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Letter not found: to Benjamin Franklin, 23 July 1756. On 19 Aug. 1756 Franklin wrote to GW: “I have your Favours of July 23. and Aug. 3.”
Letter not found: to Benjamin Franklin, 3 Aug. 1756. On 19 Aug. 1756 Franklin wrote to GW: “I have your Favours of July 23. and Aug. 3.”
AL : American Philosophical Society I do myself the pleasure to Transmit you the Inclosed Letter, which I received yesterday with several others in the condition this is, and containing similar Intelligence; the rest I forwarded to Congress immediately on receipt. They had passed thro the hands of some of the Committees in the Eastern Governments by whom they were opened. On the morning of the...
I do myself the pleasure to Transmit you the Inclosed Letter, which I received yesterday with several others in the condition this is, & containing similar Intelligence—the rest I forwarded to Congress immediately on receipt. they had passed thro the hands of some of the Committees in the Eastern Governments by whom they were opened. On the morning of the 17 Inst. with much concern and...
The Inclosed Letter is the one I ask’d you in Philadelphia if you had received. It has undergone another Inspection, as you will find by the Letter which covers it. I hope, tho late, in the third tryal it will get safe, & without accident, to hand. with very great respt and esteem I remain—Dr Sir Yr Most Obedt Hble Servt ALS , owned (1972) by IRoC ; sold by Sotheby Parke Bernet, 13 May 1987....
Within these few days I have been favour’d with two Letters from you—the first cover’d one to Lord Howe which with equal confidence I should have sent locked under a Seal—the only difference is, that I have had an oppertunity of perusing Sentiments which cannot but be admired—the Second, recommending the scheme of to whom I have given every aid in my power to bring his project to maturity....
ALS : American Philosophical Society I have been honourd with your favour of the 16th., and the several Inclosures contained therein, which are now return’d with my thanks for the oppertunity of perusing them. I also Inclose you a Letter from Lord Howe, sent out (with others) by a Flag in the Afternoon of yesterday. With it comes a Letter for Lieutt. Barrington, who if not among those who...
I have been honourd with your favour of the 16th, and the several Inclosures contained therein, which are now return’d with my thanks for the oppertunity of perusing them —I also Inclose you a Letter from Lord Howe, sent out (with others) by a Flag in the Afternoon of yesterday. with it comes a Letter for Lieutt Barrington, who if not among those who broke their Parole, & went of for Canada,...
[ Camp at Cross Roads, Pennsylvania ] August 17, 1777. Acknowledges receipt of Turgot’s recommendation for a French volunteer. Discusses difficulty of placing French officers and advises Franklin to discourage potential candidates in France. Df , in writing of H, George Washington Papers, Library of Congress. Franklin was in France serving as United States Commissioner to that country. Anne...
Draft: Library of Congress I have been honord with your favour of the 2d. April by Monsieur De Cenis written on behalf of that Gentleman on the credit of Monsr. Turgot’s recommendation. I should have been happy had it been in my power, in deference to your recommendation, founded upon that of so respectable a character as Monsr. Turgot, to afford Mr. De Cenis the encouragement, his zeal and...
I have been honord with your favour of the 2d April by Monsieur De Cenis written in behalf of that Gentleman on the credit of Monsr Turgot’s recommendation. I should have been happy had it been in my power, in deference to your recommendation, founded upon that of so respectable a character as Monsr Turgot, to afford Mr De Cenis the encouragement, his zeal and trouble in coming to America to...
ALS : Private collection (1988); draft and two copies: Library of Congress The Marquis de la fayette having served with distinction as Major General in the Army of the United States, two Campaigns—has been determined by the prospect of an European War to return to his native Country. It is with pleasure that I embrace the oppertunity of introducing to your personal acquaintance a Gentln whose...
The Marquis de la fayette having served with distinction as Major General in the army of the United States, two Campaigns—has been determined by the prospect of an European War to return to his native Country. It is with pleasure that I embrace the oppertunity of introducing to your personal acquaintance a Gentn whose merit cannot have left him unknown to you by reputation. The generous...
ALS : American Philosophical Society; copy: Library of Congress This letter will be delivered to you by Mr. Mason, son to George Mason Esqr. of Virginia, a Gentn. of fortune and influence in that state—a zealous & able supporter of the liberties of this Country—and a particular friend of mine. The young Gentlemans bad health induces him to try some other clime, probably the air of Montpelier,...
This letter will be delivered to you by Mr Mason, Son to George Mason Esqr. of Virginia, a Gentn of fortune and influence in that State—a zealous & able Supporter of the liberties of this Country—and a particular friend of mine. The young Gentlemans bad health induces him to try some other clime, probably the Air of Montpelier, while inclination may lead him to Paris, in which case, I take the...
Bergen County [ New Jersey ] October 9, 1780 . States that the idea of a tour of Europe with Franklin after the war would be tempting if domestic affairs were not so urgent. Asserts that the American military and political situation is such that the country can only be saved by either peace or money from America’s allies. Df , in writing of H, George Washington Papers, Library of Congress.
ALS : New Jersey Historical Society; draft: Library of Congress I was very much obliged by the letter which you did me the honor to write me by our amiable young friend the Marquis De La Fayette, whose exertions to serve this Country in his own are additional proofs of his zealous attachment to our cause, and has endeared him to us still more. He came out flushed with expectations of a...
I was very much obliged by the letter which you did me the honor to write me by our amiable young friend the Marquis De La Fayette, whose exertions to serve this Country in his own are additional proofs of his zealous attachment to our cause, and has endeared him to us still more. He came out flushed with expectations of a decisive campaign and fired with hopes of acquiring fresh laurels, but...
ALS : American Philosophical Society; AL (draft): Library of Congress A few days since—by the Chevr. De Chatteleaux I had the honor to receive your favor of the 19th. of March introductory of him, and thank you for bringing me acquainted with a Gentleman of his merit, knowledge, and agreeable manners.— I spent several days very happily with him at our Camp near the Great Falls of Passaic in...
A few days since—by the Chevr De Chatteleaux I had the honor to receive your favor of the 19th of March introductory of him, and thank you for bringing me acquainted with a Gentleman of his merit, knowledge, and agreeable manners. I spent several days very happily with him at our Camp near the Great Falls of Passaic in New Jersey before the Army removed to its places of Cantonment the...
New Windsor [ New York ] January 15, 1781 . Introduces and commends Lieutenant Lieutenant Colonel John Laurens. Explains reasons for sending Laurens to France. Df , in the writing of H, George Washington Papers, Library of Congress.
ALS : Archives du Ministère des affaires étrangères; draft: Library of Congress; copy: American Philosophical Society I have the honor of addressing this letter to you by Colonel Laurens, one of my Aid De Camps, whom Congress has been pleased to Commission for particular purposes to the Court of Versailles.— Justice to the character of this Gentleman conspiring with motives of friendship will...
I have the honour of addressing this Letter to you by Colonel Laurens, one of my Aide De Camps, whom Congress has been pleased to Commission for particular purposes to the Court of Versailles. justice to the character of this Gentleman conspiring with motives of friendship will not permit me to let him depart without testifying to you the high opinion I entertain of his worth, as a Citizen and...
L (draft): Library of Congress; copies: Library of Congress, National Archives; transcript: National Archives As the transmission of the inclosed paper thru the usual channel of the department of foreign affairs, would on the present occasion probably be attended with great delay—and recent intelligence of Mility [military] Transactions must be important to our Ministers in Europe at the...
ALS : American Philosophical Society; LS (draft): Library of Congress I have been honored with two favors of Your Excellency—one presented by the Count de Segur, of the 2d. of April—the other delivered by the Prince de Broglie of the 8th.—both which were rendered doubly agreeable, by the pleasure I had in receiving them from the hands of two such amiable & accomplished Young Gentlemen.—...
I have been honored with two favors of your Excellency—One presented by the Count de Segur of the 2d of April—the other delivered by the Prince de Broglio, of the 8th—both wch were rendered doubly agreeable, by the pleasure I had in receiving them from the hands of two such amiable young Gentlemen. Independent of my esteem for your Excellency—be assured Sir! that my respect & regard for the...
ALS : reproduced in Lion Heart Autographs, Catalogue No. 22 (1991), item 98; draft and transcript: Library of Congress The Credentials with which Mr. Wheelock is furnished are so ample, and so fully set forth the benevolent purposes of the Institution over which he presides, that I am confident nothing more is necessary for me, than barely to introduce him to you and to recommend him to your...
The Credentials with which Mr Wheelock is furnished are so ample, and so fully set for the benevolent purposes of the Institution over which he presides, that I am confident nothing more is necessary for me, than barely to introduce him to you and to recommend him to your Patronage and Friendship—Under them he will be sure to meet with a favorable reception among the Wise and Good. I have the...
Draft: Library of Congress I have the honor to inclose to you, a Letter and Memorial I have just reced from Baron De L’Estrade—an Old Veteran who served with us at the Seige of York—from my acquaintance with this Officer, joined to the general good Character he had—I feel strongly inclined to serve him but there may be many Reasons to render such an interference as he Requests improper—all I...
I have the honor to inclose to you, a Letter and Memorial I have just reced from Baron De L’Estrade—an Old Veteran who served with us at the Seige of York—from my acquaintance with this Officer, joined to the general good Character he had—I feel strongly inclined to serve him but there may be many Reasons to render such an interference as he Requests improper—all I can do therefore is to...
Major Jackson has just informed me of his intention to embark next Week for Europe—Tho’ he has already had the honor to be introduced to you I could not let him depart without expressing my esteem for his character and my wish that he may experience any civilities it may be in your power to shew him. With the most respectful attachment I have the honor to be Yr Excellys Most Obt & Most Hble...
Mr Platt who will have the honor of presenting you this letter, & his Lady are going to England, & probably to France: Should the latter happen, I would beg leave to recommend them to your kind notice & civilities, as respectable citizens of this place. I am, &ca DLC : Papers of George Washington.
Copy: Library of Congress ⟨Philadelphia, December 9, 1783: Dr. Witherspoon, whom you know, is going to Great Britain on business and may possibly travel to France. I recommend him to your civility and attention.⟩ In the hand of GW ’s clerk Tobias Lear. There is no evidence that Witherspoon ever delivered the letter (now missing). John Witherspoon, president of the College of New Jersey, had...
Doct: Witherspoon I believe is known to you, consequently it is unnecessary for me to inform you that he is among the most respectable Citizens we have in the United States. Business carries him to Gt Britain, & business or inclination may possibly lead him to France—in which case I persuade myself he will partake of those Civilities and attentions, which you bestow so liberally upon every...
ALS : University of Pennsylvania Library; copy: Library of Congress Mr. Tracy the bearer of this, is a Gentleman of Fortune from Massachusettsbay—on a visit to Europe. His political character, and character for benevolence & hospitality are too well established in this Country to need any other recommendation, notwithstanding I have taken the liberty of giving him this letter of introduction...
Mr Tracy the bearer of this, is a Gentleman of Fortune from Massachusettsbay—on a visit to Europe. His political character, and character for benevolence & hospitality are too well established in this Country to need any other recommendation, notwithstanding I have taken the liberty of giving him this letter of introduction to you. With very great esteem and regard—I am—Dr Sir Yr Most Obedt...
ALS : American Philosophical Society; copies: Library of Congress, Bibliothèque Municipale, Nantes Washington here announces that his former aide David Humphreys has been elected by Congress to serve as the secretary of the new commission to negotiate commercial treaties. His election crushed Franklin’s hopes for a diplomatic career for his grandson William Temple Franklin. On August 15 Temple...
Congress having been pleased to appoint Colo. Humphrys Secretary to the Commissioners, for forming Commercial Treaties in Europe, I take the liberty of introducing him to you. This Gentleman was several years in my family as an Aid de Camp. His zeal in the cause of his Country, his good sense, prudence, and attachment to me, rendered him dear to me; and I persuade myself you will find no...
I had just written, & was about to put into the hands of Mr Taylor, (a Gentleman in the Department of the Secretary for foreign Affairs) the enclosed Letter, when I had the honor to receive by Post your favor of the 20th inst. I have a grateful sense of the partiality of the French nation towards me; & feel very sensibly the indulgent expression of your letter which does me great honor. When...
The letter, of which I have the honor to enclose your Excellency an extract, & the Addresses, came to my hands a few days since. Whether the latter are originals or copies, & whether any steps have been taken in compliance with Sir Edwd Newenham’s wishes, you can better decide than I. Also, if there has not, what is best to be done with the application. If I mistake not, this case militates...
On the 3d of Novr I had the honr of addressing your Excelly a letter, of which the enclosed is a copy. Having heard nothing from you since, I am led to apprehend a miscarriage of it, and therefore give you the trouble of a duplicate: not knowing what reply to make to Sir Edward Newe[n]ham, or what more to do in this business untill I am favoured with your answer. With the greatest respect &...
The affectionate congratulations on the recovery of my health—and the warm expressions of personal friendship which were contained in your favor of the 16th instt, claim my gratitude. And the consideration that it was written when you were afflicted with a painful malady, greatly increases my obligation for it. Would to God, my dear Sir, that I could congratulate you upon the removal of that...