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Inclosed we have the honor to transmit Your Excellency sundry resolutions of Congress of the 5th instant; by which you will judge of the present temper of that body, respecting the affairs of the grants. We cannot, however, absolutely rely upon the execution of the coercive part of them if the matter should require an exertion of force. Many who at a distance adopt very decisive ideas, might...
We inclose Your Excellency a letter to the corporation of Kingston open for your perusal that you may be informed what is likely to be the fate of their late offer. Your letter [with the Concurrent Resolves of the Senate and Assembly] on the subject of the state troops has been committed. We think it improbable Congress will accede to the idea. We congratulate your Excellency on the further...
Mr. Hamilton having transmitted Your Excellency the late proceedings of Congress for carrying the 8th. article of the confederation into execution, by which the legislature will see the part we acted in this affair. They will not be at aloss for our motives; and we hope will not disapprove them. Our opposition to the first plan proposed was founded principally on this consideration that it...
We have the honor to inclose Your Excellency the provisional articles agreed upon between the United States and Great Britain, which are upon the whole as advantageous as could have been expected. Whether the negotiations terminate in a general peace or not, important and it is to be hoped, useful consequences will flow from what has been done. The acknowlegement of our independence by Great...
We have the honor to inclose Your Excellency a copy of the resolutions passed on the [fifteenth Instant] relative to a ratification of the preliminary treaty—the reception of the posts in possession of the British troops and the surrender of the prisoners. We have this day received a letter from Sir Guy Carleton proposing that Congress should appoint one or more persons to assist persons...
We have the happiness to inform your Excellency that yesterday arrived the Triumph a Cutter from Cadiz, with letters from the Marquis La Fayette announc⟨ing⟩ the certainty of the preliminaries of a general peace signed between all the belligerent powers the 20th. of January. There are letters from the Count D’Estaing to the French Minister to the same effect, and an instruction from him to the...
Perhaps before this reaches you, you will have heard that the British have impliedly acknowleged our independence—by giving a commission of the 23d. of September to Mr Oswald to treat with The thirteen United States of America . Many are sanguine in expecting that peace will be the result of the Negotiations, for my part I have hopes, but if it should not be the case I shall not be much...
It is proper I should inform Your Excellency that Congress have lately removed to this place. I cannot enter into a detail of the causes; but I imagine they will shortly be published for the information of the United States. You will have heared of a mutiny among the soldiers stationed in the barracks of Philadelphia, and of their having surrounded the state house where Congress was sitting....
I have lately received a letter from the Superintendant of Finance inclosing a copy of a circular letter from him to the several states dated 25th of July 81 in which he requests information upon the following important points: “What supplies of every kind money provisions forage transportation &c. have been furnished by this State to the United States since the 18th. of March 1780.” “The...
A few days since I was honored with Your Excellency’s letter of the ; and was glad to find your ideas on the subject corresponded with mine. As I shall in a day or two take leave of Congress, I think it my duty to give my opinion to the legislature on a matter of importance to the state, which has been long depending and is still without a prospect of termination in the train in which it has...
[ New York, August 3, 1783. Letter not found. ] “General Hamilton to Governor George Clinton,” Columbia University Libraries.
For some time past I have had a bill on France lying in Philadelphia the sale of which has been delayed on account of the excessive lowness of the exchange. I am told it has lately risen something, and I expect by Col Hay’s return to receive a sufficient sum to pay the value of the woman Mrs. H had of Mrs. Clinton. I hope the delay may be attended with no inconvenience to you. I wrote you some...
In my last letter to Your Excellency I took occasion to mention that it was of great importance to the state, at this time to have a representation here as points in which by its present situation it is particularly interested are dayly and will be dayly agitated. It is also of importance at this moment to the United States (not only from general considerations but) because we have a very thin...
In two or three letters, which I have had the honor of writing to Your Excellency lately, I mentioned the necessity of a representation of the state here and at the same time of my returning to my private occupations. I am obliged to inform Your Excellency that I cannot remain here above ten days longer. I have the honor to be Yr. Excellency’s Most Obed ser ALS , Blumhaven Library and Gallery,...
As the Legislature will shortly meet I take the liberty to mention to Your Excellency, that it appears to me of Great importance, they should take up the affair of Vermont on the idea of a compromise with Massachusetts and New Hampshire and propose to those States a meeting of Commissioners for that purpose. I have little hope that we shall ever be able to engage Congress to act with decision...
The bearer of this is an old woman and of course the most troublesome animal in the world. She wants to go into New York. It was in vain we told her no inhabitant could be permitted by us to go within the enemy’s lines without permission from the civil power. Old and decrepid as she is, she made the tour of the family and tried her blandishments upon each. I assured her Governor Clinton could...
I am honored with your excellency’s letter of the 29th. Decr. I have received an order from Col. Hay on Mr. Sands, which I have no doubt will shortly be paid. I have felt no inconvenience from not having the money sooner. Since my last to you, we have received no further accounts from Europe, so that we remain in the same uncertainty with respect to the negotiations for peace. Wether it will...
I did myself the honor of writing to you, immediately after my arrival at Head Quarters, in answer to two letters I found here, from you. There is a matter, which often obtrudes itself upon my mind, and which requires the attention of every person of sense and influence, among us. I mean a degeneracy of representation in the great council of America. It is a melancholy truth Sir, and the...
In a letter which I wrote lately to General Schuyler, I informed him of the import of the answer from Vermont, and what had been done with it in Congress. The Committee to whom it was referred have not yet reported; but I have little expectation of decision. Congress have been for some time employed on matters of the 1st. importance, devising a plan for carrying the 8th. Article of the...
The President of Congress will of course have transmitted to Your Excellency the plan lately adopted by Congress for funding the public debt. This plan was framed to accommodate it to the objections of some of the states; but this spirit of accomodation will only serve to render it less efficient, without making it more palatable. The opposition of the state of Rhode Island for instance is...
I shall very shortly be out of cash, and shall therefore be much obliged to you to forward to me the State allowance. It will answer as well in Mr. Morris’ notes as in Specie provided the notes have not more than a fortnight or so to run. It will be better if they are due. ⟨A disappointment in this will greatly embarrass me, and from what your Excellency said, I take it for granted it cannot...
During my stay in this place, I have received intimations that certain officers high in command in this quarter have been guilty of practices, equally unjust, disgraceful to the Army, and injurious to the common cause; I mean seizing the property of the inhabitants of this State, and converting it to their own use, without any compensation either to the right owners, or to the State. A...
By advices from Philadelphia I find that the present is a period rather critical on the subject of money and concenters a variety of demands which it is not easy to satisfy. It becomes therefore of importance to the Financier to avail himself of every immediate resource. This induces me to request you will be so good as [to] inform me, whether there is any near prospect of obtaining the loan...
[ Albany, August 20, 1783. On August 20, 1783 , Hamilton wrote to Philip Van Rensselaer: “I send you a line to the Governor.” Letter not found. ]
In my letter of the 14th. I informed Your Excellency that Congress were employed in devising a plan for carrying the 8th article of the confederation into execution. This business is at length brought to a conclusion. I inclose for the information of the Legislature the proceedings upon it in different stages, by which they will see the part I have acted. But as I was ultimately left in a...
I have the honor to inclose Your Excellency the copy of a warrant from The Honorable Robert Morris Esqr. Superintendant of the Finances of the United States; by which you will perceive that agreeable to the resolution of Congress of the 2d. of November last, he has appointed me Receiver of the Continental Taxes for this state. I am therefore to request that the Legislature will be pleased to...
Capt. Coleman delivered me your two letters of the 5th & 6th, instant. The pleasure, I have, in corresponding with you, will dispose me, whenever I have any thing to communicate, that may be worth your attention, or that appears to me so, to trouble you with my sentiments: But I shall not expect you to make an equal return either in quantity or frequency. You will, in this, intirely consult...
By His Excellencys Command, I am to desire you will give orders upon the deputy Clothier General at Peeks-Kill, for the necessary supply of Cloathing &c. for the four companies raising under your direction. It is not however intended, that more shall be drawn than a sufficiency for the number of men actually inlisted. I am Sir   Your most Obedt servant ADfS , George Washington Papers, Library...
In the absence of His Excellency the Commander in Chief, the enclosed information has been received, which I take the liberty to forward to your Excellency, as the frontiers of this State appear to be particularly concerned thereby, if the intelligence should prove to be well founded. Since His Excellency left this, I have in consequence of his direction, ordered the Depy Qr Master to forward...
I have it in command from the General, who is gone to West Point to transmit your Excellency the purport of the favorable intelligence received last Night by Express from Trenton. The Pennsylvanians have given a decided & unequivocal proof of their attachment to the Country, and determination not to join the Enemy; by delivering up to General Wayne, an Emissary sent by the Enemy to tamper with...
His Excy the Comr in Chief directs me to send the inclosed Letter to your Excellency—in the present Situation of Affairs, the Genl is at a Loss in what Light to View persons taken under these Circumstances—and wishes your Excellencys pleasure to be signified respectg such as are Citizens of your State. With highest Respects I am &c. DLC : Papers of George Washington.
Valley Forge, February 16, 1778 . Describes sufferings at Camp because of lack of food and clothing. Asks Clinton to do all that is possible to forward supplies. Df , in writing of H, George Washington Papers, Library of Congress.
Since my letter of the 5th, on the subject of the number of Men necessary to compleat the Quota of your State, I have recollected a matter in the composition of Colo. Lambs Regt which I wish had been attended to at that time. Two independent Companies of Pennsylvania; consisting at present of only 39 Men, have been for some time past annexed to that Regt and are included in the number of 304...
A Captain who escaped from New York on Saturday Evening and who arrived here this morning, informs, that about Three Thousand Troops (British & Hessians) were embarked from the City & Staten Island when he came away. It was generally said, they had in contemplation an expedition to Chesepeak Bay and to make a descent on the Eastern Shore. There were some who conjectured, they mean to go up the...
One Losee, formerly an Inhabitant of this State, now a Deserter from the Enemy, is send to your Excellency’s disposal. It is asserted by a Certain Berrian (immediately from the Enemy) that Losee, was an Emissary charged with Dispatches for the Enemy at the Northward; I am also told Col. Da y ton has recd similar information of him. I have &c. DLC : Papers of George Washington.
I last evening recd the inclosed from Congress with a request that I would take measures for carrying the plan recommended by Colo. Hartley into execution. The advices which I have just recd from different quarters bear the strongest marks of an immediate evacuation of New York. These considerations induce me, should it be deemed expedient, to make an addition to Colonel Cortlands command by...
Your favor of the 12th instant was delivered me last night. I recollect, that Permission was granted Mrs Hatfield to visit her Husband, & had not the least Doubt, but she would be suffered to return whenever she had an Inclination, unless some singular Circumstances should render it ineligible for a Day or two. Her Detention seems to be by the Mayor, to whom she was referred for a Passport. As...
Capt. Machin has been employed since the year 1776 in the engineering Branch, without ever coming to any regular settlement for his Services. He does not chuse to fix any price himself, and I am really ignorant of what is just and proper. You have been a witness of a good deal of his work, and he is willing to submit the matter to your decision. Captain Machin holds a Commission in the...
The president of Congress has transmitted me Your Excellencys letter to the delegates of New York, representing the calamitous situation of the North Western frontier of that State—accompanied by a similar application from the Pennsilvania Assembly—and a Resolve of the 25th directing me to take the most effectual Measures for the protection of the inhabitants and chastisement of the indians....
The moment I recd yours of the 3d I gave orders to Genl Heath to detach the remaining three Regiments of the York Brigade to Albany there to put themselves under the command of Brig. Genl Clinton who has orders to dispose of them as circumstances may require—should you receive any information that they are not necessary above, you will be pleased to communicate it to Generall Heath, that their...
Two ships of force with their Tenders have Sailed up Hudsons River —I am apprehensive that they design to seize the passes in the Highlands by Land wh[ich] I am informed may be done by a small body of Men. I must therefore request you instantly to desire Genl Ten Broeck to March down as great force as he can Collect to secure them, particularly the post where the Road runs over Anthonies nose...
I have been honoured with yours of the 20th and 24th instants; the latter by Mr Harkermir who gives a melancholy account of the distresses of the inhabitants at the German Flatts. To defend an extensive frontier against the incursions of a desultory Enemy is next to impossible; but still if you think the addition of another Regiment, ill as I can spare it, or a change of position in the troops...
I was favoured to day with your Letter of the 26 Instant. It gave me extreme concern to hear of the complaint, which you transmitted. There is nothing I wish for more, than a happy understanding between the Inhabitants and every part of the Army—and this I have constantly endeavoured to promote. I have written to Major Strang & Mr Hyatt, inclosing a Letter to Major Lee with a copy of the...
In the close of my letter of the 5th Instant, I had the pleasure to acknowlege your favors of the 18th & 21st Ultimo. Besides the 80 battalions of Infantry, it is the intention of Congress to preserve as many of the 16 additional and other corps as can be kept up by means of incorporation, or continued in their present condition—considering at the same time such of the men composing these...
I am very sorry to find by the Report of the Baron Steuben there is no probability that we shall be put in possession of the Western Posts this fall—in consequence of this information and the late season of the year I have directed the Movement of the Troops to be stopped, & the preparations to be suspended until farther Orders. Major Giles (who is the bearer of this Letter) having occasion to...
[ Middlebrook, New Jersey, May 16, 1779. ] Refers to Clinton case of Thomas Done who had lost his sight in the service. Df , in writing of H, George Washington Papers, Library of Congress.
I have received your two favors of the 25th and 29th. I am obliged to your Excellency for the assurance of all the assistance in the power of this State in case of a co-operation with our allies—The degree of aid which will be necessary for this State cannot well be determined before hand—it will depend on the force of the Enemy and the state of our magazines at the moment. In the former we...
I have been honored with your Excellency’s favor of the 24th inclosing the Copy of a Letter From Col. Willet—From which I have learnt with great concern the repeated depredations that have been committed on your Western frontier, and should be extremely happy (were it in my power consistent with the general state of affairs) to afford a sufficient Detachment from this Army to cover the whole...
I yesterday evening received Your favor of the 13th and thank you for transmitting me a copy of Your Brother’s Letter. I am happy to find the Troops are in such health and Spirits. Major Gibbs inclosed you Yesterday the Charles Town papers of the 29th of May and 4th of June, which would shew Your Excellency all the operations in that quarter to those dates; and that matters are far short of...
I am extremely sorry that it is in my power to inform you, that a Captain Colson of the 5th Virginia Regiment a few days ago, violently wounded a Mr Vantassel of this State, of which he died in a little time after —The moment I was apprised of it, I directed a Letter to be written & sent to Genl Muhlenburg, to whose Brigade he belonged, to have him secured, in order that he might be delivered...