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To the Ministers Plenipotentiary of the United States of America, at the Court of Versailles empowered to negociate a Peace, or to any one or more of them. First. You are instructed and authorised to announce to his Imperial Majesty the Emperor of Germany or to his Ministers the high Sense which the United States in Congress assembled entertain of his exalted Character and eminent virtues, and...
I came here a few days ago to deliver a Letter from the Emperor of Moracco to the King which I put into the Hands of the Count de Florida Blanca, acknowledging the Sense I had of his Attention & thanking him with great sincerity on the Part he had taken in our business at Moracco, He seemed very much pleased with our Success, and smiling replyed “Now that we have happily finished this Treaty...
I arrived here after an agreeable Passage of Five days and was very well received by the Governor & by the People who seem pleased to see Persons from a Country at so great a distance come to compliment their Sovereign; As the Governor had no orders concerning our going forward, I was obliged to send a Courier to Morocco to demand that Permission, and at the same time wrote to M r. Chiappi of...
By the bearer Colonel Franks I do myself the honor to send you in a small Box the following articles. 1 st. A Book containing the original Treaty in Arabic between the Emperor of Morocco and the United States. 2. Three translations of the Treaty in English, to each of which is added a translation of a Declaration made by Tahar Fennish by order of His Majesty in addition & explanation of the 10...
I hope to have the Pleasure of soon hearing from you, and of being informed whether you have a my Commands for me farther than Morocco. I have long been anxious to see the Trade of our Country to these Parts, put on a safe and respectable footing, as I am well acquainted with the Importance of the Object, and if I can, while I am in the Neighbourhood of Africa, in the smallest Degree...
I am at present waiting for a fair wind to embark for Ceuta to avoid the Quaranteen in Spain, and I embrace the Delay occasion’d by the Strong Easterly Winds that have prevail’d for Sometime, to reply to the Queries with which you honour’d me at parting.—You put them respecting the Barbary States generally but as my business has been with the Emperor of Morocco only, I shall confine myself to...
I wrote you the 26 th. of last Month and expected to have followed my Letter in a week, but several unforeseen Matters have hitherto detained us; however I expect we shall set out tomorrow or the day following. The 13 th. Instant the Treaty was sent to me by the Effindi since which some important alterations have been made which the Villainy & carelessness of the Talbe Houdrani (to whom the...
The Day before yesterday Mr Carmichael received Letters from Algiers from M r Lamb, dated the 29 th. of last Month, and from M r Randal the 26 th. (which I think a wrong Date) with a Postscript from onboard a Vessel in the Bay of Alicant of the 1 st. Inst. after a Passage of 26. [. . .]. He cannot come on shore without a Permission from Court to shorten his Quarantine, which Mr Carmichael has...
As you will probably wish to know the particulars of the Negotiations of the Treaty with the Emperor, and as the perusal will not take up a great deal of time, I shall lay them before you— After the first Audience was over M r. Taher Fennish, in whose Hands the Negotiation was placed, came from the Emperor and informed me that His Majesty had read the Translation of the Letters–That he had...
I wrote to you from Cadiz the 2 nd. of last month, a Copy of which goes under the cover of this and the original, with the papers mentioned therein, will I hope be very soon deliver’d to you by Colonel Franks.—On my arrival here I had the pleasure of receiving M r. Jefferson’s letter of the 26 Sep r informing me that for the present any farther attempts to arrange matters with the Barbary...
Though in a letter written at this place–dated the 10 th. instant, I gave you a long answer to the questions with which you charged me, I will now add some farther particulars on the Subject of this Country, which you will possibly be inclined to know.— The Emperor is on the most cordial and friendly footing with Spain, the presents, made him from that Court, have been uncommonly great; and...
Since my arrival here, the Ninth, nothing has occurr’d worth your Attention; I am waiting for a Vessel that is Bound to Magadore and expect to Sail in a few Days. You have probably as late Accounts from M r. Lamb as I Can give you, yet it may not be Improper to Inform you of his Arrival at Alicant the 24 th. of last Month, where doubtless his Quaranteen has delay’d his proceeding to...
I arrived here to Day and shall Continue My Journey to Tangiers Early in the Morning,—The Plague being at Constantina occasions a Rigorous Quaranteen of 40 Days (from Barbary) in Spain—I shall therefore Endeavor to get into Ceuta, which being in the hands of the Spaniards is an Exception to the above remark, and I think the Quaranteen from thence is only twelve [...] Days— The Treaty shall be...
This day week we arrived here, since which I have had two audiences from His Majesty, the first a public one & the second a private one of yesterday. It is but a few minutes since I heard that a Courrier will depart this Evening for Daralbeyda, & I have not time to enter into particulars. It will be agreable however for you to know, that the last draught of the Treaty is made, & will probably...
Copy: National Archives I am honored by the commands of Congress to transmit you a set of instructions in consequence of your joint and seperate letters of the months of June and July last, by Captain Barney, which I do myself the honor to enclose. These were not finished till the 29th. ult. after having undergone the most mature deliberation and fullest discussion in Congress. Yesterday we...
I am sorry to inform you, that by the Resignation of M r. Livingston, as minister for foreign affairs, it has become necessary, that you should receive the Resolutions of Congress relative to your Mission, through my Hands. The Disadvantage arising from this Necessity, untill a Successor to that worthy Gentleman is appointed, will be yours, as it is impossible for me to do more than barely to...
As Congress have not yet elected any Minister for Foreign Affairs, and knowing the importance of your Being fully informed of every public transaction relative to these States, I have concluded that you would not think it amiss to hear from me on the subject of the removal of Congress to this place, tho’ I cannot consider this communication as official but merely for your information in my...
Reprinted from J. J. Boudinot, ed., The Life, Public Services, Addresses and Letters of Elias Boudinot … (2 vols., Boston, 1896), I , 410–13. Previous to my leaving the Chair of Congress, I take the liberty again to address you, merely as an individual that you may not be left totally without Information until the Choice of a Minister for foreign Affairs shall take place. I have pressed...
Copies: Library of Congress (two), Massachusetts Historical Society, National Archives This letter from Elias Boudinot, president of Congress, not only announces the resignation of Minister for Foreign Affairs Robert R. Livingston, it also encloses a resolution of great importance to the peace commissioners. On February 5 John Adams had written to Congress that there no longer was a reason to...
Copy: National Archives As Congress have not yet elected any Minister for Foreign Affairs, and knowing the importance of your Being fully informed of every public transaction relative to these States, I have concluded that you would not think it amiss to hear from me on the subject of the removal of Congress to this place, tho’ I cannot consider this communication as official but merely for...
I this day rec d. from the Secretary of States Department a letter from the Count D Expilly inclosing one from M r Lamb, copies of which I have the honor to transmit for Your Excellencies Information. Mess rs. Lamb and Randall left Barcelona the 11 th. Ult o. After their Departure I procured a letter in their favor from his Exc y. the C t. de Florida Blanca to the C t. D Expilly which I...
I forward the inclosed Letter from M r. Lamb for your Excellencies Information: That Gentleman has also written to me, But as I suppose he has given M r. Jefferson a more ample & satisfactory Detail of the State of his Negotiation than I can comprehend from his Letter to me, I do not think it necessary to forward a Copy of it. M r. Barclay to whom I have communicated all the Intelligence I...
(I) DS : American Philosophical Society (three); D (draft): National Archives; (II) copies: American Philosophical Society, Library of Congress, Massachusetts Historical Society (three), William L. Clements Library; D (draft): National Archives In late May, 1781, the Austrian and Russian courts, invited by Britain to mediate its war with France and Spain, proposed terms to serve as a basis of...
DS : Library of Congress; draft, two copies, and incomplete copy: National Archives; copy: Massachusetts Historical Society By The United States in Congress Assembled To the Ministers Plenipotentiary of the United States of America at the Court of Versailles empowered to negociate a Peace or to any one or more of them. First. You are instructed and authorised to announce to his Imperial...
Copies: Archives du Ministère des affaires étrangères, Library of Congress (two), National Archives (two), Massachusetts Historical Society, Charles E. Feinberg, Detroit (1957); L (draft): National Archives; LS : Philip D. Sang, River Forest, Illinois (1959), Massachusetts Historical Society You are hereby authorised and instructed to concur in behalf of these United States with his most...
Copy: Massachusetts Historical Society I was honoured with your favour of the 12th. of Decr: by the last post, enclosing a Copy of the preliminary Treaty of Peace between his Britannic Majesty and the United-States. I most heartily congratulate with you upon this great event, in which you have had the honour of so distinguished a part. I think that we ought to be, and shall be satisfied with...
ALS and two copies: Massachusetts Historical Society; copy: Library of Congress I have the honour to transmit to you herewith a packet containing one hundred passports for American Vessels which I have this moment received by a Courier from England. I take this opportunity of acquainting you that a proclamation was issued out in the King’s Name on the 14th Instant, making known the cessation...
Quoique la lettre que vous m’aues fait l’honneur de m’écrire le 22 e du mois passé, ne me flattat pas de recevoir les Secours dont les Finances du Congrès avoient besoin; Néantmoins, l’Espérance du Succès des Soins que j’étois bien assuré que vous donneriés, Messieurs, à un objet aussi intéressant, m’a fait parvenir à Satisfaire à tous les payemens qui Se Sont présentés, jusqu’à ce moment; qui...
Copies: Massachusetts Historical Society, Library of Congress; partial copy: Library of Congress It is some Months ago since I had the honor to write you, & am well persuaded, altho I received no Answer thereto, that it will have engaged your attention. I earnestly wish it may have been productive of an Improvement to the Finances of Congress which I then foresaw would be short of our Wants &...
LS : Historical Society of Pennsylvania Quoique la lettre que vous m’aves fait l’honneur de m’écrire le 22e du mois passé, ne me flattat pas de recevoir les Secours dont les Finances du Congrès avoient besoin; Néantmoins, l’Espérance du Succès des Soins que j’étois bien assuré que vous donneriès, Messieurs, à un objet aussi intéressant, m’a fait parvenir à Satisfaire à tous les payemens qui se...
Copies: Public Record Office, Library of Congress, Massachusetts Historical Society August 12 and 13 were of far greater diplomatic consequence than this exchange of formal letters about the birth of an English princess (the present letter and the commissioners’ answer of the following day) would suggest. On Tuesday, August 12, at the weekly meeting of ministers at Versailles, Franklin and...
Copies: Massachusetts Historical Society (two), William L. Clements Library, Library of Congress, National Archives (two); transcript: National Archives When the American peace commissioners saw David Hartley at Versailles on Tuesday, June 17, they told him that Congress had issued an order on April 24 opening American ports to British vessels—or so they understood from credible private...
(I) Copies: Massachusetts Historical Society (four), William L. Clements Library, Library of Congress, National Archives (four); press copy of copy: National Archives; (II) Copies: Massachusetts Historical Society (four), Archives du Ministère des affaires étrangères, William L. Clements Library, Library of Congress, National Archives (four); press copy of copy: National Archives Formal...
Two copies: National Archives; ALS (draft): Williams L. Clements Library I have received the honour of your Letter dated March 31. 1784 with the enclosures, wch. I have communicated to his Majesty’s Ministers. I have the Pleasure to inform you that the Ratification on our Part, is now making out, and that I have received orders to prepare for the Exchange at Paris with all convenient Speed....
ALS : William L. Clements Library; copies: Library of Congress, Massachusetts Historical Society, National Archives; press copy of copy: National Archives As the day is now fixed for the signatures of the Definitive treaties between Great Britain France and Spain I beg leave to inform you that I am ready to sign the Definitive treaty between Great Britain and the united States of America...
As the Day is now fixed for the signatures of the Definitive Treaties between Great Britain, France & Spain, I beg leave to inform your Excellencies that I am ready to sign the Definitive Treaty between Great Britain & the United States of America, whenever it shall be convenient to you. I beg the Favour therefore of you to fix the Day. My Instructions confine me to Paris as the Place...
Copies: Library of Congress (two), William L. Clements Library, Massachusetts Historical Society, National Archives; press copy of copy: National Archives It is agreed, that the Citizens of the United States of America shall be permitted to import into and to export from any Port or Place of the Territories belonging to the Crown of Great Britain in American Ships, any Goods, Wares &...
Copies: Library of Congress, William L. Clements Library, Massachusetts Historical Society; two incomplete copies and incomplete transcript: National Archives The American peace commissioners grew increasingly suspicious as they waited for Fox to respond to the article that Hartley had presented to them without prior approval on May 21. Hartley drafted another memorial for them on June 1, but...
It is with the sincerest Pleasure that I congratulate you on the happy Event which took Place Yesterday, viz, the Signature of the Definitive Treaty between our two Countries. I consider it as the auspicious Presage of returning Confidence and of the future Intercourse of all good offices between us; I doubt not that our two Countries will entertain the same Sentiments, and that they will...
Permit me to address the enclosed Memorial to your Excellencies, and to explain to you my Reasons for So doing. It is because many Consequences now at a great Distance, and unforeseen by Us may arise between our two Countries, perhaps from very minute and incidental Transactions, which in their beginnings may be impercepteble and unsuspected as to their future Effects. Our respective...
Copy and press copy of copy: National Archives; copies: William L. Clements Library, Library of Congress, Massachusetts Historical Society, Public Record Office It is with the sincerest Pleasure that I congratulate you on the happy Event which took Place Yesterday, viz., the Signature of the Definitive Treaty between our two Countries. I consider it as the auspicious Presage of returning...
1. That Lands belonging to Persons of any description which have not actually been sold shall be restored to the old Possessors without Price. 2. That an equal and free Participation of the different carrying Places, and the Navigation of all the Lakes and Rivers of that Country thro’ which the Water Line of Division passes between Canada and the United States shall be enjoyed fully and...
D : Massachusetts Historical Society; copy: Public Record Office David Hartley arrived in Paris on April 24. The following day he called on the individual American peace commissioners and found them eager to arrange for the opening of British and American ports to each other’s trade and to conclude as quickly as possible a definitive treaty of peace. On April 26 he went to Versailles,...
Copies: National Archives (two), Library of Congress, Massachusetts Historical Society, Public Record Office; transcript: National Archives The proposition which has been made for an universal & unlimited reciprocity of Intercourse & Commerce, between Great-Britain and the American United-States, requires a very serious Consideration on the part of Great-Britain, for the reasons already stated...
LS : National Archives Respected Friends John Adams, Benjamin Franklin John Jay & Henry Laurens, Esquires. Although my Name may be unknown to you, it is not so to many of your Countrymen whom the chance of War threw into Captivity at Kinsale & here during the late War, so unnaturally waged, & persisted in by a weak, wicked Ministry— In the early part of it some few warm Friends to America...
ALS : Newberry Library; transcript: New York Public Library Since the Early Period When I Had the Happiness to Be Adopted Among the sons of America, I Ever Made it My Point to do that Which I thought Would prove Useful to Her Cause or Agreable to Her Citizens. After We Had Long Stood By ourselves, France did join in our Quarrell, and So Soon as Count d’Estaing’s departure Made My Presence...
ALS : Massachusetts Historical Society Having Been Honoured With letters from Congress, it Becomes my duty to Consult You Upon a point Which they Have particularly Recommended— In the late preliminaries no time is Mentionned for the American Merchants paying their English debts— A Matter of Great Moment to our Merchants who Require at least three or four Years to Accomplish the Business— Upon...
Copies: Massachusetts Historical Society, Library of Congress Having Yesterday conferred with Count de Vergennes upon some Public Concerns, He requested I would tell you what, instead of troubling you with the Demand of a meeting, I think better to mention in this Note. The several Powers said he, are going to make up their Treaties, and when ready to sign, they will of Course meet to do it...
LS and copy: Massachusetts Historical Society; copy and incomplete copy: Library of Congress We observe by the favour of your Excellencies most honour’d letter of 22 Inst. that Mr. Grand has laid before your Excs. a state of the Affairs of the United States under his Care; and that the Dispositions made upon him are Such, that therefore your Excs. advise us to remit to Mr. Grand on account of...
I Rec d. Your Excellencys letters of the 20 th ult. I finde by them that M r. Randall had not Come to Paris when they were wrote, by M r. Randall I Stated the Exact Situation of our affaires in Algiers. and sent forw d. a Duplicate to Congress. the Demands at Algiers no Doubt will be greate. my health will by no means admitt of my undertakeing the Journey your Excellency Points out. I Dare say...