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Your letter of the 12th Ulto inclosing the recommendatory Amendments to the proposed plan of Government by your Convention, did not come to hand till last Saturday, or it should have had an earlier acknowledgement. The adoption of the Constitution by the State of Massachusetts will undoubtedly have a very happy influence upon the decision of those States which have yet to determine upon the...
By your letter & Acct of the 22d of Feby 1786, there appears a balance in my favor of fifteen pounds thirteen shillings Lawful Money, which I take the liberty to draw a bill for in favor of Mr Thomas Porter of Alexandria, payable ten days after sight. I am happy to find by the last Accounts from the Northward that the disturbances in your State were almost totally suppressed, & I hope before...
I have now the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your several favors of the 6th 9th & 16th of Novr & 22d of Feby. I purposely delayed my acknowledgments of the first three, ’till I should receive the one promised therein, that I might give you no more trouble with my concerns than was unavoidable. I feel myself under great obligation to you for your obliging & disinterested attention to my...
I was honoured with your letter of Octob. 25. by Mr. Barrett: and am to thank you for an introduction to his acquaintance. The matter of the whale oil was settled before he came. I need not trouble you with the details of this however as I have written them to his Excellency Governor Bowdoin. The indulgence obtained is made temporary. I suppose this was done to give them an opportunity of...
The last Post gave me the honor of your favor of the 7th inst: for which & your care of the Jack and his Keeper, I pray you to accept my grateful thanks. As the Jack is now safely landed, & as I am unwilling to hazard him again at Sea, I have sent a man in whom I can confide, to conduct him & the Spaniard to this place by Land. The person I send has not the smallest knowledge of the Spanish...
Last evening Mons r: de le Tombe called upon me with your letter of 3 d. July, inclosing the Massachusetts’ Act of Navigation. As you do me the honor to ask my Sentiments of this law, you shall have them without disguise. If the legislature passed it from a sanguine expectation that it will soon force or intimidate the British Ministry into such a treaty of Commerce as we desire, or can agree...
Within a few days I have rec d your Favour of the 16 of August, with the Resolve of the General Court of the 6 and 7 of July. The Line between Massachusetts and Nova Scotia gave me much Uneasiness at the Time of the Negotiation of the Provisional Articles, and Still continues to distress me. I knew that the French in former Times, had a Practice of erecting an holy Cross of Wood upon every...
I have rec d your Favour of the Second of June by M r Tracy. as I Stopped in London only a few Hours, I had not an Oppertunity to see him: but I flatter myself with the Hope of Seeing him and M r Jackson here, where at length I am happily established with my Family. M r Jefferson and M r Humphreys are arrived, and Shall Soon begin our Work. I am So near D r Franklin, that it is but a pleasant...
This Evening I had the Honour of your Letter by Mr. Bradford. When that young Gentleman shall arrive, he shall be treated with all the Civility in my Power, and the best Advice that I am able to give him, shall be at his service. I fancy, sir, they exaggerate the Number of Troops both at N.Y. and R.I. I am persuaded there are not four Thousand Men at either. We have just received News from the...
I had the Favour of a Letter from you some time ago which I answered immediately, but so many of my Letters are among the Fishes of the sea, that I fear that may be one. You know very well that is a long time that I have had a very bad Opinion of the Designs and Dispositions of the B. Court towards America. I assure you I have not conceived a more favourable Idea, since my Arrival in Europe....
I had this Day the Pleasure of your Letter by Captain Barnes, of June 9. I did myself the Honour, when in Boston to call at your House, but was told you was ill and could not be seen, upon which I sent in my Name, as the Fashion is, intending to call at another opportunity, but was dissappointed. I had a very disagreable Passage, to this Country, passing through many Dangers, from the Wrath of...
I am favoured with yours of the 20th last month, in which you make a request for five thousand of the Arms, lately arrived from France, for the use of the Troops of your State. As your letter went on to Philadelphia it only reached my hands a few days ago. I cannot conceive that such a number could be wanting, had proper pains been taken to collect the public Arms, and to purchase all that...
I had, by yesterdays Post, the Honour of your Letter of the 15th. instant. I Should esteem it an Honour, and an Happiness, to discharge the friendly Trust of Executor to Mr. Quincys Will, (because I have a great Respect to his Memory and a great Regard for his Family,) if my Situation and Circumstances were such that I could possibly accomplish it, with Advantage to the Interest of the Family....
I received your favor of the 3d Instt on Tuesday Evening, covering that of the Committee of Salem to your Honorable Court, and Judging the Intelligence Interesting and important, I immediately forwarded Copies of both to Congress by the Express, for them to give such order & direction respecting It, as they might think proper & requisite. I have not yet received their Answer, as soon as I do,...
I had wrote you several posts before my hearing you was returned. I should be very glad if you and Mrs. Adams could take a turn this way before you return to Philadelphia again. I had lately a schooner arrived, with some powder, at Barnstable, rather better than three hundred pounds, which was disposed of there, as the people wanted it much. I understand that any person importing powder shall...
The degree of acquaintance I have with you, through your indulgence; and your known candour, condescention and goodness, encourage me to address you on an affair, which, in my view, is very interesting, and calls for the particular attention of the honorable members of the Continental Congress. They have indeed manifested much wisdom and benevolence in advising to a total stop of the slave...
We are informed by his Excellency General Washington, that it is his opinion, the paying our Troops, by the Lunar Month, will throw the rest of the Army into disorder, as the Continental Congress have resolved, that it is the Kalender Month they mean to pay by; and that the difference between the two, must be consider’d as a Colonial, and not a Continental Charge. We are sensible, it is...
Watertown, 11 November 1775. (Misc. Papers of the Continental Congress, Reel No. 8). Although the credentials as passed by the house bear the date 10 November, the Journal of the House of Representatives Journals of the House of Representatives of Massachusetts [1715- ], Boston, reprinted by the Massachusetts Historical Society, 1919- . (For the years for which reprints are not yet available,...
Watertown, 25 July 1775. FC ( M-Ar : Mass. House of Representatives Records, 57:263). As speaker, James Warren notified JA and the other members of the delegation of their election to the Council and expressed the wish that they would take their seats on the Council as soon as their duties in the congress permitted. Their election to the Council had taken place on 21 July. JA took his seat on...
I Received the Letters, with which you were pleased to favor me per Mr. Fessenden on Saturday last being the 18th Instant, at a Critical Time for the Army posted at Cambridge. The Evening preceeding Orders were Issued in Consequence of a Consultation between the General Officers and Committee of Safety to take possession of Dorchester Hill and Bunkers hill in Charlestown which I must confess...
AL (draft): American Philosophical Society I have been favour’d with yours of Sept. 24. and Oct. 26. from Philada. Nov. 14. and Dec. 5. from Boston, and thank you for the Information communicated. It gives my Mind some Ease to learn that such good Care is taken both by the General and the Town to prevent Mischief. I hope that Care will continue and be effectual. And that People will be...
ALS : New York Public Library I wrote to you a few Days since, and have little to add. The Election for Lord Mayor ended on Saturday, when Wilkes was chosen by a great Majority both of the Livery and of the Aldermen; and ’tis thought he will carry the Elections of 4 Members for the City, 2 for the Borough of Southwark, 2 for Westminster, and 2 for the County of Middlesex, himself one of the...
ALS : New York Public Library Since my last to you, which went per Capt. Foulger, the Parliament, by a sudden and unexpected Resolution in the Cabinet, has been dissolved. Various are the Conjectures as to the Motives; among which one is, that some Advices from Boston, importing the Impossibility of carrying on Government there under the late Acts of Parliament, have made it appear necessary...
Since I wrote you, Jealousies seem to rise higher between the People and the Army. It has been Rumour’d they were about to Fortifie Dorchester neck, which if they Attempt I am well satisfyd the people will Rise, but at Present that Report Seems to Subside. There was a plan of their intended Operations droped and which was made publick. I have it not by me but the Substance that Occurs, was to...
ALS : Public Record Office I wrote to you lately by the Boston Packet, Capt. Shepherd, and by several preceding Conveyances. I should be glad to hear from you what Letters of mine came to your hands, as I suspect they are often intercepted. The Ministers have for some time been out of town, as well as those of both Houses who are Friends of America. But the latter have frequent Communications,...
ALS : Public Record Office I received, last week only, your Favour of June 27. and I have received no other from you since that of April 30. You complain of hearing seldom from me, and yet I have written oftener this Year than ever before. I apprehend our Letters are intercepted. I hope you have received mine of June 1. for in that you will find the Dates of many of the Letters I had written...
ALS : American Philosophical Society; duplicate: New York Public Library It is a long time since I have been favoured by a Line from you. I suppose you thought me on my Return to America, and that your Letters would probably not reach me here. But I have been advised by our Friends to stay till the Result of your Congress should arrive. The Coolness, Temper, and Firmness of the American...
ALS : Public Record Office The last Line I have been favour’d with from you, is of the 30th of April. I have since written to you several times. I hope our Correspondence is not intercepted. This serves to cover a Pamphlet or two just published here; of which I shall send you a Number, as I think it may be of Use in America to see what Sentiments are entertain’d here: And believing they maybe...
ALS : Public Record Office; draft: American Philosophical Society I receiv’d your Favour of April 30. By the next Boston Ship I shall send you all the perfected Acts lately pass’d relating to our Province, of which I sent you Copies while in the State of Bills: ’Till then I defer any Remarks on them. At present I only send Copies of two more Letters of Mr. Hutchinson’s. The Chancery Suit goes...
ALS and copy: Public Record Office; draft: American Philosophical Society I received your respected Favour of March 31. with another of the same Date from the Committee. The latest of my Letters which had then come to your Hands was of Jany. 7. since which I have written several, viz. of Feb. 2 to yourself, and one of the same Date to the Committee. Of Feb. 15. containing a full Account of the...
ALS : Public Record Office I have written several Letters to you lately by different Conveyances, and sent you the Bills pass’d and about to be pass’d relating to our Province. I now send the Report of the Committee of the Lords, which seems hard upon us, as every thing written by any Officer of Government is taken for undoubted Truth. I can now only add, that I am, as ever, with great...
ALS : Public Record Office The above are Copies of my two last. The Torrent is still violent against America. A Bill is brought in to alter the Charter, appointing the Council by the Crown, giving Power to the Governors to nominate and commission Magistrates without Consent of Council, and forbidding any Town Meeting to be held in the Province (except the annual one for chusing Town Officers)...
ALS : American Antiquarian Society; copy: Public Record Office My last was of the 22d past, since which I have received none of your Favours. I mentioned that the Bill brought into Parliament for Punishing Boston, met with no Opposition. It did however meet with a little before it got through, some few of the Members speaking against it in the House of Commons, and more in the House of Lords....
AL (copy): Public Record Office I received your Favour of Jan. 23. I suppose we never had since we were a People, so few Friends in Britain. The violent Destruction of the Tea seems to have united all Parties here against our Province, so that the Bill now brought into Parliament for shutting up Boston as a Port till Satisfaction is made, meets with no Opposition. An Alteration in our Charter...
Reprinted from Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society , first series, III (1794), 109–16. I Wrote a line to you by the last packet, just to acquaint you there had been a hearing on our petition. I shall now give you the history of it as succinctly as I can. We had long imagined that the king would have considered that petition as he had done the preceding one in his cabinet, and...
Extract reprinted from William Temple Franklin, ed., Memoirs of the Life and Writings of Benjamin Franklin … (3 vols., 4to, London, 1817–18), II , 209–10. I received the honour of yours dated October 28 with the Journals of the house and Mr. Turner’s Election Sermon. I waited on Lord Dartmouth on his return to town, and learnt that he had presented to his majesty our petition for the removal...
ALS : Public Record Office I duly received your Favour of the 26th of Augt. with the Letter enclos’d for Lord Dartmouth, which I immediately sent to him. As soon as he comes to Town I shall wait upon his Lordship, and discourse with him upon the Subject of it; and I shall immediately write to you what I can collect from the Conversation. In my Opinion the Letter of the two Houses of the 29th...
ALS : Public Record Office Nothing of Importance has occurr’d here since my last. This serves chiefly to cover a Newspaper, in which I have stated a few of the American Grievances that were omitted in my Receipt for diminishing a great Empire. These odd ways of presenting Matters to the publick View, sometimes occasion them to be more read, more talk’d of, and more attended to. With great...
Reprinted from William Duane, ed., The Works of Benjamin Franklin … (6 vols., Philadelphia, 1808–18), VI , 331–2. The above is a copy of my last, per packet. Inclosed is the original letter therein mentioned. His lordship continues in the country, but is expected (secretary Pownall tells me) the beginning of next month. To avoid repealing the American tea duty, and yet find a vent for tea, a...
Extract reprinted from Jared Sparks, ed., The Works of Benjamin Franklin … (10 vols., Boston, 1836–40), VIII , 83 n. In my last I informed you, that the address to the King, and the letter from the General Court to Lord Dartmouth, are both transmitted to his Lordship. Enclosed are copies of his answers to Mr. Bollan and myself. There are some expressions in the close of his Lordship’s letter...
ALS (letterbook draft): Library of Congress I received duly your several Favours of June 25, 26, and 30. with the Papers enclosed. My Lord Dartmouth being at his Country Seat, in Staffordshire, I transmitted to him the Address for the Removal of the Govr. and Lieut. Govr. and Mr. Bollan and I jointly transmitted the Letter to his Lordship from both Houses. I delivered to Mr. Bollan one Set of...
ALS : Public Record Office; letterbook draft: Library of Congress I am favour’d with yours of June 14 and 16. the latter containing some Copies of the spirited Resolves of the Committee upon the Letters. I see from your Account of the Transaction, that you could not well prevent what was done. As to the Rumour that other Copies were come from England, I know that could not be. It was an...
ALS : Public Record Office; ALS (letterbook draft): Library of Congress I am favoured with yours of April 20, and May 6. The Letters communicated to you were not merely to “satisfy the Curiosity” of any, but it was thought there might be a Use in showing them to some Friends of the Province, and even to some of the Governor’s Party, for their more certain Information concerning his Conduct and...
ALS : Public Record Office; letterbook draft: Library of Congress In the paragraph of this letter that deals with the Tea Act, Franklin implies that the purpose of the statute was “to keep up the Exercise of the Right” to tax the colonies. This idea was sure to be a red rag to the Bostonian bull. All that is known about the passage of the act, however, indicates that the ministry avoided the...
AL (copy ): Public Record Office; ALS (letterbook draft): Library of Congress Since my last, which was of the 6th past, I have been honour’d with yours of March 6. and 24. inclosing a Petition to the King, and a Letter to Lord Dartmouth. On considering the whole, I concluded that a longer Delay of presenting the first Petition and Remonstrance was not likely to answer any good Purpose, and...
LS (duplicate): Public Record Office; letterbook draft: Library of Congress Franklin’s account in this letter of his interview with Lord Dartmouth indicates how little scope was left to either of them, two years before Lexington, to further reconciliation between Massachusetts and the mother country. Both the Englishman and the American wanted an end to the quarrel, yet neither could find a...
ALS : Public Record Office; letterbook draft: Library of Congress My last was of the 9th past, since which nothing material has occurr’d relating to the Colonies. The Assembly’s Answer to Gov. Hutchinson’s Speech is not yet come over; but I find that even his Friends here are apprehensive of some ill Consequences from his forcing the Assembly into that Dispute, and begin to say it was not...
ALS (letterbook draft): Library of Congress I did myself the Honour of Writing to you the 2d of December, and the 5th of January past. Since which I have received your Favour of Nov 28. inclosing the Votes and Proceedings of the Town of Boston, which I have reprinted here with a Preface. Herewith I send you a few Copies. Governor Hutchinson’s Speech at the Opening of your Jany. Session, has...
ALS and copy: Public Record Office; letterbook draft: Library of Congress I did myself the Honour of Writing to you on the 2d of December past inclosing some news papers to 30th november last which I hope got safe to hand. I have since received your Favour of Oct. 27. which containing in a small Compass so full an Enumeration of our Grievances, the Steps necessary to a Removal of them, and the...
ALS and incomplete copy: Public Record Office; letterbook draft: Library of Congress The interview described in the first part of this letter involved Franklin further in the developing crisis in Massachusetts, and the enclosure he described in the second part inflamed that crisis and deeply affected the remainder of his English mission. The importance of the letter is obvious, and so are the...