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Middlebrook [ New Jersey ] May 1, 1779 . Suggests two plans for cooperation of French fleet and American troops. Df , in writing of H, George Washington Papers, Library of Congress.
Copy: Library of Congress I enclose the Letters for M. Beyerlé. But as by the Note concerning him it seems he has Expectations of being employ’d in our Army, I cannot but be sorry that he should undertake so expensive & hazardous a Voyage with those Views, being persuaded that he will not find such Employment. I am expressly charged not to encourage officers to go over, and therefore can give...
ALS : Archives du Ministère des affaires étrangères; copy: Harvard University Library Being desirous of a conference with you on a subject, that appears to us of importance; we shall be glad to meet you here, or at Versailles, as soon as may be convenient to you. We have the honor to be, with the greatest respect, Sir, Your most Obedient and most Humble Servants Notation: 1778. Mars 4. Both...
Copy: Library of Congress I congratulate you most Sincerely on your safe arrival after so many fatigues and Perils and on your happy Meeting with your family and friends. I long to embrace and Welcome you in Person but have been prevented, partly by an unwillingness to intrude on Those first hours, which you might wish to Spend with your nearer Connections, and Partly by Accidental Business....
A report prevails here that Your Excellency intends shortly to take your departure for France. On a presumption of its truth, I take the liberty to request you will do me the Honor to take charge of the inclosed letter for the Marquis De la Fayette. I cannot but avail myself of this opportunity of assuring your Excellency of the high sense I entertain of your services to this country, and how...
The obligation I felt for the visit which Your Excellency did me the honor to make me could only be increased by the manner in which you are pleased to mention the reception you met with. If there was any thing that deserved to give you pleasure, it was the sentiments which accompanied the marks of respect we were happy to have an opportunity of showing you. As the Minister of a Prince we...
The Baron de Kalb did me the honor some days ago to communicate a letter he had received from your Excellency which flattered us with the hopes of seeing you at the Army before your departure for France. I am since told by the Baron that you have changed your intention of coming this way. In this I feel myself deprived of a great pleasure—I cannot however permit you to leave these States...
Col. Fleury having signified to me his intention of shortly returning to France and requested permission to go to Philadelphia to make some arrangements for this purpose on which his final determination will depend; I take the liberty to give him this letter to Your Excellency as a testimony of the sense I entertain of his conduct and services in this country, which have been such as to merit...
As you have been pleas’d to honor me with a communication of His Excellency Count D’Estang’s intention of returning to this Continent with the Squadron under his command, and have desired to know my sentiments of the manner in which this event may be best improved for the interest of the common cause—and what can be done on the part of these States towards that end—I beg leave to offer the...
The General Assembly of Virginia at their first Session which was held after the conclusion of the Treaties of Alliance and Commerce between his most Christian Majesty and the American Congress, tho’ seeing that fortunate event in all its importance, yet omitted to give it their particular approbation, entertaining a daily hope that the Confederation of the united States would be acceded to by...