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Copy and transcript: National Archives; copy: University of Virginia Library Mr. A. Lee presents his compliments to Messrs. Franklin and Deane, and begs to know whether tomorrow at 11 oClock will be agreeable for them to consult on what he proposed relative to their being acknowledged. The proposal to obtain French recognition of the commissioners, made in his letter of Feb. 26: above, XXV ,...
AL : American Philosophical Society Mr. Lee’s Compliments. Mr. Girard appeared much surprizd at the doubt about the frigate, as he had sent the necessary Dispatches to Passi yesterday which made it plain that no alteration had taken place respecting the frigate at Bordeaux. He thinks Mr. Beaumarchais shoud be desird to bring in his Account, and that we shoud send it to Count V. who will...
With very great pleasure I heard of your safe arrival at Philadelphia. with still greater, that you were speedily to re-imbark for France—The reasons which produced the one, or may have induced the other, I have not heard, nor have I a desire to know; sufficient it is to be informed, that you are again called upon for a further exertion (at a foreign Court) of those abilities, and that...
Copy and transcript: National Archives Lee reached Berlin on June 4, and soon discovered that his mission would encounter major obstacles. He announced his arrival to Count Schulenburg, the Prussian Minister, and sent him detailed suggestions about how trade might be established between Prussian and American ports. Out of the correspondence that ensued in the next three weeks the central...
Transcript: National Archives; incomplete copies: National Archives, Harvard University Library When the conversation turned to day on giving Mr. Williams credit for 200,000 l.t. more on our Banker, as we were just parting there was not time to consider the subject so maturely as the largeness of the demand seems to me to require. But I presume it cannot be either proper or warrantable in us...
Copy: Harvard University Library; copy and transcript: National Archives; extracts with added paragraph: Harvard University Library, National Archives I have not yet receivd a line from you. It is not easy to divine the reason of so long a silence. There is for sale here and deliverable in any port in France, fourteen thousand weight of brass Cannon at 6 Guineas the Quintal, and Six thousand...
Copy: Haverford College Library; copy: National Archives <Philadelphia, October 23, 1776: We have written you twice today by different ships. This letter goes by the Andrew Doria to St. Eustatius, to be forwarded to William Bingham and by him to you in a French vessel. We enclose two resolutions of Congress. The first replaces Thomas Jefferson as commissioner with Arthur Lee, whom you will...
DS : Connecticut Historical Society; DS : Library of Congress; copy: South Carolina Historical Society; copy: Yale University Library We the underwritten, being the Committee of Congress for secret Correspondence, do hereby certify whom it may concern, that the Bearer, the Honourable Silas Deane Esquire, one of the Delegates from the Colony of Connecticut, is appointed by us to go into France,...
ALS : Blumhaven Library and Gallery, Philadelphia; two copies: Yale University Library I have had a long and very angry Letter from Mr. Lee, about your going without acquainting him with it, in which his Disorder seems to encrease, for he raves not only against you and me, but seems to resent the Court’s sending a Minister to Congress without advising with him. I bear all his Rebukes with...
ALS : American Philosophical Society Franklin is here forwarding word of a most unwelcome development. Wickes’s cruise had raised a storm in Whitehall, and on July 8 Stormont protested in strong terms to Maurepas and Vergennes. The Ministers met that evening, according to Wentworth, and the following evening Maurepas and Sartine discussed with considerable heat what should be said to the...