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Documents filtered by: Recipient="Clinton, George" AND Period="Revolutionary War"
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[ New York, August 3, 1783. Letter not found. ] “General Hamilton to Governor George Clinton,” Columbia University Libraries.
For some time past I have had a bill on France lying in Philadelphia the sale of which has been delayed on account of the excessive lowness of the exchange. I am told it has lately risen something, and I expect by Col Hay’s return to receive a sufficient sum to pay the value of the woman Mrs. H had of Mrs. Clinton. I hope the delay may be attended with no inconvenience to you. I wrote you some...
In my last letter to Your Excellency I took occasion to mention that it was of great importance to the state, at this time to have a representation here as points in which by its present situation it is particularly interested are dayly and will be dayly agitated. It is also of importance at this moment to the United States (not only from general considerations but) because we have a very thin...
In two or three letters, which I have had the honor of writing to Your Excellency lately, I mentioned the necessity of a representation of the state here and at the same time of my returning to my private occupations. I am obliged to inform Your Excellency that I cannot remain here above ten days longer. I have the honor to be Yr. Excellency’s Most Obed ser ALS , Blumhaven Library and Gallery,...
As the Legislature will shortly meet I take the liberty to mention to Your Excellency, that it appears to me of Great importance, they should take up the affair of Vermont on the idea of a compromise with Massachusetts and New Hampshire and propose to those States a meeting of Commissioners for that purpose. I have little hope that we shall ever be able to engage Congress to act with decision...
The bearer of this is an old woman and of course the most troublesome animal in the world. She wants to go into New York. It was in vain we told her no inhabitant could be permitted by us to go within the enemy’s lines without permission from the civil power. Old and decrepid as she is, she made the tour of the family and tried her blandishments upon each. I assured her Governor Clinton could...
I am honored with your excellency’s letter of the 29th. Decr. I have received an order from Col. Hay on Mr. Sands, which I have no doubt will shortly be paid. I have felt no inconvenience from not having the money sooner. Since my last to you, we have received no further accounts from Europe, so that we remain in the same uncertainty with respect to the negotiations for peace. Wether it will...
I did myself the honor of writing to you, immediately after my arrival at Head Quarters, in answer to two letters I found here, from you. There is a matter, which often obtrudes itself upon my mind, and which requires the attention of every person of sense and influence, among us. I mean a degeneracy of representation in the great council of America. It is a melancholy truth Sir, and the...
In a letter which I wrote lately to General Schuyler, I informed him of the import of the answer from Vermont, and what had been done with it in Congress. The Committee to whom it was referred have not yet reported; but I have little expectation of decision. Congress have been for some time employed on matters of the 1st. importance, devising a plan for carrying the 8th. Article of the...
The President of Congress will of course have transmitted to Your Excellency the plan lately adopted by Congress for funding the public debt. This plan was framed to accommodate it to the objections of some of the states; but this spirit of accomodation will only serve to render it less efficient, without making it more palatable. The opposition of the state of Rhode Island for instance is...