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The letter which you were so kind as to write to me the 22d. of May 1786. was not delivered to me till the 3d. of May 1787. when it found me in the neighborhood of Marseilles. Before that time you must have taken your degree as mentioned in your letter. Those public testimonies which are earned by merit and not by sollicitation may always be accepted without the imputation of vanity. Of this...
Your departure hence is so recent that nothing has occurred worth communicating to you. The object of the present letter is merely to inclose to you an account presented me by Peter Gordon the shoemaker, who supposed you had forgotten him. As I know that there is sometimes a forgetfulness on the side of the Creditor, I told him I would pay the account if you should admit it to be just. You...
I have just received from Donald & Burton the invoice of your books . Thinking you would be impatient to hear something of them, I inclose you the invoice . They have been shipped from Dublin on board the Young eagle, Elias Lord. The four last in the invoice came here under the care of Mr. Marshal, who told me he would have them delivered to me as soon as they could be come at in the ship....
I find on recurring to the papers that the name of the person for whose tobacco I am charged was Thomas Cobbs . The year does not appear: but it must have been 1785. or 1786. Nor does the warehouse appear.—Mr. Giles joined us, the day after you left us, and after a stay of a week or 10 days he went on to the springs, from whence he will return with Mr. Randolph. A letter from Mr. Randolph 2...
Presuming that you get the newspapers I shall not repeat the public news which they detail. The great victory obtained by the English over the Dutch fleet is placed beyond doubt, they have taken 9 out of 16. As to the proceedings of Congress, they have passed a bill putting off the commencement of the Stamp act till July next. The land tax will not be taken up this session. It is suspected...
I wrote you last on the 1st. inst. and three days ago recieved Maria’s of the same date. we have intelligence which seems to be authentic that the Spaniards have delivered up the posts on the Missisipi. this is the more welcome, as the commencement of war in that quarter seemed more imminent than it is with France. we are certainly more indebted for avoiding it to the good sense & moderation...
My last letter from Maria was of Mar. 20. & from yourself of Feb. 8 . the dates of my latest to Maria were of Apr. 1. Mar. 7. and to yourself of Feb. 18. you have seen in the papers the resolutions proposed by mr Sprigg, the first of which was that under existing circumstances it is not expedient to resort to war with France. it is very uncertain how this would have been decided. but the...
I wrote you last on the 11th. of April, & the day after recieved yours of Apr. 4 . I inclosed you at the same time the communications just then recieved from our envoys. others are lately recieved, but, as far as made known to us, they contain only a long memorial given in by them, justifying all our complaints , and repelling those of France. it takes up the subject from the time of Genet’s...
I wrote to my dear Maria on the 1st. inst. and covered it in one to yourself on the 3d . I have not yet recieved any letters either from you or Monticello since I left home, now five weeks.—you will have seen the debates on Logan’s law, as it is called. the forged paper they endeavored to palm on the H. of R. as if written & presented by Logan to the French directory, being made appear to have...
Yours of Jan. 20. & 24. are duly recieved. in the former you mention the reciept of £40. for me, and Maria’s of the next day says that mr Eppes expected to recieve £30. more for me at the ensuing Cumberland court. not having heard from mr Randolph on the subject of the hire of your negroes, I was in the moment of recieving your letter, just about to inclose you a draught on George Jefferson...
We have for some time past had as little communication almost as if we did not know how to write. mr Randolph’s journies have given us mutual information of the welfare of both families & of course has lessened the occasion for writing. your prospect of a crop here has been as good as could be, independant of the seasons. but there has been through the whole of this part of the country an...
I recieved yesterday a letter from Doctr. Taylor informing me he had paid very nearly the whole sum he owed me to mr Hanson, whose certificate was in the hands of French on it’s way to me. as soon as I recieve this certificate I shall not hesitate to redeliver to him the patents of the mortgaged lands in Greenbriar &c. be so good therefore as to leave them with mr Eppes, praying him barely to...
Your favor from the Hundred came to hand the [day before] yesterday. I have been detained here a week by bad weather. [this morn]ing mr Nicholas & myself breakfasted at Sun-rise to set out: but heavy snow is now come on. we shall start as soon as it holds up. our election was yesterday. Woods carried it against P. Carr by 247. against 122 votes. those of your people who were unwell when you...
Your favor of Jan. 1. came to me on the 18th. that of the 12th. was recieved yesterday . the one you mention from the Hundred has never been recieved. none of these acknolege the receipt of mine of Dec. 21. the day I left Monticello. on the 30th. of Dec. I inclosed you some pamphlets, not writing as you know I mentioned my design of writing little for a year to come. on the 17th. inst. I wrote...
My last was to Maria of the 12th. of Feb. I have been discouraged from writing under the apprehension that my letters did not get to you. I therefore inclosed that to mr Jefferson. since this I have recieved yours of Feb. 7. 10. 16. & 20. by which I have had acknolege ments of the receipt of all mine except of Dec. 21. & my last of Feb. 12. this I shall hear of in due time. the former was sent...
In a letter to Maria, of the 6th. inst. I acknoleged the receipt of yours of Mar. 16. & 24. finding that Patsy has got home, I am in hopes that the expectations expressed in that of the 24th. that Maria would be well in a few days, have been realised; & that this long & painful scene for us all will be closed with a return of health. the two houses have at length agreed to adjourn on the 2d....
I arrived here on the 4th. day of my journey without accident, & found myself better provided with lodgings than I expected. in general Congress is comfortably & conveniently lodged; dearer however than at Philadelphia; in my own case considerably so. the French treaty will meet considerable opposition in Senate. the judiciary system is again brought forward, & there is great fear will...
I wrote to you Dec. 23. via Petersburg, and to Maria Jan. 4. via City point. neither seems to have reached you Jan. 12. the date of your letter which came to hand yesterday. I answer it immediately according to my promise to Maria. and if mine be acknoleged as soon as you recieve it, we may hear from each other regularly every fortnight, as a letter is but 6 days going hence to Richmond, and...
I wrote to Maria on the 15th. inst. yours of the 12th. was recieved on the 18th. mr Tyler who was the bearer of my letter to Maria, set out so instantly after the event of the election that I could not write, but as he had promised to send Maria’s letter, he would probably notify that event at the same time. I cannot regret entirely the disappointment of meeting Maria & yourself at Monticello...
According to the plan I had proposed of each of us answering immediately on reciept of a letter from the other, by which means we should keep up a continued correspondence, & hear mutually about once a fortnight, I was waiting a letter from you, and began to be very uneasy, when yesterday yours of the 18th. came to hand. I set out the last day of this month for Monticello, where I shall remain...
I wrote to you the day before yesterday, since that I have taken a more correct view of my [probable] receipts & expenditures and find that I may venture to take Haxall’s horse immediately at 500. doll. paiable at 90. days. it would be a great inconvenience to have to send from Washington for directions; & on the [other hand] a convenience to have […] brought to Monticello by the messenger who...
I arrived here on the 4th. inst. and found the family at Edgehill all well. we are now all together at this place, and only want the addition of your’s and my dear Maria’s company to be entirely happy. I shall leave it pointedly on the 25th. if not some days before. mr Overton is married & settled adjoining us. Nancy Jefferson is said to be about marrying Charles Lewis. this is our only small...
Martin & Davy arrived on the 20th. with the horses. I am perfectly satisfied with them all, & they completely answer my expectations. they are dear certainly, but horses, less perfect, however cheaper, would not have answered my purpose at all, so that I think the extra prices better submitted to. your draughts will be duly honored & provided for at maturity. the horses being tried in the...
Your favor of the 12th . came to hand this morning, and brings me the always welcome tidings of your’s & Maria’s health. I sincerely wish she had gone to Monticello sooner: but as it is, you must not aim at more than 20. miles a day, nor to go much out of a walk, but in the safest road, for it is the oversetting or breaking down which is to be apprehended, and is less violent in proportion as...
Understanding that you thought of building some time ere long on the upper Pantops, I mentioned to Maria (I do not recollect whether I did to you) that I thought it indispensable that the ground should be first levelled as that of Monticello is, and that if you would be at the trouble of hiring hands, & having the work done, I would pay their hire: and this I recommend to you: desirous of...
I wrote to Maria on the 14th. of Dec. My occupations are now so incessant that I cannot command a moment for my friends. 7. hours of close business in the forepart of the day, and 4. in the evening leave little time for exercise or relaxation. Congress have not yet done anything, nor passed a vote which has produced a party division. the sending a message, instead of making a speech to be...
Yours of the 6th. has been duly recieved. but the printer has been slow in making up for me the documents you desired. they are now inclosed. the Census is not yet printed. the bill for the Military establishment , on the scale proposed by the Executive, passed the H. of R. yesterday by about 58. or 60. votes against 12. a proposition to strike out the Brigadier General had a good deal divided...
My last to you was of the 31st. of Jan. I now inclose you one for Maria. the H. of R. decided the great question on the repeal of the late judiciary bill, the night before last, by 60. against 31. it was yesterday past to the 3d. reading, and I expect it will be finally passed this day. this done, I am in hopes they will press forward the other important matters, as the season is now advancing...
It is now long since I have heard from Maria or yourself. Congress will rise certainly on the 3d. and I shall leave this on the 5th. for Monticello where I shall be one fortnight, and return hither. I mention my movements that if you should be meditating a visit to your plantation about that time we may meet, and at any rate that you may know whither to direct a letter to me. no important...
The family arrived here yesterday morning , without accident. mr Lilly’s order for £40. his wages & £20. for Austin is good. I have lately remitted to John Perry the whole balance due him to the completion of the South East offices; and our bargain is, whenever a compleat job is done & settled it is to be paid for. he says the shop is done, and that it will amount to £60 although he always...