You
have
selected

  • Recipient

    • Dearborn, Henry

Author

Sort: Frequency / Alphabetical

Show: Top 10 / Top 14

Period

Dates From

Dates To

Search help
Documents filtered by: Recipient="Dearborn, Henry"
Results 1-50 of 209 sorted by date (descending)
  • |<
  • <<
  • <
  • Page 1
  • >
  • >>
  • >|
Your favor of May 16. came duly to hand. I had before heard of the accident which had happened to you, on your return from Washington, & could the more feeling ly sympathise with your sufferings, as having some two or three years ago, experienced also the pain of a fractured arm and dislocated wrist, at a more advanced age too when these accidents are slow in recovery. your letter relieved me...
Your letter of Aug. 31. dated so soon after your departure gave me hopes that the sufferings at sea of mrs Dearborne and yourself, if any, had been short. I hope you will both find Lisbon a pleasant residence. I have heard so much of it’s climate that I suppose that alone will go far towards making it so; and should the want of the language of the country lessen the enjoyment of it’s society,...
Your favor of the 8 th came to hand yesterday evening. I hope you will never suppose your letters to be among those which are troublesome to me. they are always welcome, and it is among my great comforts to hear from my antient colleagues, & to know that they are well. the affectionate recollection of mrs Dearborne, cherished by our family, will ever render her health and happiness interesting...
The negociation with mr Stuart has given you much more trouble than I had expected, and more than it should have given had I expected it. however we may now hope to close it by accepting one of the alternatives he proposes. I shall be perfectly content to recieve the original he drew in Philadelphia in 1805 , which was of the common size (what the painters call, I believe, a bust) . it will...
Your favor of Jan. 20. is just now recieved on the subject of mr Stewart and my portrait. he must have spoken without reflexion when he supposed it in my possession and hanging in my hall. the peculiarities of his temper and ideas render him a difficult subject to handle. in the inclosed letter I have endeavored to bring his recollection to rights as softly as I can. with respect to the 1 st...
I recieved yesterday your favor of June 24. and am very sensible of the interest you so kindly take in my health. the eruptive complaint which came upon me in Aug. last was unquestionably produced by the use bath of the warm springs, which I tried on account of rheumatism . the cause of the eruption was mistaken, and it was treated with severe unctions of mercury & sulphur. these reduced me to...
I never saw till lately the IX th vol. of Wilson ’s Ornithology. to this a life of the Author is prefixed, by a mr Ord , in which he has indulged himself in great personal asperity against myself. these things in common I disregard, but he has attached his libel to a book which is to go into all countries & thro’ all time. he almost makes his heroe die of chagrin at my refusing to associate...
I duly re cieved, on my late return to this place your acceptable favor of Apr. 22.    in looking back on past life the greatest pleasure I feel, is in recollections of the friends who have been my fellow-laborers, & my greatest happiness in the harmony and affection in which I lived & parted with them. of the manner in which your command in the army was made to cease, no one felt stronger...
I am obliged to borrow a hand to thank you for your favour of March 11th. and for introducing to me, Mr Binon—whom I find to be a Gentleman of Sense and Letters—as well as Taste and skill—in all the fine Arts—He has been an agreeable Companion—and we have been fortunate enough to procure the best Accommodations Accommodations for him— Excuse me for I can barely write the name of your Friend,...
I ask the favor of you when at Boston to engage for me fourteen tons of plaister of Paris to be delivered at Richmond to mess rs Gibson and Jefferson , my correspondents there, who will on my account pay for the same on delivery whatever sum you shall have agreed on for all costs and charges, the party presenting to them this paper with the sum endorsed by yourself. I will in the mean time...
I have recieved your favor of Feb. 27. with very great pleasure, and sincerely reciprocate congratulations on the late events. peace was indeed desirable; yet it would not have been as welcome without the successes of New Orleans . these last have established truths too important not to be valued: that the people of Louisiana are sincerely attached to the union: that their city can be...
Being desirous of obtaining for the Department of War, services which I thought you could render with peculiar advantage, & hoping that for a time at least you might consent to step into that Dept. I took the liberty, without a previous communication, for which there was not time, to nominate you as successor to Mr. Monroe who was called back to the Dept. of State. I had not a doubt from all...
Yours of the 6th. came duly to hand. A letter about the same time was recd. by the Dept. of War, from Govr. Strong on the same subject. I desired Mr. Monroe to inclose you a copy of his answer, which will shew you the ground taken with the Govr. What will be his final ground with respect to the Genl. Govt. remains to be seen. In the mean time, and under the peculiarity of the Crisis, we must...
I present to you mr Rives , the bearer of this, an eleve of mine in law and politics. he is able, learned, honest, & orthodox in his principles. being just about to enter on the stage of public life he wishes first to see something more of our country at large. he will be one of the distinguished men of our state , & of the United States . in taking him by the hand while in Boston you will...
I have recd yours of the 24. July. As my esteem and regard have undergone no change, I wish you to be apprized that such was the state of .things, and such the turn they were taking, that the retirement which is the subject of your letter, was pressed by your best personal friends. It was my purpose to have written to you on the occasion, but it was made impossible by a severe illness, from...
Your two favors of Decr have lain long without acknowledgment. For some after they came to hand I delayed it in expectation of such further information as to Gen. Smith, as would enable me to judge better of his case; and latterly I considered it as probable that I might have an opportunity, not now expected, of making that as well as other matters, subjects of conversation with you here. I...
I have recd. your favor of Sepr. 30. I am glad to find that you have succeeded in producing such apprehensions at Montreal as to prevent reinforcements from that quarter to the posts above. It would have been fortunate if you could have derived such Militia & Volunteer aids from Vermont & Eastward of it, as might have substantially have [ sic ] a like controul on Prevost, and thereby have...
The last of your favors which I have to acknowlege is that of the 3d. Ult: from Boston. I am glad to see that you are again at Albany; where your presence will aid much in doing all that can be done for the reputation of the campaign. The lapse of time & the unproductiveness of the laws, contemplating a regular force, and volunteers for an entire year, under federal commissions, compel us to...
The inclosed letter will explain to you it’s object, which I have thought would go safest to Boston first under the friendly protection of your cover, and that you would be so good as to add any thing to the superscription which may be necessary to carry it thro’ the post office safely to it’s address. this favor I ask of you. I saw with great joy your nomination to the command of the military...
I have just recd. from the Senate their concurrence (23 to 9 votes) in your nomination as a Majr. General. I give you the earliest notice, that without waiting for a formal communication, you may hasten your setting out for Washington. It is understood that your collectorship is to cease only on your being called into service, at which date your military emoluments will commence. In order to...
Congress have just passed the act adding twenty odd thousand troops to the Military establishment. It provides for two Major Generals & 5 brigadiers. The importance of placing this and the other forces in view, under the best commanders, speaks for itself. Our eyes could not but be turned, on such an occasion, to your qualifications & experience; and I wait for your permission only to name you...
I write from a place which I visit occasionally, near the New London of this state, 90. miles from Monticello , and where I have not the means of examining whether I have let pass the annual period pass over of saying ‘all’s well’ and ‘how d’ye do’? your letter of came in due time. I had learned by the newspapers the afflicting event it announced, had felt it as your friend, and as the friend...
I had the pleasure of duly receiving yours of the 8th. inclosing a Copy of your son’s oration. In the hurry of the period, I have been able to give it a flying perusal only. But I do not accede to your limitation of its merits so much to an honest zeal. It has claims to a much higher character, with the addition of this laudable feature. I am just on the point of leaving Washington where I...
Your favor of May 31. was duly recieved, and I join in congratulations with you on the resurrection of republican principles in Massachusets & N. Hampshire , and the hope that the professors of these principles will not again easily be driven off their ground. the federalists, during their short lived ascendancy, have nevertheless, by forcing us from the embargo, have inflicted a wound on our...
I have recd. your favor of the 30th. Ult: accompanied by the Discourse of one of your D. D’s. This is the most signal instance I have seen, of a prostitution of the sacred functions. If such be the religion, morality, & citizenship of the federal clergy & colleges, it is not to be wondered that the pious & patriotic people of N. England are forsaking such guides, and rallying to the Republican...
In undertaking to give you an account of the Manafactories in this neighbourhood I am apprehensive, I have, engaged more than I shall be able to perform to your satisfaction. From my earliest Recollection, it has been a common observation that within two or three years, after a general Peace in Europe, American Commerce has declined to such a degree as to introduce Distress among the People...
I received, but yesterday your Letter of the 30th of August. Convinced of the Wisdom and Sound Policy of this Measure of Government, I accept with Pleasure your Commission: and will execute it to the best of my Capacity and in as Short a time as possible. My field of Investigation is however so narrow the very little can be can be expected from, Sir your / humble Servant PHC : Charles Roberts...
I have recd. your favor of the 7th. Tonningen being included in the Consulate of Mr. Forbes who resides at Hamburg, and being now the real commercial port of that Consulate, it would not consist with what is due to him, to comply with the wishes of Col. Russel. Mr. F. has acquitted himself as one of the most intelligent and active of the Consular Corps; and when not at Tonningen himself, is...
The bearer of this is mr Thomas M. Randolph half brother of my son in law of that name whom you know. he is proceeding to Harvard college to enter there as a student. having lived at a distance from me, I can say little of him from my personal knolege, but I am authorised by those in whom I have confidence to say that he is a youth of good dispositions & correct conduct. his father was my most...
I have been favored with yours of the 1st. instant. We have seen nothing yet which sufficiently discloses the course which the Legislature at Boston is to take. The Governors Speech is in a tone somewhat different from his Report last Winter; but what must be thought of the disposition which could thank Osgood for a Sermon, which substitutes for the evangelical spirit he professes to feel, a...
So entirely are my habits changed from constant labour at my writing table, to constant & active occupation without doors, that it is with difficulty I can resolve to take up my pen. I must do it however as a matter of duty to thank you for the dumb fish you have been so kind as to have forwarded, & which are recieved safely & are found to be excellent. but I do it with pleasure also as it...
Mr. Gallatin having requested that letters might be written to the Governors for militia aid to his Collectors, I, without reflection, wrote the inclosed in my own name. but on consideration it seems more proper that it should go from yourself. the ideas I had expressed are those I supposed proper, you will make such alterations as you may think better. in general it may be easily accomodated...
I suppose that in answering Govr. Drayton we should compliment his ardor, & smooth over our non-compliance with his request; that he might be told that the President sees, in his present application a proof of his vigilance & zeal in whatever concerns the public safety, and will count with the more confidence on his future attentions & energy whenever circumstances shall call for them. that he...
I have read with pleasure the letter of Capt Davidson by which, according to unanimous resolves of the company of light infantry of the first legion of the militia of Columbi a commanded by him, he tenders their services as volunteers under the act of Congress of Feb. 24. 1807 I accept the offer and render to Capt. Davidson & the other officers & privates of the company that praise to which...
Will you be so good as to consider the inclosed answer to the Little Turtle, & suggest any necessary alterations, & return it to me.—I believe you have not returned me the rough draught for the Beaver. if the copies can be made out tomorrow, we may meet the Indians the next day. DLC : Papers of Thomas Jefferson.
I have prepared the two principal answers to the Indians, & pray you to read them attentively & to suggest any alterations you would advise. in that to the Poughtewatamy, it is difficult to go exactly as far in restraining him as we can without committing ourselves absolutely to oppose force, which we must not do. I do not think I yet understand sufficiently the evidence against the claim of...
I shall be ready to recieve any of the Indians tomorrow. I send you a sketch of the answer I propose to the Chippoway, for correction. I suppose he will deliver his speech in his own tongue, and that I may give the answer at the same time, if he introduces no new matter. DLC : Papers of Thomas Jefferson.
I inclose you a charge by mr Hanson against Capt Smith & Lieutenants Davis & Dobbins of the militia, as having become members of an organized company, calling themselves the Tar-company, avowing their object to be the tarring & feathering citizens of some description. altho in ordinary cases the animadversions of the law may be properly relied on to prevent what is unlawful, yet with those...
Th: Jefferson requests the favor of Genl: & Mrs. Dearborn & Mr. Wingate to dine with him on Monday the 17th: at half after three, The favor of an answer is asked. Privately owned.
Extract of a letter from Mr. John Sibley dated Natchitoches Octr. 12. 1808. Every thing in this quarter is quiet. the Season is healthy and very great crops of every thing. No occurrence amongst the Indians worthy of notice. Every body wishes the Embargo raised; but not untill the object for which it was layed is affected; or it is found insufficient to affect it. The late events in Spain seem...
The inclosed papers were recd. at Monticello, a little before I left it & were put by to be communicated to you here; but were in fact left there by mistake. I have just recieved & now communicate them. Affectte. salutns. PHi : Daniel Parker Papers.
Genl. Dearborne be so good as to read the inclosed and decide on what is best, returning the papers to mr Gallatin with whom it may be useful perhaps for him to confer PHi : Daniel Parker Papers.
I inclose for your consideration several applications for military commissions. the recommendations of Doctr. Macaulay are very strong. he called on me, and one cannot help being influenced somewhat by the appearance of a man. he is quite a well looking subject, but not too much so for a Captain . altho’ a majority is mentioned, I presume less will be accepted. There is no man in South...
Yours of Aug. 18. is this moment recieved, & I forward you a letter of July 16. from Govr. Lewis from which you will percieve that the cloud between us, the Iowas, Foxes & Sacs is cleared up. he says nothing of the Osages; but I presume their enemies have taken advantage of the withdrawing our protection from them. should you not have issued orders for the 100,000 men, I believe it may rest...
Yours of Aug. 15. was recieved yesterday. I regret extremely that the estimate of the blocks at N. York should place them above our appropriation. the data of calculation should be above all question to justify suspending the operation. but, if they are to cost a million, altho’ I should be for it, yet Congress should be consulted.   I inclose you a letter from George Mosley wishing to be a...
In my letter of yesterday I omitted to inclose that of Hern, which I now do. I add to it a newspaper from St. Louis, in which is an account of the surrender of some Indian murderers. this paper says there were 3. or 4. whites murdered, but I think Govr. Lewis’s letter says but 1. on that ground I wrote to him to recommend, if they should be convicted, to suffer only one to be executed, unless...
In my letter of the 15th. I informed you that I had authorised Govr. Tompkins to order out such aids of militia on lake Ontario & the Canada line as he should find necessary to enforce the embargo, not exceeding 500. he proposing to repair thither himself to select trusty persons. I am now to request that you will have measures taken for their pay, subsistence & whatever else is requisite. I...
I inclose you a letter of July 1. from Govr. Lewis recieved from the war office by the last post. It presents a full, & not a pleasant view of our Indian affairs West of the Misipi. as the punishment of the Osages has been thought necessary, the means employed appear judicious. first to draw off the friendly part of the nation, & then withdrawing the protection of the US. leave the other...
I inclose you letters from McLure & Keteltas, asking military appointment, also one recieved from your office from Govr. Hull. official information of continued acts of forcible & insurrectionary opposition to the embargo law on the Canada line, & a letter to that effect from Govr. Tomkins, have obliged me to authorise him to call out detachments of his militia. as he will go to the spot...
Yours of July 27. has been recieved. I now inclose you the letters of Hawkins, Harrison, Wells, Hull & Claiborne recieved from the war office, and, as I conjecture, not yet seen by you. Indian appearances, both in the North West & South are well. beyond the Missisipi they are not so favorable. I fear Governor Lewis has been too prompt in committing us with the Osages so far as to oblige us to...