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Documents filtered by: Recipient="Estaing, Charles-Hector Théodat, comte d’"
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I this moment received the Letter which you did me the honor of writing by Lt Colo. Hamilton. I cannot forbear regretting that the brilliant enterprize which you at first meditated, was frustrated by Physical imposibilities—but hope that something equally worthy of the greatness of your sentiments is still in reserve for you. Upon the report made me by Lt Colo. Laurens of the depth of Water at...
Letter not found : to Vice Admiral d’Estaing, c.18 July 1778. On 26 July, GW wrote d’Estaing : “I had the honor of writing you the inclosed Letter from Haverstraw Bay, which was intended to introduce Colonel Sears to your notice. This Gentlemen set out with Captain Dobbs.”
I had the honor of writing to Your Excellency yesterday from Fort Clinton —since which I have received intelligence by a New York paper that Admiral Byron in the princess Royal of ninety guns—accompanied by the Culloden Capt. Balfour of seventy four, arrived at New York on the 16th instant. the same paper mentions that an armed Sloop from Hallifax announces the arrival of the following...
On receiving advice that your Excellency had been seen in a latitude, which indicated your approach to our Coasts, and supposing it possible you might direct your course this way, I did myself the honor to write you a Letter on the 13th of September and stationed an Officer in Monmouth County to meet you with it, on your arrival at the Hook. In that Letter I explained the situation and force...
I had the honor of writing you the inclosed Letter from Haverstraw Bay, which was intended to introduce Colonel Sears to your notice. This Gentlemen set out with Captain Dobbs, a pilot, of the first established reputation, to offer their services to the Squadron under your command. Before they had an opportunity of reaching the Fleet, they sailed from the Road off Sandy Hook. Colo. Sears is...
Since my Letter to Your Excellency on the 4th instant, I have had the honor of a visit from His Excellency Monsieur Gerard. In the conversation we had relative to a co-operation with the Fleet and troops under your command—he expressed his doubts of its being possible for you to continue such a length of time as may be essential to the success of the undertaking, and which alone could justify...
Your Excelly I am sure will pardon me, when the momentary interruption I give you, is for the purpose of introducing to your Civilities Monsr Gouvion, Colo. in the American Service, and an Officer of great merit, & of distinguished zeal, abilities & bravery. He will repeat to you my former assurances of attachment—& convey to you my present wishes for your Success—He will tell you how happy it...
I had the honor of transmitting to Your Excellency on the 18th instant, some advices which appeared to me very interesting—An intelligent Officer stationed at a proper place for observing the enemys naval movements, in his last report, says—“On the 16th October about twelve Ships fell down to the hook—early on the morning of the 17th about one hundred Ships and Transports exclusive of Sloops...
I cannot my dear General express to you all the gratitude which I feel for your very great politeness manifested for me in your letter of the 25th of Decr—which I now have the honor & pleasure to acknowledge. The very tender & friendly regards which you are pleased to mention as possessing your mind, for my person & character, have affected me with the deepest sensibility; & will be forever...
I embrace with pleasure an opportunity, of introducing to Your Excellencys acquaintance, Brigadier General Du portail, an Officer of your nation whose talents and services have rendered him valuable to ours. The important post of chief engineer and the elevated grade which he holds in our army, are proofs of the confidence which Congress places in him—the distinguished manner in which he has...