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You moralize so prettily that if I were to judge from some parts of your letter of October 13 I should take you for an old Philosopher that had experienced the emptiness of Earthly Happiness. And I am very glad that you have so early seen through the romantic paintings with which the World is sometimes set off by the sprightly imaginations of the Ingenious. You have happily supplied by reading...
I received your Letter dated March the 1st. about a Week ago and It is not more to obey your demands, than to fulfill my own desires that I give you this early answer. I am glad you disclaim all punctiliousness in our correspondence. For my own part I confess I have not the face to perform ceremony in person and I equally detest it on paper though as Tully says It cannot blush. Friendship like...
I had the pleasure of Mr Wallace’s Company & your letter on Tuesday last. He left me to Day but not without requesting me to make mention of his kind remembrance of you when I should write to you. He professes a warm affection for you and you know the sincerity of his professions. I am much obliged to you for your information concerning my friends. I received a Line or two with yours from Mrss...
If I did not love you too well to scold at you I should begin this with upbraiding your long silence contrary to your express promise and my earnest Solicitations. The Bundle of Pamplets you sent by the Post has miscarried[.] I would not trouble you with sending them again but perhaps if you would enquire of the Post they might still be discovered. I expect this will be handed to you by Mr....
I received yours of the 12 August and give you this repeated Testimony of my punctuality. I got your letter to Mr Wallace at the same time much worn and abused. I have given it a new coat & shall forward it as soon as a safe Opportunity serves. Since you first hinted to me your suspence as to the settled business of your life, I have partook of your anxiety & [though it] has been often in my...
I have had the gratification of receiving both your letters, and the Pamphlets sent by Wilkinson. It is a reflection I am naturally led into whenever I write to you that I always have occasion to be returning my thanks for some kindness received without being able to retaliate. Gratitude is the only fund I can pay you out of which I am sensible your generosity accepts as sufficient: but at the...
Yours of the 25 of last month came into my hands a few days past. It gave singular pleasure not only because of the kindness expressed in it but because I had reason to apprehend the letter you recd. last from me had miscarried and I should fail in procuring the intelligence I wanted before the Trip I design in the Spring. I congratulate you on your heroic proceedings in Philada. with regard...
I have another favour to acknowledge in the receipt of your kind Letter of March the 4th. I did not intend to have written again to you before I obtained a nearer communication with you but you have too much interest in my inclinations ever to be denied a request. Mr. Brackenridge’s illness gives me great uneasiness: I think he would be a loss to America: His merit is rated so high by me that...
I am once more got into my native land and into the possession of my customary enjoyments Solitude and Contemplation, though I must confess not a little disturbed by the sound of War blood and plunder on the one Hand and the Threats of Slavery and Oppression on the Other. From the best accounts I can obtain from our Frontiers The Savages are determined in the extirpation of the Inhabitants,...
The receipt of your’s of the first inst. was peculiarly acceptable to me; the enjoyment of your Company at Philada. has so revived & increased my pristine Affection for you, that I found great pleasure in that token of you[r] Affectionate Kindness. And tho’ it is with the utmost chearfulness I emancipate you from the bondage of a punctual correspondence yet I find I cannot do without an...
The pamphlets & letters you sent me were safely delivered about ten days after the date of them. I esteem it a singular favor that you should be so thoughtfull of obliging me at a time when your attention must necessarally have been employed on many more important considerations. Your readiness also to serve me on any future occasion demands my acknowledgments. I have no acquaintance in...
Your very acceptable favours by Mr. Rutherford arrived safe but I perceived by the date, had a very tedious passage which perhaps may be attributed to the craziness of the Vessel in which you embarked them. I ought to mention in particular that I did not receive them till after I wrote my last as an apology for my not then acknowledging it I entirely acquiesce in your Opinion of our friend...
I intend to throw this in the way of Mr David Hoopes who I hear is setting out for Philada. As it is uncertain whether he may get it I shall only return a short answer to yours of Jany 4th. [Mr Dunlap’s mistake about price of his paper—the 2 Vol. of Papers too dear & vide lit.] We had a report here a few days [ago] that the New Yorkers had again given way & that the assembly had voted the...
This I expect will be delivered to you by the Revd. Mr Samuel Smith who will inform you of every thing respecting our affairs that I could let you know by Letter. I wrote to you very lately by Mr David Hoops in answer to yours contain[in]g a few lines from Mr Irvin. If it should fail of coming to you it will be proper I should know of it because I there mentioned what I desired as to Dunlap &...
I this day received your favor by Mr Hoopes but have not yet got the articles I find came along with it. Mr Hoopes lives at no very great distance so that I shall not be long without them. We have lately had a great alarm here about the Governor’s removing a large quantity of powder from our magazine and conveying it on board a ship of war: Not less [than] 600 men well armed and mounted...
ALS : Historical Society of Pennsylvania; draft: American Philosophical Society I have just now been urged to apply to you in behalf of a Stranger who is suppos’d to have spoken some disrespectful Words of you, and who is apprehensive of the Resentment of your Company, as he is told they are exceedingly exasperated against him. He declares that the Words ascrib’d to him, are much...
I received another acceptable pledge of your friendship two days ago in a letter dated June 2d. and, as usual, must begin this by discharging a debt of Gratitude to which the further accounts I have of your friendly services and intentions intitle you. I hope I have an inexhaustible fund of that however destitute I may be of other virtues. But I assure you I am often grieved at reflecting that...
I received your favor of the 10th. inst. and have since had a sight of the declaration and Address from the Congress. I must concur with you in every encomium that can be bestowed on them, particularly the last mentioned which for true Eloquence may vie with the most applauded Oration of Tully himself. These performances must be chiefly owing to a few illustrious writers of that body. Is it...
Ca. 21 May 1776 . In “A Memorandum Book,” Bradford noted on 28 May 1776: “This morning I recieved a Letter from Mr Maddison who is a member of the Virginia Convention, informing me of the declaration of Independency made by that body.” Since the resolution calling upon the delegates of Virginia in the Second Continental Congress to propose that “the United Colonies” be declared “free and...
I am constrained by the subscribers to your paper in this neighborhood to trouble you with information of the uncertainty with which they seem likely to come. The first mail came about ten days ago open and loose, and containing not more than one paper for any subscriber, and none for several. The papers which came were of three several dates. The last mail, which would have been the second,...
An Express being just setting off for Head Quarters, I cannot help imparting to you some very agreeable intelligence just recd. A Capt. of a Letter of Marke Vessel from thi[s] State, writes to the Govr. from Cheasepeak Bay that he left Martinique on the 23 Ult. that Letters had been recd. there from France as lat[e] as 1st. from sundry respectable Merchts. relating that the French Court had...
I had the pleasure of receiving yours of the 29th.[?] Ulto. by yesterday’s post, and agreeable to your request take this immediate opportunity of acknowledging it. The Inhabitants of this City roused by the extortions of the times and the example of your State are instituting regulations similar to those you mention. Whether they will have the necessary prudenc[e,] firmness & perseverence, or...
satisfaction, a visit from I must own as your not any beneficial affects fro[m] a satisfaction should be your health, than that the waters have been as I flatter myself they have for a confirmation of it to future season when it may be convenient for you to extend your ride as far as Orange; where I may generally be found in those months in which the Springs are most used. The abrupt arrival...
I have received the Proceedings of the Convention at Hartford, which you did me the honor to enclose. It is but just to acknowledge, that I was much pleased with the salutary measures recommended, and cannot but flatter myself, if carried into execution, they will be attended with very happy consequences. I have the honor to be With great regard Your Most obedt Servt DLC : Papers of George...
[ Philadelphia, March 5, 1794. On March 14, 1794, Bradford wrote to Hamilton : “I have the honor of acknowledging the receipt of your letters of the 5th instant.” Letters not found. ]
I had a personal interview with Mr. Fauchet yesterday; and endeavoured to satisfy him of the difficulty, and, as I conceived, the impracticability of advancing the million of Dollars, which he requested. He described his distress, produced by the various draughts of the French Consuls, with great force, and in strong colours; and begged, that he might be permitted to state it on paper. This of...
The Secretary of State has it in charge from the President of the United States, to request the attendance of the Secretary of the Treasury, the Secretary of War, and the Attorney General, at his Room on Monday next 11. o’Clock. The following, among other subjects, will be submitted. 1. Whether it be expedient to send, to England with the complaints of spoliation, some agent to manage them,...
The Secretary of State has the honor of inclosing for the consideration of the Secretaries of the Treasury and of War and the Attorney General of the United States, the papers in the case of the British Ship William, a prize to a French vessel of war. The Secretary of State is of opinion, that it is not proved, that she was taken within the protection of our Coasts, and therefore that she...
The President wishes your opinion, as to the step, proper to be taken, upon the inclosed address. To send to congress, what the President thinks unfit for himself, will be unkindly received; being uncivil in itself. To acknowledge the body, as such, is in every view inadmissible. So that the question seems to turn upon this; whether it be better to treat the paper with unqualiffied and silent...
[ Philadelphia, April 25, 1794. On May 1, 1794, Bradford wrote to Hamilton and referred to “your Letter of the 25th ultimo.” Letter not found. ]
The Secretary of State has the honor of informing the Secretaries of the Treasury and of war and the Attorney General, that subscriptions have been carried on in Boston and Norfolk, and the monies, arising therefrom have been tendered to the President for the relief of the Unhappy Citizens of the United States now in captivity in Algiers. Sometime ago the Citizens of Philadelphia were in...
The Secretary of State has the honor of informing the Secretary of the Treasury, the Secretary of War, and the Attorney General of the United States, that he has this day received a Convention bearing date the 27th. of March 1794 between Denmark and Sweden for the maintenance of the rights of neutral navigation. It is proper to notify the Gentlemen, that Mr. Jay is instructed, if he should...
The Secretary of State has the honor of informing the Secretaries of the Treasury and of war and the attorney general, that the President is desirous, that they would take into consideration the Resolutions lately passed by the Inhabitants of Kentucky, and the intelligence lately received from Mr. Seagrove relative to the affairs in Georgia. The President wishes to see the Gentlemen at his...
The Secretary of State has the honor of conveying to the Secretaries of the Treasury and of War, and the Attorney General the wish of the President, that instead of a meeting at his house at 12 oClock on Monday next the opinions upon the two points suggested in a note of this morning should be committed to writing, and sent to the President by that time. LC , RG 59, Domestic Letters of the...
Your letter by express duly came to hand. The separate power has I understand been dispatched. General Nevil suggests that if a disposition to comply should appear, the best proof of it would be a request from the parties to Mr. Johnson to resume the exercise of his Office with assurances of support from them. This idea is well worth your attention; though I do not expect you will approach...
The Secretary of State begs the favor of the opinion of the Secretaries of the Treasury and of War, and of the Attorney General upon the inclosed Letter of Mr. Hammond, of the 9th. ultimo. The point on which your advice will be particularly interesting is, whether the government of the United States is bound to urge the payment requested? LC , RG 59, Domestic Letters of the Department of...
[ Albany, April 10, 1795. On April 10, 1795, Hamilton wrote to Oliver Wolcott, Jr. : “I send a letter to The Attorney General which you will read seal & deliver.” Letter not found. ]
[ Albany, May 10, 1795. On May 21, 1795, Bradford wrote to Hamilton : “I thank you very sincerely for your letter of the 10th. inst.” Letter not found. ]
Yours of the 21st of May by going to Albany did not reach me till yesterday. The expectation of Mr. Adet properly varied the course of proceeding. I am glad the impression with you corresponded with mine. If Mr. Randolph shewed Fauchet any part of the instructions to Mr. Jay —I do not much regret that he manifests displeasure at the witholding of a part. When shall we cease to consider...
Hamilton, History John C. Hamilton, Life of Alexander Hamilton, a History of the Republic of the United States of America (Boston, 1879). , VI, 243. John Church Hamilton states that H wrote to members of George Washington’s cabinet on this date. No further evidence of this correspondence, however, has been found.
To be present at the meeting of Congress would have required me to set out on this day. But circumstances of necessity oblige me to ask of the Senate the indulgence of some time, probably of about a fortnight. Whether it be more or less I shall repair to my station the first moment it is possible for me to do so. A knolege that in the mean time it is so worthily filled, leaves me nothing to...