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Th: Jefferson salutes mr Bowdoin with great esteem & respect, and now incloses him copies of the letters he wrote him while in France according to the request in his favor of the 12th. inst. he would be happy to learn which of them did not get to mr Bowdoin’s hands, as he might perhaps still find out the conveyance through which it went. MeB .
I recieved the favor of your letter written soon after your arrival, a little before I left Washington & during a press of business preparatory to my departure on a short visit to this place. this has prevented my earlier congratulations to you, on your safe return to your own country. there, judging from my own experience, you will enjoy much more of the tranquil happiness of life, than is to...
Information has been received thro’ a channel justly claiming attention, that the people of West Florida meditate an effort to liberate themselves from the Spanish Government; and that with this view it is intended in case the pulse of this Government does not promise a taking them by the hand, to address themselves to the British Government. No doubt is entertained of the ease with which the...
Since the event which led to the late Proclamation of the President, inclosed in the letter to Genl. Armstrong and yourself, the British squadron in the waters of Virginia has conducted itself in the same insolent and hostile spirit. Merchant vessels arriving and departing, have been challenged, fired at, examined, and detained, within our jurisdiction; with as little scruple as if they were...
The enclosed copy of a Proclamation of the President will inform you of a late extraordinary hostility and insult committed by a British Ship of War on a frigate of the U. S. near the Capes of Virginia, and of the measure taken by the President in consequence of the outrage. The subsequent proceedings of the British Squadron in our waters have borne a like stamp of hostility; and altho’ it may...
I wrote you on the 10th. of July 06. but, supposing from your not acknoleging the reciept of the letter, that it had miscarried, I sent a duplicate with my subsequent one of Apr. 2. these having gone by the Wasp, you will doubtless have recieved them. since that yours of May 1. is come to hand. you will see, by the dispatches from the department of state, carried by the armed vessel the...
Your letter of Decr. 2d. came duly to hand. All of prior date, as appears by their successive references, were equally fortunate. The President has also received your two letters of Octr. 20 and Novr. 15. It is painful to find that the reserve and mistery which have so long enveloped our affairs with Spain, still embarrass the efforts to bring them to a proper state. The protracted delay is...
I wrote you on the 10th. of July last, but neither your letter of Oct. 20. nor that of Nov. 15. mentioning the reciept of it, I fear it has miscarried. I therefore now enclose a duplicate. as that was to go under cover of the Secretary of State’s dispatches by any vessel going from our distant ports, I retained the Polygraph therein mentioned for a safer conveyance. none such has occurred till...
The inclosed copy of a letter to Mr Ervine, accompanying a statement of the case of the Marquis de Casa Yrujo, with certain other documents, will give explanations very proper to be possessed by you. To these are added other printed papers, which bring down to this date, the information and proceedings which relate to the enterprize of Burr, and to such of his associates as have been arrested....
I enclose a Copy of the Act of Congress for suspending the prohibition to import certain British goods enacted during the last session. I have the honor to be, Sir, with great respect and consideration Your Most Obt. Servt. MBU .
I wrote you a long letter on the 10th. inst. since which your favor of May 20. has come to hand. by this I percieve, & with the deepest affliction, not only that a misunderstanding has taken place between yourself & Genl. Armstrong, but that it has occasioned a misconstruction of your powers likely to defeat the object of your mission, a mission on the result of which the eyes of all our...
I believe that when you left America the invention of the Polygraph had not yet reached Boston. it is for copying with one pen while you write with the other & without the least additional embarrasment or exertion to the writer. I think it the finest invention of the present age, and so much superior to the copying machine that the latter will never be continued a day by any one who tries the...
On the supposition that by the time this reaches you the negotiations prescribed in my letter of March 13 will have taken their final turn and that this may not be a favorable one it is thought proper by the president that in such a state of things you should endeavour to bring about an arrangement providing first that the status quo taking for the date the transfer of possession of Louisiana...
I have received successively your letters bearing date from the 18 of June to the 31st. of July. The circumstances both personal and public under which you proceeded from Spain to England, without repairing to Madrid, fully justified your conduct in the view of the President; and he has equally approved the Motives for making Paris the place of your waiting for his further instructions. These...
I have duly received from time to time your several letters bearing dates 3 July 10 & 15 Augt. 10 Sepr. 3 & 25 Octr & 26 Novr. Previous to the arrival of Mr Skipwith with your dispatches of Sept 10th our affairs with Spain had undergone the particular consideration of the President; with a reference as well to the change in the state of things in Europe, as to the approaching Session of...
Mr. James Barry, of this City, who has a Claim to a considerable Amount upon the Spanish Government for unfulfilled Contracts, has requested that it might be recommended to your patronage. He requests it, as having been depending for several years under the management of his Agent at Madrid, but without advancing to a prospect of adjustment, notwithstanding the clearness of his right, upon the...
Your favor of Mar. 25. has been duly recd. I regret that the state of your health renders a visit to this place unadvisable. Besides the gratification we should have felt from personal considerations the perusal of the correspondences, for some time back, with the governments of Europe most interesting to us, would have enabled you to act under all emergencies with that satisfaction to...
Having before received your Commission, you will herewith receive a letter of credence as Minister Plenipotentiary of the United States to His Catholic Majesty. In presenting the latter, the President authorizes and charges you to repeat the friendly assurances it contains, in terms best calculated to satisfy the Spanish Government of the disposition of the United States to maintain the...
On receiving your letter of Mar. 26 I thought proper to forward it to the President at his Seat in Virginia, whence it did not return till last evening. The President himself will be here about wednesday or thursday next. No time will be lost in drawing his attention to the measures preparatory to your departure for Madrid, which may however be deemed the more or less urgent according to the...
Your letter of the 28th. of Feby. has been duly received. The continuance of your infirm health is sincerely regretted on personal as well as on public considerations; the latter of which give some importance to a visit from you here previous to your departure for Spain. The President nevertheless readily acquiesces in dispensing with such a visit in case the obstacles to it should not be...
I have recd. & laid before the President your letter of the 4th. inst. He acquiesces in the postponement of your departure for Madrid, in preference to the loss of your services by a resignation, and thinks the advantage that will result from a previous visit to this place, will overbalance the delay which it will add to the time at which you might otherwise be able to embark. As you suppose...
Your favor of the 19th. inst: has been duly recd. It gives me pleasure to find that you have reconciled yourself to the Mission to which you have been called, & to a visit to this place before you undertake it. I regret only the indisposition which confines you for the present; but which I hope may soon yield to the means used for reestablishing your health. The precise objects within your...
The President of the United States being desirous of availing the public of your services as Minister Plenipotentiary to His Catholic Majesty, I have the honor to enclose your commission . As in many respects it would be desireable, that we should have the pleasure of your presence at the seat of government, before your departure for Spain, if it can be reconciled with your private...
I recollect with great satisfaction the acquaintance I had the honour of having with your most respectable father, and have seen with great pleasure the line of conduct you have yourself pursued, so worthy of him. the wonderful combinations of events, with the uses made of them, has been such as might lead even the best men from the true principles of free government. that you have not yielded...
Since my arrival in this place I have been honored with your letters of the 18th of Feby and 24th of April. To meet the congratulations and assurances of support from those Characters whose opinions I revere, will be of no small service in enabling me to overcome the diffidence which I have in my own abilities, to execute properly the important and untried task which my Country has assigned...
I do myself the Honour to inclose to your Excellency as President of the Accademy of Arts and Sciences a Letter and a Sketch from our ingenious Countryman Mr Copley. The Artists who engraved the Plates for the Accademy, he thinks have failed in Perspective a fault that I suppose is easily corrected. With great Respect I have the Honour / to be, your Excellencys most / obedient & humble servant
I have at present only time to inform your Excellency that I have communicated to my Lord Carmarthen as private Information all that I have received from your Excellency. not having received orders from Congress concerning the whole of it, I could not make official use of it. His Lordship said that he was sorry to see there was such a Complaint: and that Lord Dorchester had Authority to settle...
The inclosed Letter of Sept. 9. from D r. Jon. Dryander to me, accompanied the Packet which I have addressed to your Excellency, for the Use of the Accademy of Arts and Sciences, for whose Service I shall always esteem it, an honour and a Pleasure to do any Thing in my Power. With my best Respects to your / Excellency and the Accademy, I have the / honour to be, Sir your most obedient / and...
I have lately written to Congress, An Account of the Sentiments and Conduct of the Lords of the Admiralty, upon Captain Stanhopes Letters, which will no doubt be transmitted to you from N. York. It consists in Substance in the Signification to Capt. Stanhope of the “Sensible Displeasure” of their Lordships, and in his Recall from the American Station. In a late Visit to the Hide a Country Seat...
I have lately written to Congress, An Account of the Sentiments and Conduct of the Lords of the Admiralty, upon Captain Stanhopes Letters, which will no doubt be transmitted to you from N. York. It consists in Substance in the Signification to Capt. Stanhope of the “Sensible Displeasure” of their Lordships, and in his Recall from the American Station. In a late Visit to the Hide a Country Seat...
D r. Gordon, Yesterday called upon me, with the Letter which your Excellency did me, the Honour to write me, on the 10 th. of April— I have long since transmitted to Congress, the Answer of the Board of Admiralty to the Representations relative to the Conduct of Cap t. Stanhope, in which the Letters of that officers are disapproved, The Representations of the Encroachments on the territory of...
D r. Gordon, Yesterday called upon me, with the Letter which your Excellency did me, the Honour to write me, on the 10 th. of April I have long since transmitted to Congress, the Answer of the Board of Admiralty to the Representations relative to the Conduct of Cap t. Stanhope, in which the Letters of that officers are disapproved, The Representations of the Encroachments on the territory of...
Your Excellencies Letter of the 12. of January I have had the Honour to receive, and am much obliged to you for the Information in it Your Opinion of the Policy of this Country, will be found in the Result of Things to be just, and your Reasoning in Support of it is so conclusive and at the Sametime, so obvious, that it is astonishing it has not its Effect upon the Cabinet. Every Consideration...
Your Excellencies Letter of the 12. of January I have had the Honour to receive, and am much obliged to you for the Information in it. Your Opinion of the Policy of this Country, will be found in the Result of Things to be just, and your Reasoning in Support of it is so conclusive and at the same time, so obvious, that it is astonishing it has not its Effect upon the Cabinet. Every...
I do myself the honour of inclosing a few Extracts of Letters written in 1783 to M r Livingstone, which it is to be presumed were laid before Congress: but I have not heard that the Plan Suggested in them of purchasing raw Sugars in France, Spain and Portugal, to be refined in Boston, New York and Philadelphia for Exportation to Russia, Germany & Italy, has been ever attempted, untill this...
I do myself the honour of inclosing a few Extracts of Letters written in 1783 to M r Livingstone, which it is to be presumed were laid before Congress: but I have not heard that the Plan Suggested in them of purchasing raw Sugars in France, Spain and Portugal, to be refined in Boston, New York and Philadelphia for Exportation to Russia, Germany & Italy, has been ever attempted, untill this...
I was honoured with your Excellency’s letters of Octob. 10. and 23. by Mr. Barrett. Before his arrival a Mr. Boylston had come here with a cargo of whale oil, and had wished of the Marquis de la Fayette and myself to procure for him the same exemptions from duty as had been obtained the year before for a company. I was of opinion it would be better at once to obtain an abatement for all our...
Facsimile: Reproduced in Charles Hamilton Auction No. 57 (New York; April 20, 1972), p. 28; copy: Massachusetts Historical Society I take the Liberty of introducing to your Acquaintance, two of my particular Friends, members of the Royal Society of London, Mr. Jones & Mr. Paradise. You will find them men of Learning & Ingenuity, and have great Pleasure in conversing with them. I recomend them...
[ Teaneck, New Jersey ] August 28, 1780 . Believes an operation against New York no longer possible. Regrets that at present the Army cannot repay its loan of arms. Approves of resolutions of the convention of the four eastern states. Reviews European situation. Df , in writing of H, George Washington Papers, Library of Congress.
Liberty Pole [ New Jersey ] August 28, 1780 . Thanks Bowdoin for loan of arms. Reports that Rhode Island Militia except for those at West Point have been dismissed. Mentions need for supplies. Urges completion of Continental battalions. Df , in writing of H, George Washington Papers, Library of Congress.
I have been duly honored with your letter of the 16th. I am much obliged to the Council for the loan of the arms and am persuaded they have spared all that were in their power. I believe they have been misinformed about the number of arms at Springfield—By the last return there were two thousand muskets capable of repair, and about sixteen thousand Gun barrels, which being mounted would be fit...
I am much obliged to you my dear Sir for your letter of the 17th and for the interesting intelligence you do me the favor to communicate. The Blockade of the Port of Brest by delaying the Sailing of the second division makes a material change in our prospects. I fear it will put it out of our power to operate against New York, but if we are not unfortunate in Europe and if vigorous measures...
I am honored with yours of the 31st Ulto. The measure of ordering the three months Militia to repair to Rhode Island upon the expectation of the British Army was certainly right, but as the force which was embarked on the Sound has returned again to New York— I imagine the Count De Rochambeau will not think them longer necessary and that they will be ordered to proceed to the North River. The...
I had not the honor of receiving your favr of the 12th ulto untill the 28th upon my march from Jersey to this place, at which I am collecting our force to move down towards New York in hopes of taking advantage of the absence of Sir Henry Clinton with the greater part his force. I am much obliged by the information you give me of the quantity of Powder which may be obtained in the State of...
I am commanded by His Excellency General Washington to write to your honorable board, to request the loan of some heavy cannon and shot, howitzers and shells, for the intended operation of the present campaign. There is the most pressing demand for the number and sizes specified in the enclosed paper. But if the total cannot be had, the number to be lent to be regulated by the quantity of shot...
I have received your Two favors of the 29th & 31st of last month, with the plan referred to, and have to return you my warmest thanks for the same & for your very kind & polite attention to my request. The plan & table of reference are very intelligible and satisfactory—and convey a clear idea of many points, about which I was uninformed before. These may be of great use—and from the manner...
I take the liberty to transmit to your care a Letter for Major General Heath under a flying Seal. From an apprehension that he might have left Boston before it arrived and the importance of the objects to which it extends I am induced to use this freedom. If the General has not returned to the Army, I would request the favor of you to have the Letter sealed after perusing it, and delivered to...
Morristown [ New Jersey, April 26 ] 1780 . Thanks Bowdoin for a copy of “the plan proposed for the constitution of [his] state.” Df , in writing of H, George Washington Papers, Library of Congress.
I am much obliged to you for your favour of the 6th instant transmitting me a copy of the plan proposed for the constitution of your state. I have not yet had leisure to give it an attentive consideration, but from a cursory view it appears to me to be a very judicious one. and to possess all the requisites towards securing the liberty and happiness of individuals, and at the same time giving...
The evil which I apprehended from the enlistm⟨ent⟩ of Deserters, as pointed out in my letter of the 17th instant, has already made its appearance. One of the Colonels informs me that every British Deserter sent to his Regt, except one, has already gone off. One of these people, a few Nights ago, took off a light Horse with his accoutrements from an advanced picket. I hope upon this proof of...