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As it gives room for federal clamour for me ever to say any thing about an election, what I am now to say is confidential. Genl. Mason arrived here yesterday. I spoke to him on the subject of the resignation which he had meditated. he expressed great anxiety to withdraw, but finally said that if re-elected he would serve again. you can therefore affirm as a thing known to you through a single...
Yesterday morning I recieved information of Maria’s safe arrival at Edgehill. some apprehension that Francis had recieved the infection of the measles on the road had determined her to await there the usual term of it’s appearance. I have to acknolege several letters from you . Colo. Monroe arrived here the night before last, not having previously heard of his appointment to Paris & Madrid to...
Your’s of the 10th. was recieved on the 16th. I shall leave this about the 6th. of March, unless unexpected business, bad roads or bad weather should delay it a little. I am happy to learn that I shall meet Maria & yourself at Monticello. my stay there will be of two or three weeks, the visit being for the purpose of planting trees, in order that they may be growing during my absence. as Lilly...
Your’s of the 14th. came to hand last night, and I am glad it was written before mine of the 13th. could have been recieved, because that might have delayed the expression of your convenience. the 400. D. shall be remitted to G. Jefferson the first week in May for you. I remit it there because it appears that the conveyance by post between that place & you is too tardy & unsafe to be relied...
Your’s of the 6th. is recieved. I have not yet heard any thing from mr Hancocke respecting the syrup of punch.   I remit monies to G. Jefferson by this post, out of which he will answer the 400 D. for which I now inclose you an order. If the proposition you make of the exchange of the lands in Bedford for Lego, involved no further consequence, the difficulties would be lessened. but a...
Yours of the 14th. came to hand last night. I am glad you are all well so far, but having terrible apprehensions of the Hundred after the warm weather sets in, I should have been better pleased to learn you would go to Monticello immediately from whence you could make your trip to the Louisa springs if necessary at your convenience. groceries & other necessaries for summer use at Monticello...
Your letter of the 9th. has at length relieved my spirits. still the debility of Maria will need attention, lest a recurrence of fever should degenerate into Typhus. I should suppose the system of wine & food as effectual to prevent as to cure that fever, and think she should use both as freely as she finds she can bear them. light food & cordial wines. the Sherry at Monticello is old &...
I should much sooner have written to you but for the press of business which had accumulated at my return, and which is not yet entirely got under. we lamented much that you had not staid a day longer at Monticello, as on the evening of your departure the Eppington family arrived, and it would have added much to our happiness to have been all together the 4. or 5. days that the weather...
Your letters of July 16. & 29. both came to me on the 2d instant . I recieve with great delight the information of the perfect health of our dear infants, and hope to see yourself, the family, and them, as soon as circumstances admit. with respect to Melinda I have too many already to leave here in idleness when I go away; and at Washington I prefer white servants, who, when they misbehave,...
Yours of the 22d. by Martin is recieved together with the horse. in the exchange we have made my own knolege of the horse recived is sufficient to prevent all after-claims as to his soundness, should he become unsound. so frequently the lot of horses the loss must be mine, without affecting you. With respect to the land at Poplar forest you are free to enter into occupation of it when you...
Not understanding the conveyance to you by post beyond Richmond, I have thought it safest to remit the 100. D. for you to Gibson & Jefferson, subject to your order, which is done this day. I was never better pleased with a riding horse than with Jacobin. it is now really a luxury to me to ride.   The early prevalence of sickness here this season will probably drive us hence earlier than usual,...
Yours of the 16th. was recieved the day before yesterday; and altho’ I do not foresee a conveyance of the present, yet I write it to be ready for any one which shall occur. my intentions of having the levelling done at Pantops have continued, because till that is done, no planting of trees or other improvement, could be undertaken. I am now engaged in levelling my own garden. I have fewer...
[unfavorable change in appearances there, unless we consider as such a procrastination which may be fairly ascribed to other causes. We find from our last information that we shall have one of the finest roads in the world from Athens to Fort Stoddert, which is within 180 miles of New Orleans. This last distance will admit a good road but an expensive one. All the stuff you see in the papers...
On reciept of your letter I sent Joseph into the country to enquire into the situation of the mare. he reported that the people there thought she had a month to go; he thought less, because he observed her bag enlarged. mr Randolph recovers strength remarkeably slow, & I am now in the 8th day of periodical head-ach which threatens to be obstinate. I question if we get from here under a...
Martin arrived here the night before last & delivered safely yours of the 22d. I learn with great pleasure the good health of yourself & the good family of Eppington & particularly of our dear Francis. I have little fear but that he will out grow those attacks which have given us such frequent uneasiness. I shall hope to see him well here next winter & that our grounds will be in such a state...
I have lost two days ago the most valuable horse I had remaining (Turn-coat). a constipation of the bowels which nothing could remove carried him off in 24. hours. I am now reduced to 2. carriage horses, Castor & Fitzpartner; they are old & do not match. I can not get along without another, & therefore must pray you to get me one to match Castor. a perfect match I cannot expect, but if he is...
Yours of the 3d. is recieved. at that time I presume you had not got mine of June 19. asking the favor of you to procure me a horse. I have lost three since you left this place. however I can get along with the three I have remaining so as to give time for looking up a fourth suitable in as many points as can be obtained. my happiness at Monticello (if I am able to go there) will be lessened...
Your two letters of Aug. 9. & Sep. 21. were duly recieved: and altho’, according to the latter I may expect your servant tomorrow, if you succeed in the purchase of the horse, yet as mr Coles is now here & proposes to go by the way of Eppington I think it surest to answer by him. I have had your table, copying press & bust well packed in a box, and as I am sure it would be agreeable to mrs...
After the inclosed was written & delivered to mr Coles, your servant arrived; I therefore send it by him instead of mr Coles. the purchase of the horse may lie till we meet in Washington as I shall not be in want of one during the winter. the two boxes with the harpsichord, table Etc were sent to mr Higginbotham yesterday to be forwarded by the boats to Gibson & Jefferson. a rod belonging to...
In my letter to you from Monticello by your servant I had concluded to let the purchase of the horse lie till you should come here. but I find I am obliged to get another & without much delay: & that therefore I had better not let the chance slip out of my hands of getting Major Egglestone’s horse, for taking into consideration his price, & the circumstance of it’s being known that he draws...
In revising my philosophical apparatus I find I have some articles to spare which will be of use to Francis when he comes to that part of his education, and may in the mean time amuse yourself. these are Martin’s portable air pump & apparatus by Dollond an Hydrostatic balance by Dollond a Solar microscope in brass, with Wilson’s pocket apparatus by Dollond a best barometer. a Camera obscura,...
Your letter of the 5th. mentioning that you should be at Eppington till the 14th. & then proceed to Cumberland did not get here till the 15th. it had either been put into the post-office at Richmond after the mail hour, or loitered there a week. I thank you for your attention to the purchase of a horse. I now send for him, & the bearer goes first to Cumberland, & if yourself or the horse...
I recieved some time ago a summons from Commissioner Ladd to attend a settlement in the case of m r Wayles & mr Skelton ’s accounts on the 1 st of Aug. I expressed to him, in answer, my extreme anxiety to have that settlement made, & that I would attend any meeting which promised to be effectual; that I doubted whether in the sickly season an effectual meeting could be had at Richmond , &...
I should sooner have informed you of Francis’s safe arrival here but that the trip you meditated to N. Carolina rendered it entirely uncertain where a letter would find you. nor had I any expectation you could have been at the first meeting of Congress till I saw your name in the papers brought by our last post. disappointed in sending this by the return of the post, I avail myself of General...
Our letters crossing each other on the road have anticipated the grounds of mutual excuse for their being the first which were written. my occupations are now almost entirely without doors, in the farms the garden, the shops E t c. I shut up my room on going to breakfast & scarcely enter it again but to dress for dinner, after which I read little, & never write. this of course withdraws me...
Your’s of the 10 th came safely to hand, and I now inclose you a letter from Francis . he continues in excellent health, and employs his time well. he has written to his Mama & grandmama . I observe that the H. of R. are sensible of the ill effect of the long speeches in their house on their proceedings. but they have a worse effect in the disgust they excite among the people, and the...
Your letter of the 21 st brought to my mind Col o Bentley’s business. I immediately examined the papers, & calculated the balance due, a small one, and wrote to mr James Pleasants a statement of the account, authorising him on paiment of the balance to Gibson & Jefferson in Richmond , to convey the lands to Col o Bentley discharged of all further claims on my part. Francis
I found here your letter of the 2 d on my return from a three weeks visit to Bedford : and as I see by a resolution of Congress that they are to adjourn on the 23 d I shall direct the present to Eppington where it may meet you on your passage to Carolina . mr Thweatt is to let me know when I am to set out for
M r Thweatt’s letter with your P.S. came to hand late last night, and I shall dispatch Francis tomorrow morning in the care of one of the most trusty servants I have. it will take to-day to have Francis’s affairs ready for the road, & he will be obliged to make but two days of the journey to arrive at Eppington on the eve of your departure for Carolina . considering the shortness of the time...
I recieved in May last the inclosed letter from mr Thomas Wilson agent for Speirs & co. with two other papers the copy of which is now inclosed, the originals being returned to him at his request. I wrote in answer that your father had solely gone through the administration of mr Wayles’s estate, or had left so little to do that I expected you would do that, as the papers were in your hands,...