it will be found necessary to have some out works, which time may, possibly, allow you to raise. to secure the Garrison against the second, some Bomb...
West Point, July 30, 1779. Answers questions concerning arrangement of Greene’s regiment and provisions made for Captain Thomas Arnold. Df , in writing of H, George Washington Papers, Library of Congress.
A variety of indispensible business has hitherto suspended my answer to your letter of the 7th of May. With respect to the arrangement you propose for your regiment, the matter had been previously determined on the former arrangement and the commissions issued by the board of war. Though I should be happy to do every thing in my power for the relief of a deserving and unfortunate officer; yet...
I am to request that you will transmit me as soon as possible an exact Return of the number of non Commd Officers and privates of your Regiment designating in a particular manner what proportion of them are inlisted for the War and the different terms of service of the residue digested in monthly Columns. You cannot be too expeditious in forwarding me this Return—a duplicate of which you will...
Be pleased immediately upon the Receipt hereof to set your Regiment to work in making Fascines. They are to be from 12 to 18 feet in length and 10 Inches thick, well bound, and cut square at both ends— of these kinds, they may make as many as they can ’till further orders, and a few hundreds 6 feet long and 15 Inches thick.—a number of split stakes of hard Wood will also be necessary to fix...
I recd your favr of the 9th Inst inclosing the proceedings of a Court Martial upon Fry of your Regt. I have approved the sentence, and inclosed you have a Warrant for his Execution. I think it more than probable that your Regiment will be in a little time drawn to the main Body of the Army, should it not, means must be fallen upon to provide you pay and other necessaries upon the spot. I am...
I have received your favr of the 14th. I had determined not to march the Levies, attached to your Regiment, to the Army, as their term of service was so nearly expired, and as Count Rochambeau expressed a wish that the Regiment might remain with him, I assured him that it should not be ordered away while he thought it of any service to him. Your stay will therefore depend upon circumstances....
I have recd your favr of the 27th ulto—As I have been informed that the State agreed to allow the Levies higher pay than the Continental Troops, I imagine they will take measures to satisfy them at the end of their service, charging the Continent with the usual monthly allowance. The pay of the Army is in arrears since march last—The treasury is making every exertion to procure Money from the...
[ Preakness, New Jersey ] November 27, 1780 . Asks Greene, if ordered to West Point by Comte de Rochambeau, to take only men who will remain in service under new arrangement of Army. LS , in writing of H, George Washington Photostats, Library of Congress.
It is probable you will receive The Count De Rochambeau’s orders to march, with your regiment to West Point. Should this be the case, you will only come on with such officers as are to remain in service, on the new-arrangement and such men as are engaged for the war, or at least for a term, that will last through the next campaign. The other men you may dismiss, unless The Count De Rochambeau...
The diminution of our force, by the discharge of the Levies, obliges me to call in all continental detachments of the Army not absolutely necessary, at remote posts — You will therefore immediately, upon the receipt of this, march with your Regiment, and any new Recruits which may have joined, to that part of the Army which lays in the neighbourhood of Peekskill, and with which you will be...