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[ Middlebrook, New Jersey ] May [ 22 ] 1779 . Introduces and recommends Major James Monroe. Df , in writing of H, George Washington Papers, Library of Congress. Cary was a large Virginia landowner and a leader in the Revolutionary movement in that state.
[On board the Ceres, off Scilly Isles, 24 July 1784 . Entry in SJL reads: “Ceres. off Scilly. A. Cary. Recommending St. Barbe. That [Alexander] Moore will get some hares, warren rabbits and partridges and deliver to St. Barbe who will deliver to him—to raise and turn out breeders—if he meets with N. Lewis and he will undertake to do the same at his own house, give him some.” Not found. St....
[ Paris, 7 Feb. 1786 . Entry in SJL under this date: “A Cary. Of introduction to Lyons. By Lyons.” Not found, but see TJ to John Adams, this date .]
I very sincerely lament that the situation of our service will not permit us to do justice to the merits of Major Monroe, who will deliver you this, by placing him in the army upon some satisfactory footing. But as he is on the point of leaving us and expresses an intention of going to the Southward where a new scene has opened, it is with pleasure I take occasion to express to you the high...
This will be delivered you by Mr. Paradise who married a daughter of the late Colo. Ludwell of Virginia and who now comes to that country to make preparations for establishing himself and family in it. As a stranger and man of character he would have all the benefits of your civilities and attentions; but as a man of letters, of the purest integrity, of perfect goodness, and republican...
I have been honored with your favor of the 25th Ulto Inclosing sundry resolutions of your Assembly respecting the insiduous Manoeuvres of the enemy, who, it is evident, cannot mean well, because they take indirect steps to obtain that, to which a plain road is opened; and every good Man is desirous of obtaining upon honourable terms. I thank you my good Sir for the resolves, wch you did me the...
It will be a misfortune to the few of my countrymen (and very very few they are indeed) who happen to be punctual. Of this I shall give you a proof by the present application, which I should not make to you if I did not know you to be superior to the torpidity of our climate. In my conversations with the Count de Buffon on the subjects of Natural history, I find him absolutely unacquainted...
As I mean to be a conscientious observer of the measures generally thought requisite for the preservation of our independent rights, so I think myself bound to account to my country for any act of mine which might wear an appearance of contravening them. I therefore take the liberty of stating to you the following matter that thro’ your friendly intervention it may be communicated to the...