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Documents filtered by: Recipient="Girardin, Louis Hue"
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The bearer hereof, T. Jefferson Randolph , my grandson, proceeds to Richmond with a view to enter as a student in the academy at that place under your care. having been taught Latin & French (the former however not as perfectly as should be) he passed a year at Philadelphia , attending courses of lectures in Botany, Natural history, Anatomy & Surgery. our object in sending him to your academy...
Th: Jefferson must apologise to mr Girardin for not sending an answer to his note of the day before yesterday , which was occasioned by his servant’s departure while he was writing it. he now sends him Jones ’s MS. and Mellish ’s travells. the copy of the British spy which he possesses belongs to his petit format library in Bedford , where it now is. he will with pleas has made a few...
When it was determined in March last that the whole of the funds of the University, which could be commanded during the present year, should be applied to the preparation of accomodations for the reception of professors and students, the friends of the institution thought it very important that a classical school, in the mean time, should be established at Charlottesville, for the preparation...
I return the three Cahiers, which I have perused with the usual satisfaction. you will find a few pencilled notes, merely verbal. But in one place I have taken a greater liberty than I ever took before, or ever indeed had occasion to take. it is in the case of Josiah Philips , which I find strangely represented by judge Tucker and mr Edmund Randolph , and very negligently vindicated by mr...
I return you the 15 th 16 th and 17 th chapters which I have kept too long; but since mr Millegan ’s arrival I have scarcely had a moment at command. I have made a few verbal alterations only as usual, except in the 15 th where I suggest an alteration giving a more precise explanation of the transaction it relates to than your text had done. but I observe an omission of one of the most...
I return your cahier, without with about half a dozen unimportant alterations only. three or four of these are foreignisms (if I may coin a word where the language gives none) indeed I have wondered that you could have so perfectly have possessed yourself of the idiom and spirit of the English language, as not to write it correctly merely, but so often elegantly. permit me to suggest a single...
I thank you for the gazettes, review, & Coote s’s history , all of which I have read, except the last, which I have sufficiently examined to see that it is valuable as a repertory only, without any particular merit. on your mention of Mellish ’s opinion of the tenets which distinguish the two political parties of this country, I recollected I had written him a letter on the subject of that...
Th: Jefferson returns to mr Girardin the Prospectus of his work to which he becomes willingly a subscriber. his plan will enable him to embrace objects and circumstances certainly very interesting to the American reader, and the Prospectus itself evidences that the work will be well executed. he presents to mr Girardin his salutations & respects. MHi : Coolidge Collection.
Your letter of the 6 th came but lately to hand. I cheerfully comply with the request it conveyed of writing to the President on the subject of the Librarian’s office. I accordingly inclose a letter to him, stating truths to which I bear witness ever with pleasure; & I shall be the happier if the position should befriend the publication of the rest of your history. Our University is going on...
Th: Jefferson presents his compliments to mr Girardin and informs him that he has with great pleasure written the letter to mr Chandson which was desired, and has sent it to himself by mail directly, and he salutes mr Girardin with friendship and respect. PPAmP : Thomas Jefferson Letters.