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My letters, for the future will come to you, not from a School House but from the Cell of an Hermit. I am removed from Worcester to Braintree where I live secluded from all the Cares and Fatigues of busy Life in a Chamber which no mortal Visits but myself except once in a day to make my Bed. A Chamber which is furnished in a very curious manner, with all sorts of Hermetical Utensils. Here, no...
Braintree, October? 1758. Printed: JA, Earliest Diary The Earliest Diary of John Adams , ed. L. H. Butterfield and others, Cambridge, 1966. , p. 65–66 . Printed : ( JA, Earliest Diary The Earliest Diary of John Adams , ed. L. H. Butterfield and others, Cambridge, 1966. , p. 65–66 .)
Copy: Library of Congress I received Lately your Letter of the 13th. of may, with the Papers relative to the Loss of the Brigantine fairplay. I had on the first Intelligence of that accident from the west Indies, made application to the Minister of the marine in favour of the sufferers, and received from him the answer of which I formerly Sent you a Copy; but as that may have miscarried, I now...
Since my Arrival in this City, which was on the 9th. of this Month I had the Pleasure of your Letter concerning your Vessel which was sunk in the West Indies. I immediately waited on Dr. Franklin who informed me that he had received a similar Letter from you and in the Time of it applied to Court and obtained an order for your Compensation, which he transmitted to you, and which I hope you...
Copy: Library of Congress I wrote to you the 17th. of October last, on the Subject of your unfortunate Brig. I suppose you received that Letter, as the Vessel I sent it by arrived. I now enclose a Copy of the Answer I some time since received to my Application on your Behalf, together with a Copy of a Letter I wrote immediately on receiving that Answer. I have since heard nothing more of the...
I have the Honor to acknowlege the Receipt of your joint Letter of the 18th instant. Happy, inexpressibly happy, in the certain Intelligence, of a general Peace, which was concluded on the 20th Jnry—I feel an additional pleasure in reflecting that this glorious Event will prove a sure means to dispel the Fears expressed by your Commonwealth for their North Eastern Boundary, that Territory...
I have rec d , Yesterday, your obliging Letter of the fifth of December, having before received and answered as I Suppose, my Letter Book of that time being at Paris, those of July and August.— These Letters have given me great Pleasure as they let me into the Spirit of the Times and of Affairs in a Country, whose Happiness interests me very much. It would be improper for me perhaps, if I were...
I had last night the Pleasure of your Letter of Dec r: 21. I cannot, indeed Sir flatter myself at present that the Nation will receive, “the greatest Benefits” from any of my Labours in a public Line. It is a Consolation to me under all discouragements, to reflect upon services, which I have now & then had Opportunities of rendering. But such Occasions rarely occur: public Life is like a long...
My Son is going home, and for his sake as well as my own, I will not let him go without a Line to you. We are glad to find that Congress are in a Place where they may be comfortably accommodated, and are anxious to learn their Decisions. probably they may adjourn in June, but I hope they will accomplish something towards raising a Fund for the payment of the Interest of their Debts abroad and...
Your favour of Jan: 23. like all your other Letters, contains valuable information & judicious reflections— The time is now come, when the affairs of the United states must take a turn for the better or become much worse— The Impost I presume is granted to Congress by this time. I only wish it were 20 p r. Cent instead of 5— indeed if 40. were necessary, to pay the Compleat interest of the...